28

drilled a 6 mm hole in the masonry, then used brown wall plugs and #8 screws Your hole was too small and the screw was the wrong size or type. A #8 screw has a 4mm diameter. Brown wall plugs fit into a hole made by a 7mm drill bit and are for screw sizes 10 - 14 Plug Hole Screw Colour Size Size ------ --...


21

If you are concerned about the presence of wiring near where you are installing this, grab yourself a stud finder with "live wire" detection from your local hardware store. Entry level models are inexpensive. This way, you can find the studs and the wires. More expensive models may also detect other services (e.g. metal plumbing or gas pipes). If you are ...


18

It is possible that there are several reasons for the screw head destruction. You may be using an electrical tool that is not at all suitable for driving screws. Some tools designed for drilling holes are not going to offer enough torque at a low enough speed to properly drive screws. If your tool starts out with a huge burst of speed it can almost ...


18

It is called a "hex key", "Allen key", or "Allen wrench". You can also find socket wrench tools with this hexagonal drive shape. Hex key socket wrenches are almost always stronger than Allen keys, and less likely to round out the screw head. Both the fasteners and the tools shipped with Ikea furniture kits are necessarily the cheapest that can still do ...


16

This is a tamper proof torx screw. There are torx bits with a hole in the center that will remove them, if you are bold you can try smacking the center pin with a punch at an angle (small ones usually snap off) and then a standard torx bit can be used to remove it. Check online and I bet you can find a tamper proof bit kit for under 15$.


14

You may have some luck with a screw extractor. They come in various styles - here are two of them: The extractors are designed to screw themselves down into the head of the screw while at the same time applying torque on the screw in the direction that would loosen the screw. Your described screw had a hex socket type hole so the extractor may be ready to ...


14

It looks like a spanner tamper-proof security bolt. Either buy a set of tamper-proof security bits, or modify a cheap standard slotted screwdriver with a dremel tool. Here is a cheap set: https://www.amazon.com/Performance-Tool-W8659-Security-32-Piece/dp/B002KS19PK/ A good chance that something in this set will work, but no guarantee.


12

The bit that you are asking about is what is called a "concave Phillips" or "inverted Phillips" bit. They are used for removing screws that look like this: (picture found at ebuy7.com) The cross pattern on the screw head is actually raised.


11

I wouldn't worry too much. Modern electrical standards have wire stapled an inch and a bit back from the interior of the drywall. If your screws are less than 1.5" long, you shouldn't hit anything. If you are pre-drilling for drywall plugs, only go 5/8" in. It's ideal (and still safe) if you get one screw into a stud. There should be one either on the left ...


10

It is a simple security slot headed screw. A flat headed screw has part of the slot filled in to make it difficult for the average joe to undo. Either purchase a set of security bits or take an old screwdriver and grind out the matching part on the screwdriver blade so it fits neatly.


9

Abrasive paste as sold in car repair shops to use when grinding in valves in cylinder heads is great for screw heads that are 'worn'. Place a small dab on the screwdriver head before trying to unscrew the item. The friction from the abrasive in the paste will help the screwdriver 'grab' the worn screw slot..


9

Those little bits aren't really made to go straight into the chuck. Even if the chuck is made to grip the little grooves, it's hard to see the tip with it so close to the chuck. There might not be enough room to get the whole nose of the driver in that close to the screw. Those bits are best put into a bitholder - the bitholder will grip the little ...


8

Is this an impact driver? If not, Lower the torque setting on the drill. Use the correct sized bit for the screw. For Phillips head screws there are several sizes. If you are using a Pozidriv screw, use a Pozidriv bit. Sometimes you can use a square drive bit with Pozidriv, but using a Phillips bit will generally cause the bits to cam out. Try using ...


8

The Phillips screwdriver size is based on the size at the very tip. Based on diagrams of the tip from the original Phillips patent (shown in one of the links to sizes.com), I'm guessing that the relevant physical size is the cross you see when you point the screwdriver at your nose (as though it were a screw) and look at it end-on, or something directly ...


8

I usually just cut a slot in the screw head with a Dremel or similar rotary cuttter, and then use a regular screwdriver to unscrew.


7

If the head is readily accessible you can use a fine toothed metal saw to cut a groove with which you then can use a regular flat screwdriver to unscrew.


7

You realize that they make screwdriver bits to go into drills that will also go into the chuck of your hand drill. You can get longer bits that will fit easily into the chuck, for example: You can also get magnetic extenders that will fit into the chuck and then hold a standard bit: Note: photos are only examples and are not an endorsement of Sony product.


7

"M" screws are all metric, by standard. The number following the M is the outer diameter of the screw threads, in millimeters, so an M4 screw's threads have an outer diameter of 4mm. See Wikipedia for more information.


6

For screws that held the original hinge in an old wood door, and would not budge, even with the advice above, I aimed a hair dryer at the screw for a few minutes (thinking that perhaps the wood was damp and that was holding the screw in; could also have been something about heat since I often run hot water over stuck screw tops). Anyway, it worked, with only ...


6

Congratulations on becoming a home owner. You will soon learn to use lots of tools if you plan to do any DIY projects around the house. Most locksets only require a #2 Phillips screwdriver. You should not need any special or expensive tools. Just read the directions and follow them. Changing locks is very simple, usually just two screws that hold the inner ...


6

The picture may say it all, I think you will be hard pressed to find a replacement fan. There is not a whole lot to do with these type of fans.


6

You can but it would be easier and more efficient to bring a manual wrench. A wrench or ratchet will let you apply your torque closer to the same plane as the head of the bolt. Turning the drill will be like a ratchet with an extension on it. Use the right tool for the job, your tools, your watch, and your wallet will thank you for it!


5

00 refers to the size and angle of the tip. It doesn't say how thick the tip becomes before merging into the shaft. So, yes, these could both be 00 sized, if they fit the same screws; the thicker one just (a) will fit larger 00 screws better than the small one would and (b) won't fit into as small an opening.


5

I have just finished renovating an outdoor furniture set. This involved removing and replacing about 180 wood screws. The things I found that worked best are: Clean around the screw head as much as possible, to free it up from anything around it. Wood screws can become embedded, and the wood covering them hardens over the years, especially if oil/varnish/...


5

Screwdriver bits are generally considered consumable. Regardless of the brand, they eventually break/wear out. Hardware stores sell them in packs of 5-10 for exactly that reason. I wouldn't put too much stock in what kind of tool the bit originally came with. The only exception is if you're using an impact driver you might want to be a little more picky. ...


5

First of all, make sure you are using the correct bit on your electric screwdriver. If the screws have a cross-shaped head, check whether you need a Philips or a Pozidriv bit for it. Pozidriv has an additional "X" shape on the screw, and using the wrong kind of bit will cause slippage. There are many online guides how to identify the proper bit, such as this ...


5

You need a pin wrench (or pin spanner). They come in fixed and adjustable types. Images and links are illustrative only, not an endorsement of goods or sources.


5

I recently found out the local name for a head like that translates to slotted flat. The screwdriver fitting those heads is an H-screwdriver. Look like this: However, for the smaller screws (with heads up to 5-6mm), it's common to simply take an old flathead screwdriver and a hacksaw. Might take a couple of minutes, but they can be made yourself quite ...


5

Good question! Your primary goal is to assure that you do not have a screw it a wire, and become "hot" possibly electrocuting someone at an inopportune time! The secondary goal is to get a sound mechanical connection for your holder. As pointed out by another poster, generally, but not all the time, there is a stud on the right or left of an outlet. ...


4

Some times tightening the screw helps un stick it.I don't mean turning it a full quarter tighten but use some force. If you hear it click/budge a bit- Spray WD-40 on it then untighten it, spray WD-40(only a short spray-don't drown it), repeat over and over and the distance will get larger and larger and eventually you will be able to unscrew with ease. By ...


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