New answers tagged

1

It looks like the screw was installed too deep and ripped through the paper and thus has no support. Add a screw flush with the paper 1" away into the joist. Then patch with setting compound and paper tape, finish as usual


0

Use a flat head screwdriver; that will probably work. If you can't get any leverage, use pliers to get more leverage on the screwdriver. Good luck!


0

The tool designed for the job is a screw extractor You can get these from most hardware outlets. They're handy to have in your toolkit. Here's a detailed explanation: https://www.wikihow.com/Use-a-Screw-Extractor There are plenty of videos online, just search your favourite video site for screw extractor


1

Since it is a plastic box I would grab the screw head with locking pliers ("vice grips") literally as tight as possible, and try to turn it out. This should be able to force the screw to turn in the plastic, despite the rust. I would recommend not removing the box until you've exhausted other possibilities. The cost of the new box is not the issue,...


0

I had good luck with Rustoleum rust dissolver (gel).


1

I once removed a really badly rusted screw with a pair of locking pliers (AKA mole wrench, vice grip). I'd tried penetrating oil, big screwdrivers including an offset screwdriver, and (if I recall) using some impact, all to no avail, and I didn't hold out much hope — but the mole wrench got it turning fairly easily. So if you have one of those, it's well ...


5

Cut strip in middle. Bend each part and use as a "spanner" to friction turn the screws while also applying torque to the screws. Having three arms or a helper makes this easier. Once you have even slight screw movement a vice-grip can grip the heads. Filing flats on opposite sides of a screw head make it much easier to grip them with a vice-grip, ...


4

The box looks like it is plastic, so if you can get a good grip on the screws, they should be able to be forcibly removed. You could start with the impact driver, then the ole Dremel a deep slot in the top, and if that fails, I like Willk's suggestion of hacking (or cutting) out the crossbar to get more access to the screw head. A vice grips should work ...


5

Try using an impact driver , the other rusted screw may shear off though , judging by its condition. I'd opt replacing the box , as its too much headache to fix. If you do get it out, try adding antiseize next time to the screws or getting a box that has a better design regarding screw placement and water entry (ip rated waterproof/outdoor gpo?) or even ...


13

Hacksaw? If you saw thru the rusty plate (twice, one for left slot and one for right) and remove it by pulling it out from under the screw, the remaining screw will be sticking up enough for you to get hold of the whole head with a pliers and unscrew it. It is hard to argue w Alaska Man (or you) re merits of replacing the whole box. But it seems like you ...


8

WD-40 is NOT a good penetrating oil. Liquid Wrench is better, but still not that great. The best kinds are called Kroil or PB Blaster, you can find them in auto parts stores. But if you don't have an auto parts store nearby, wintergreen oil can be bought at many drug stores and is much much better than WD-40 or Liquid Wrench. With a good penetrating oil you ...


0

Yes, you can patch right over that. Obviously the screw is well anchored and should not result in a drywall pop later. Stainless doesn't grab drywall mud as well as black oxide screws, but since it's recessed into the wall a bit you can skim right over it. Do your best to fill under the screw head before you finish. Before you begin I'd take a sharp utility ...


4

Turn the adjusting knob on the locking pliers so that it takes both hands to clamp them shut on the screw head and squashes some small flats into the screw head when shut. Hold your locking pliers flat against the wall Clamp them shut Unscrew You want the pliers so tight that you can barely get them clamped. That will get you the maximum grip on the screw ...


2

You could try a manual impact driver with the apropriate size of pozidriv (not philips) bit. (looks like PZ2) Or bend it over with a nail punch and then tap it round in a circle to losen it or bend it back the other way to snap it off, or do the same thing using the locking pliers That will leave you with the hole, drywall repair is failry easy, trim off ...


0

Deck screws are unsuitable for that use. They are light in gauge and usually have a bugle style head. You spaced them very close together so you are 'getting away with it' for now. Most installations don't have a lot of direct pull out pressure, it's often mostly a shear load. Your installation is almost wholly in the pull out category. In this situation I'd ...


1

If your located in the States or Canada most light fixture screws will be SAE or imperial measurements. The most common screw size used for fixtures will be a 8/32. The next sizes closest to this are the smaller 6/32 and the larger 10/24. Why not shorten the original screw? Thread the nut down the screw to below the length yyou want it to be. Cut the shaft ...


1

The corners are almost never exactly 90 degrees - welcome to real houses, as opposed to fictional constructs. Fastening to the walls has been hashed over rather well. It's not the difficult part of this job - for brick walls, I'd probably use lead anchors in 10-12 mm holes 35-60mm deep. Structurally, a "taller or deeper" baton (batten) on the right ...


3

Given the lengthwise span and the truncated support at the right end, I'd use cleats on the ends and two brackets across the back. 25mm MDF won't handle that load without a lot of bounce and some chance of collapse. On the left, I'd use four 3/16" x 2-3/4" concrete screws with hex heads. Phillips heads are fine also, but they're difficult to keep ...


1

I think you should be fine with a couple of tapcon screws. How much weight you put on it will determine whether it collapses or not. Not because the tapcons will fail but because I wouldn't trust a lot of weight on a 4' MDF board without center support. Tapcon = concrete screws. I'd say at least a 60mm length and 6 or 7mm diameter should work. Yes tapcon is ...


0

Consider tapping to M7 if M8 is actually too big. If you're in the US you can get M7x1 20mm socket-head cap screws or hex-head screws, as well as a tap, from McMaster. If you're in a metric country, it will probably be as available and cheaper. The size of a stripped-out M6 hole (~6mm) is about right for an M7 tap (6.1mm)


2

can I use the normal (right-handed) drill bits, and the Reverse function of the power drill to undo a screw with stripped head? NO it will not grab onto the head. The reason the reverse bit may work is because the cutting part of the bit is designed to cut into the surface, when it starts to cut or grab it then turns the screw counter clockwise. A normal ...


1

Depending on the construction of your jointer, a potential fix is to adhere a small plate to the table on one side of the stripped out hole, and drill and tap into that plate.


10

Tap size chart and Drill Size Chart are the useful search terms. Most any useful tap size chart will have the drill size listed. A drill size chart will help you sort out the relative sizes of drills in fractional inch, number, letter, and metric sizes. Taps you can get at the hardware store may simplify the process by being packaged with the correct tap ...


0

Will it fit? almost certainly. Is it a good idea? probably not. Most modern regular drills* have a 3 jaw chuck which will grip round or hexagonal objects in a wide variety of sizes. While I can't see the jaws of the chuck in your photo I would be extremely surprised if it was not such a chuck. The problem with using a corded drill as a screwdriver is that ...


3

You absolutely can. In the professional world that's the standard, in fact. Your drill can accept any round or hexagonal bit or driver up to 10mm in diameter. It's not fussy. Chucks don't vary between corded and cordless tools, generally speaking.


3

Metric screw diameters are always below nominal. The nominal size is as if the thread came to a sharp point, and it doesn't. For the exact amount see Wikipedia, from where I lifted this drawing (thanks to user Inductiveload). Note the P/8 (i.e pitch/8) flat on the outside (top) of the external thread. This means the outside diameter (roughly doing the ...


0

Quite frankly, you need a thread gauge: https://www.amazon.com/ChgImposs-Imperial-Whitworth-Industrial-Measurement/dp/B07J9V9JTK/


0

For machine screws: You can either purchase a screw identifying plate (with labeled threaded and sometimes clearance holes), or you can purchase known nuts that you keep track of and thread "suspect" screws into them. There are also dedicated thread pitch gauges which are far more accurate than trying to "eyeball count" threads against a ...


2

It stands to reason that most threads will measure slightly below nominal. That's much less of a compatibility problem than if they're too large. It's probably due to threads being cut or cast using tooling for the actual shank diameter, where slightly too much material is removed either intentionally or due to manufacturing tolerances. To that point, I'd be ...


1

Based on the picture you provided, I would suggest that, if possible, you should use holes that will allow your lag bolts to go through the horizontal band of wood and the vertical post portion, as well. This will give your bolts the maximum about of solid wood to grip into. It's hard to tell from that image, but I would suspect that you used 1 by material ...


1

Most likely it does not matter, which is why they give you multiple holes, so you have some wiggle room with centering on a wall etc. But the only way to know for sure is to look at the instruction for your specific TV mount.


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