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3

A #10 screw will be a close fit in the 10 hole and is approximately 3/16" in diameter. The tolerance on a #10 screw ranges from about 0.182" to 0.190". Gauges of this kind are not intended to make precise measurements, but to easily identify fasteners.


3

If you are speaking of the holes marked 4,5,6,8,10, these are small bolt sizes. There is 1 size missing and that is #12. Most sizes with diameters less than 3/16" are listed as number sizes. I hope this helps and is what you are asking about.


0

In addition to the light switch Greg mentioned, keep in mind that the door bell has wiring that usually runs along and or through the frame. Just drill slowly and keep checking the bell. If you remove the button cover, you might be able to determine the wire route.


0

You could use a stud finder tool. It probably won't work beside the door because of casing (trim work) overlapping the door jamb and extending onto the wall. But in typical US stick-frame construction the outermost wall stud goes the entire height from floor to ceiling. Use the stud finder to find the edge of the stud above the door, the translate that down ...


3

Most wood frame houses use at least two 2x4s or 2x6s(stud plus a jack post) plus the door frame at doors/windows. That gives minimum of a bit more than three to 3½" inches before hitting something.


7

On this style of light fixture, you'll usually find that one of the three clips is spring loaded and can be pulled horizontally away from the center. This allows you d to remove the glass. There is no need to unscrew the clips.


2

If you're talking about the metal-colored screw that sticks out parallel to the ceiling, use a nut driver: (image from Klein Tools via Google) on this hexhead (not "flat head") fastener. They're available in many sizes, and you'll need one to fit this fastener head. Props to @brhans in comments.


0

After chatting with my contractor buddy, I just decided to use normal 1.5 cap nails only where the joists are, which are 16 OC. Any other places that need it I will just use Tack 1/2 Staples.I will also tape the edges down with my fantastic 3M flashing tape to the drip edge I will have nailed down. I think that will do the trick, and not have to cut any ...


0

The portion of a screw sticking out into space doesn't have anything to hold onto, so it's not doing any good. Once the wood has been compromised enough for the threads to pull out, additional threads will just pull through the larger hole. A nail, OTOH, will continue to provide friction resisting pull-out for its entire length, as the hole generally isn't ...


2

Assuming that it is a sleeve anchor: When tightened the sleeve expands and that is what holds it into the wall: You can try to remove these by first hammering in the bolt: And then trying to pull the sleeve out using needle nose pliers: Full video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xXH-O7VBqYQ&ab_channel=Xyz A magnet can later be used to remove ...


-1

What you need first is to take the sleeve out. In some cases I was able to get pliers with small ends and pull it out, but yours looks like sitting pretty tight, so need to make it wobble or maybe pre-drill from one side to get access to the sleeve. Also, you can try jam the sleeve with rod and try to pull it out, then un-jam and repeat..


-2

Have you tried pulling the stud whilst unscrewing it? That should stop the threaded part of the shield anchor that’s inside the wall from rotating.


-1

I would recommend something this: It is for wood, but I think it will do fine with thin steel. Name should be coach bolt. Drill hole through door big enough for thread on the bolt to pass freely. But too small for the rectangular extension under the head. Insert bolt from outside of the door and screw nut from inside. The extension should extend round hole ...


1

Another thing you might try is to create an "adapter plate" to spread the load of the door closer over a larger area of the door. As you've already experienced, that this sheet metal is not capable of supporting the door-closer forces centered at the 3-4 screws on the closer. A piece of aluminum plate could be used to spread the load to 5-10 screws ...


11

I believe that they are concrete sleeve anchors, something like these†. When you screw the nut on and tighten it down, it pulls the anchor in and tightens the expanding sleeve against the hole. With no nut, there's nothing threaded down in the hole so the threaded rod just spins. I don't think you can pull those out, as the end in the wall is bigger than the ...


1

Expanding on fred_dot_u's answer... Threaded insert is an excellent choice for this application. To make the fix as robust as possible, two details to keep in mind: If you have a choice between a threaded insert that takes a machine screw (similar to a Helicoil) vs one that takes a wood screw (similar to Wall Driller drywall anchors), get the one that ...


2

Have you considered old-fashioned butterfly anchors (AKA toggle bolts)? They're fairly burly, cheap, widely available, and don't require any specialty tools, equipment, machining, etc. Note that for a foam-filled door, you would need to do some fiddling to make sure the "wings" can actually open up in there, but just sticking a scribing tool in the ...


2

Could I suggest not using screws at all, and using something like 3M VHB (Very High Bonding) tape? Some varieties are stronger than rivets, at least according to 3M, and is used in a lot of places where rivets used to be used, such as in attaching various parts of cars to the frame, or in bonding parts of airplane wings together. See https://www.3m.com/3M/...


7

Since security could be a concern, I'd suggest a plate on the outside with square holes punched, or round holes drilled to accept carriage bolts that go all the way through the door and nuts on the inside. This will prevent anyone from being able to remove bolts from the outside. If you drill a clearance hole through the plate, you can use a file to square ...


14

This appears to be well suited to a rivnut installation. The threaded insert is placed in a hole sized appropriately to the insert, the tool is used to compress the portion inside the door and the threads remain for the bolt to engage. Rivnuts are best used on thin sheet material. Rivnut tools can be quite expensive, but those are primarily for production ...


15

Any type of threaded screw will eventually pull out. I'd think about using some bolt and cap nuts. You'd have to drill right through the door and can probably use the same holes on one side. I'd think about adding a few washers on each side for a little extra strength.


0

If you have a plaster ceiling and it's in good shape, not coming away from the lath anywhere, there are some screw types and techniques that could reasonably hold weight like this. I don't recommend it but it's possible and you need to experiment to find what works well in your plaster. It varies. If you do this, also follow the advice below for the FIRST ...


0

Engineer (a Japanese company) makes a series of pliers specifically designed for screw removal, called the ネジザウルス ("Nejisaurus," lit. "Screwsaurus"). One example is the PZ-58 (English page, Amazon US page). These have ridges or serrations oriented perpendicular to most pliers which allows a better grip for rotating the gripped item around ...


1

Assuming this is a regular Phillips head, you can buy reverse-threaded bits that fit into the stripped part. They grip the screw inside the stripped head and help power it out. A slightly more radical solution is drilling. You'll need a good metal bit that is at least the diameter of the shaft of the screw. If your screw is protruding (like the picture ...


5

Back in my military aircraft maintenance days, we would use these awesome tools we called a 'Johnson Bar'. Uses leverage to extract a stuck screw, bolt etc. Usually fom the last guy that monkeyed them down too hard. Might be a bit overkill for the average person and their issues but if you are dealing with this all the time, then perhaps it is a wise ...


1

If going to plug up hole and redrill, I find that some shim stock, sold for framing purposes works great. I use a utility knife to cut strips, and then pack them into the existing hole with some wood glue. The next day I predrill holes for the screws. If the screws are badly rusted, I try to find replacements. If there are three bad hinges, it's sometimes ...


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