New answers tagged

1

If you can get to the screw hole, mix some quick setting epoxy and form it into a side. You'll have to keep forming it until it hardens. Maybe wrap some tape around the side that's not broken and make a "form" to put the epoxy in. Once it's cured, drill a hole for the screw


4

The depression you're asking about appears to be simply sloppy manufacturing to me. It doesn't seem like an intentional countersink. If it was you'd probably have flat-head screws instead. The washer goes under the nut when working with metal, not under the screw head (unless there is no nut or it's an integrated nut). The screw head should be oriented ...


0

I am going to heartily disagree with some of the other answers with an asterisk *. Yes I agree you have more control with a standard drill. Yes an impact drill does not allot you the ability to adjust torque. I agree with the other sentiments on this - I am sure there is science and facts that back this up. However asterisks alert (*)... If I have a ...


1

To answer the essence of the question (regarding which is gentler), undoubtedly the standard driver. The reason is control. You have no real control over how much torque is applied via an impact driver--it just does its thing. With a standard driver you can both modulate the motor force (assuming a modern variable trigger) and set a clutch, if available. ...


0

The Torx T45 drive is beefy enough that it's pretty safe unless the head of the screw is very very shallow, so you'll probably be fine any way you go. That said, an impact driver is far less controllable than a drill / driver. Once it starts hammering, the impact applies torque in bursts, not continuously. It's harder to control the torque by partially ...


1

Given the addendums to your question culled from comments, I would recommend a T45 Torx socket coupled with a ³⁄₈ drive socket wrench. You can use the heel of the palm of one hand to hold the socket firmly in place while applying rotation with the other hand. If the female torx bolt heads have enough paint that a solid socket-to-bolt connection is ...


1

That’s funny , sorry but force is needed to break the screw loose , an impact if at the wrong angle will cause problems as a hand held driver will. If there is paint both will damage the paint. But a t45 is large and if the bit is fully inserted and perpendicular there is really no difference as an impact only hits hard enough to get the screw moving. Once ...


0

Making sure the bit is properly engaged is the first step - square and fully seated. Then a screwdriver with the relevant torque setting is usually sufficient - only resort to heavier tools when needed ie when theycare too tight or seized.


2

Typically, 1-1/2" (about 40mm) is plenty in a wooden stud (properly piloted). It's rare that I'd go much deeper since you increase the risk of damaging electrical cables, which are centered at about 1-3/4" (45mm). Keep in mind that the holes punched in such brackets give you a clue as to their intended load range. If they were super heavy duty brackets they'...


1

Simply, a bolt is not relying on the holding strength of the threads in wood fiber. It is a metal-to-metal sandwich that is holding boards together from both sides. A bolt connection will normally be stronger than a lag screw, but that increased strength is often not needed, and access to both sides of the joint is not always possible. If there is any ...


0

This is one virtue of plastic boxes. Instead of being a 1/16" thick tab, the screw actually goes into a fairly deep mounting hole. Now, mind you, this advice is against Code since you're not supposed to modify UL-listed equipment. But I really doubt an AHJ will have a problem with it. Power off!!! I would mix a quarter-size blob of epoxy, and fold in "...


1

Given that the box is plastic, you have at least 3 options: Try a slightly larger screw. Fill the mounting hole(s) in the box with epoxy, drill a new hole, and re-mount the outlet Replace the box. If it were me, I would do number 3. Obviously, make sure the electricity to the outlet is turned off before doing any work. Edit 1 : OP says the box is metal. ...


2

If the hole is slightly stripped, then slipping some type of material in the hole to take up space might do the trick. A small sliver of card stock or paper or a very thin strand of copper wire (thin like a thread, not thick house wiring). If that doesn't work or if the hole is actually cracked wide open, you could use glue to hold the screw in place. ...


1

You might be best to just by a new one, however, one thing you could try is some plumbing tape (PTFE tape, or Teflon Tape). This tape is generally used to help seal screw connections on plumbing but could provide the extra grip between the threads needed to keep it connected.


0

Setting bolts in wet concrete is a standard practice, and using a board to hold them in place is a good idea. You absolutely do not need any epoxy when setting into wet concrete. I don't know what effect that would have, but its certainly redundant. Epoxy is used when setting anchors into preexisting hard concrete which has been drilled. Generally you ...


5

I recently found out the local name for a head like that translates to slotted flat. The screwdriver fitting those heads is an H-screwdriver. Look like this: However, for the smaller screws (with heads up to 5-6mm), it's common to simply take an old flathead screwdriver and a hacksaw. Might take a couple of minutes, but they can be made yourself quite ...


4

That is a style of head, known of as "notched spanner", most security bit sets will have bits to fit it. The bit is like a normal flatblade screwdriver but with a notch cut in the middle. Unfortunately bits generally don't work on screws that are down holes, because the bit (or worse for deep holes or short bits, the combination of bit and bit holder) ends ...


0

Remove the bracket so that you can work. Make use of the hole in the wall board to poke around in the wall to locate the nearest wall stud. Patch the hole in the wall board with some spackling paste (preferably color coordinated to the wall). Replace the bracket, lining it up with the stud. The screws placed in the wall need to be long enough to penetrate ...


3

Looks like the bracket was attached to the molding (?) with a screw that was too short. Remove the bracket carefully. You need to salvage the piece of the trim that the screw pulled out - the part behind the bracket. Glue the trim back onto the molding, then patch with some wood filler, sand, and paint. Reattach the bracket using a longer screw that goes ...


10

It is a simple security slot headed screw. A flat headed screw has part of the slot filled in to make it difficult for the average joe to undo. Either purchase a set of security bits or take an old screwdriver and grind out the matching part on the screwdriver blade so it fits neatly.


14

It looks like a spanner tamper-proof security bolt. Either buy a set of tamper-proof security bits, or modify a cheap standard slotted screwdriver with a dremel tool. Here is a cheap set: https://www.amazon.com/Performance-Tool-W8659-Security-32-Piece/dp/B002KS19PK/ A good chance that something in this set will work, but no guarantee.


4

When you "strip" a drywall hole, most likely had too much weight with either A regular screw without an anchor A cheap plastic "split" anchor A toggle bolt (the gold standard in anchors) can work around the problems created by both by Widening the hole Straddling the hole Does the wood glue and toothpick method work here? No. Wood glue is designed to ...


0

If there is space between the drywall and you are prepared to make a larger hole in both the drywall and the item you are fixing to it you could use a spring toggle in conjunction with a penny washer.


0

Depending on how much damage the stripping has done, you may be able to repair the hole with a plastic wall plug, and then screw into that. Alternatively, drill a large enough hole through the panel+drywall to insert a spring toggle wall anchor.


2

Be sure you're using the right size drill. If you are then your mortar/brick material might not be suitable for tapcons. As critical as railings are, I'd suggest lag shields and lag bolts. I've always used the stainless steel lag bolts for outdoors but galvanized are available too.


13

Drywall without anchors has very little holding power. There really isn't a method to repair stripped holes in it either. You could insert a toothpick in the hole and hold it in place while you screw in the screw and the screw would hold but not with any power. You could also use a larger screw which would cut into new drywall. None of these will give you ...


0

Yes, you are turning a 6-sided nut, but your wrench is 12-sided. That is a standard trick done with wrenches, so you don't need 60 degrees of swing, only 30 degrees. This is a box wrench end. 6 of the 12 points engage a hex nut. However, it helps to physically compress the things going together (to remove all slack) and finger-spin the nut down as far ...


3

I recently purchased and assembled two of that exact same product (except mine are the dark brown color) and had no problem with the step 5. If you look closely at the small IKEA tool it has more than 6 lobes in the tool opening so it can engage the hex nut in multiple positions. I also noticed that since the handle of the tool is offset to one side of the ...


2

I'd call it a cross-bored stud with retaining thumbscrew, but there's nothing official about that. As has been stated, it's probably a proprietary part and you likely won't find a drop-in replacement. You could fabricate one from a standard stud if you have machine tools available.


1

There is standard hardware for the job, from things like glass inserts in stair/deck railings and glass signage. Try "glass standoff bolt" in a search engine. You'd put an anchor and stud (or screw, depending on the standoff design) into the masonry and attach that hardware to/with the stud/screw. Looks decent, easy to unscrew when needed.


4

I used sleeve masonry anchors for my solar panels. Screws will not work well with concrete. Solar panels act like a sail in the wind, do not underestimate the forces involved.


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