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0

I stumbled upon your question because I was looking for the exact same thing. I finally found something on Amazon, apparently "reverse hole" should do it for searching. This particular item was exactly what I was looking for as I wanted to secure these wooden "box" cabinets I have to each other (as they are currently only connected ...


0

I don't think the "concrete screw" is sufficient to anchor the heavy-duty racks. I recommend using the "wedge anchor" instead. Wedge anchors are fasteners designed for use in masonry/concrete base material that provides holding power through expansion. The anchor is inserted in a predrilled hole compress and then exerts force to create ...


5

A socket wrench is a good tool for driving concrete screws. Your hammer-drill might do the job, but if not, don't rush out to buy an impact driver if you have a socket set handy. Always buy the hex-head concrete screws.


2

When fastening to concrete I drill with a Bosch rotary hammer and then drive the screws with a battery powered impact driver. For a 5/32 drill it takes me perhaps 10 to 20s to drill 2..3in deep. It then takes another 10s to drive the screw through 1.5in lumber and into the concrete. (Numbers are very rough based on memory)


2

I'd use a self-drilling grounding screw If there truly is no 10-32 tapped hole in the box, then I'd remove the grounding wires from the box mounting screws, nut them to a pair of 12AWG bare pigtails, and land one pigtail on the GFCI's grounding screw and the other on a self-drilling grounding screw (Garvin GSST or equivalent, note that it must be 10-32 UNF ...


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A few techniques I've used successfully and depending on the materials and geometry of the situation. -For the hardest materials, grinding is better than drilling (stainless steel is pretty hard to drill) -Use a Dremel tool to cut a slot in the broken fastener shank and then use a screwdriver to back out the broken off fastener -Use a Dremel tool with an ...


3

The 1-5/8 cement board screws are much better for this purpose, as they'll go through your 3/8" shims and still have 3/4" in the stud. Even if your shims are fastened securely to the studs it's much better to have the cement board securely fastened to the studs with its own fasteners and not relying on the shim-to-stud fastener.


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Use the two part epoxy and drill a pilot hole for the self-tapper to get started in. Take care to only drill through the material, as there may be something beneath that doesn't like being drilled at the same time.


1

I would drill out the plastic and glue in a plastic rod of a suitable diameter then re-drill the hole as necessary. This does of course depend on the thickness of the material that is being worked with. Another option is to glue a fresh piece of plastic behind to give more support to the screw.


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