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I am going to heartily disagree with some of the other answers with an asterisk *. Yes I agree you have more control with a standard drill. Yes an impact drill does not allot you the ability to adjust torque. I agree with the other sentiments on this - I am sure there is science and facts that back this up. However asterisks alert (*)... If I have a ...


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To answer the essence of the question (regarding which is gentler), undoubtedly the standard driver. The reason is control. You have no real control over how much torque is applied via an impact driver--it just does its thing. With a standard driver you can both modulate the motor force (assuming a modern variable trigger) and set a clutch, if available. ...


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The Torx T45 drive is beefy enough that it's pretty safe unless the head of the screw is very very shallow, so you'll probably be fine any way you go. That said, an impact driver is far less controllable than a drill / driver. Once it starts hammering, the impact applies torque in bursts, not continuously. It's harder to control the torque by partially ...


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Given the addendums to your question culled from comments, I would recommend a T45 Torx socket coupled with a ³⁄₈ drive socket wrench. You can use the heel of the palm of one hand to hold the socket firmly in place while applying rotation with the other hand. If the female torx bolt heads have enough paint that a solid socket-to-bolt connection is ...


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That’s funny , sorry but force is needed to break the screw loose , an impact if at the wrong angle will cause problems as a hand held driver will. If there is paint both will damage the paint. But a t45 is large and if the bit is fully inserted and perpendicular there is really no difference as an impact only hits hard enough to get the screw moving. Once ...


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Making sure the bit is properly engaged is the first step - square and fully seated. Then a screwdriver with the relevant torque setting is usually sufficient - only resort to heavier tools when needed ie when theycare too tight or seized.


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Short answer: not really. With phillips or flathead tips, no; getting full torque with these depend on you pushing the tip of the driver into the screw to keep the driver tip from camming out. However if you get the screw in most of the way and just have to do the final tightening with a regular driver, it might be worth using. With square, hex, or ...


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I recently found out the local name for a head like that translates to slotted flat. The screwdriver fitting those heads is an H-screwdriver. Look like this: However, for the smaller screws (with heads up to 5-6mm), it's common to simply take an old flathead screwdriver and a hacksaw. Might take a couple of minutes, but they can be made yourself quite ...


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That is a style of head, known of as "notched spanner", most security bit sets will have bits to fit it. The bit is like a normal flatblade screwdriver but with a notch cut in the middle. Unfortunately bits generally don't work on screws that are down holes, because the bit (or worse for deep holes or short bits, the combination of bit and bit holder) ends ...


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The problem with any flex drive anything is that you must hold position against two things now: the handle and the head. If you don't hold the head in place, it just flops right out. You run out of hands in a hurry!


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I have often used offset screwdrivers:


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I have had one for 45 years and have used it a lot. It was part of a screwdriver/socket set I got from my little sister for Christmas. The screwdriver bits are not as effective because you can't put your weight behind it and the bits have a tendency to turn out of the screw in some cramped places. It works very good with the sockets because the torque is ...


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The problem with any screwdriver including your flex (radius)screw driver is that nothing really works all of the time, or better yet how it is advertised. You will usually find its really a mater of space and access. What I have discovered is to use the fixture disconnect we are now installing on commercial fluorescent or LED fixtures. This way you install ...


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It is a simple security slot headed screw. A flat headed screw has part of the slot filled in to make it difficult for the average joe to undo. Either purchase a set of security bits or take an old screwdriver and grind out the matching part on the screwdriver blade so it fits neatly.


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It looks like a spanner tamper-proof security bolt. Either buy a set of tamper-proof security bits, or modify a cheap standard slotted screwdriver with a dremel tool. Here is a cheap set: https://www.amazon.com/Performance-Tool-W8659-Security-32-Piece/dp/B002KS19PK/ A good chance that something in this set will work, but no guarantee.


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