New answers tagged

1

This video shows retrofit steel plate fasteners to strengthen the connections you have (at 3 min): connection of beam to post


1

I don't know how they do their calculations about how long the coating lasts, but I have used some of their coated fasteners in the past and they are high quality. I would guess that the coating lasts at least as long as galvanized, so the idea that it lasts two times longer could maybe be accurate. On the other hand, if you're replacing fasteners that ...


0

Epoxy instead of wood glue irrespective of any hole filling method you use. If this is for oak door hinges, I find it hard to understand why you cannot dowel? (The dowels are hidden underneath the hinge plates).


0

I've occasionally seen toothpick style repairs and never been highly impressed with them. It kinda works, and it's cheap and easy, but the wood a toothpick is made of is nothing like your oak base material. Even with wood glue to help hold it in place the toothpick wood is still soft. A technique I've recently read about, but haven't yet tried myself, is to ...


0

Toothpicks. As I've previously answered here Slightly different question, so not a duplicate. But answer is the same.


2

I have used tooth picks and matches with glue for many years. With hard wood I use toothpicks as they are hard, match sticks with the head cut off work will work but I use those on soft wood like pine. I squirt the wood glue in push in however many I think I need then wipe the excess and insert the screws


2

Out of the three listed options I would use #3 as it is closest to the dowel method. I would also use longer screws if possible so that if only part of the hole is stripped the extra length can get more grip.


1

I would go for the dowel method. Support the door, move that face of the hinge out of the way, drill, and fit dowel with glue. Let dry, pilot drill and then use good screws.


1

First drill a hole in the center, then mount a washer with a screw in the hole. Protect the surface with thin sheet of wood and use a nail puller to pull the screw with the plastic item out of the material. Dogyu is a well known manufacturer of nail pullers with broad shovels.


3

Your picture shows a Security Torx screw head. You can find a good overview on most common screw drives for identification on a specific wikipedia page.


16

This is a tamper proof torx screw. There are torx bits with a hole in the center that will remove them, if you are bold you can try smacking the center pin with a punch at an angle (small ones usually snap off) and then a standard torx bit can be used to remove it. Check online and I bet you can find a tamper proof bit kit for under 15$.


2

Stainless steel is more brittle than the steel commonly used for screws. In some cases I have twisted off long ss screws. This may be a critical deficiency in some applications. I use stainless steel exclusively for installing grab bars in showers. These are ss screws which come with the bars. In dry situations I use whatever I have except never drywall ...


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