Hot answers tagged

33

"Dirt", really soil, is made up of components that varies by locale, but almost always contains a significant amount of silica and other silicates, in the form of sand or finely ground quartz. It also contains other hard minerals in addition to softer organic materials. Silica and silicates are the same materials that are used in abrasives, such as ...


33

High tooth count will give smooth results in most cases, but they can heat up in hard wood. More teeth leads to more friction. It's probably a fine all purpose blade, but ripping a hardwood like oak, especially very thick boards, is probably a reason to use a dedicated ripping blade. Ripping blades have 24-30 teeth, and the tooth profile is flat on top. ...


32

The filling is melted aluminum that galled/melted and filled the gullet and is covering one of the Tungsten Carbide teeth. You can pull it off with a pliers. The negative rake angle of the blade is fine for cutting aluminum, it will push your workpiece away instead of tending to grab onto it. It will generate more heat and be more likely to melt the ...


28

Cut it perpendicularly. 70 degrees from 90 degrees (ie: a right angle) is 20 degrees. Square the end of your taper and put a mark in the middle. Set your saw on 20 degrees and place the mark so that the taper makes a T with the cutting rail, cut one side, flip the taper over, cut the other. If you're concerned about stability - make an L shaped jig which ...


21

Check that your rip fence is parallel to the blade. If not, you could be forcing the workpiece into the blade as you feed.


18

Yes the J shape is supposed to be there for expansion. If you look at a Diablo blade it has the J relief cuts at the edges and also d-shaped relief cuts within the body of the blade. The large tooth looks like it may be build up of aluminum on the carbide tooth. It definitely doesn't look like carbide. If it is Aluminum it should be easy to pull off with a ...


16

It has to do with how far back the blade goes on the down (non cutting) stroke. It's usually called the "Pendulum Stroke adjustment." The idea being that it will move the blade back, out of the way of the material on the down stroke. It reduces the load on the saw when cutting thick materials, at the cost of a bit more splintering. Use a setting of 0 ...


16

Whenever I want an arc that accurate I use my 3hp router (a smaller rated router will do too, just for smaller scale work) screwed to a shop made pivot (trammel) and make repeated passes, next pass deeper than the last to complete the cut. A circular saw may make that tight of a curve if you set the saw shallow enough to just cut through the material. It ...


14

Jig saws are for delicate work; they cut slow and the blades like to bend and break. Reciprocating saws are for not delicate work and cut fast, the blades bend if you let the tip of the blade bounce on your work. Circular saws are for relatively straight cuts, their blades do not break or bend, readily. Table saws are just better circular saws. Miter ...


13

While I appreciate this isn't an answer to the question, I'd like to point out that power tool safety is as much a state of mind as anything. All saws (with the possible exception of the sawstop and similar systems) can bite you, and correspondingly, all saws can be used safely. So, my advice is to learn from experts how to use your chosen saw. Don't slip ...


12

A heap isn't very descriptive as per quantity, so I am going to assume that this is akin to a buttload. A chainsaw really is your best option as they are designed for quick, rough cuts. Also, the blades last for a very long time. A large reciprocating saw will also do the job just fine but will take longer and go through some blades. Also, the vibration ...


12

Rip cutting a length of hardwood like oak is a much tougher job than cross cutting and you're trying to cut through a very thick piece. Note this is dangerous on a table saw, and especially if there's high feed resistance. Do not push harder to feed faster hoping to avoid the burn marks! Instead, you have to avoid the situation that is overworking your ...


10

At the risk of sounding like a complete idiot why don't you clamp a block to the saw fence so that the stake is skewed 10 degrees when flat against the block and fence? Then you can just set the saw at 60 and chop. For cutting hundreds of them a circular saw may be quicker and easier though. Once you know the length of the taper you can place a bunch of ...


9

A hack saw is a fine tool to cut fairly thin gauge tubing (which this seems to be). You may want to use a jig of some sort, such as a miterbox, to keep your cut square to the piece. Tape around the diameter to minimize chipping of the finish. File down the cut edge to remove the burrs from sawing, using a metal file, followed by emory paper. If there is a ...


9

The factory edge on a fresh sheet of plywood is very straight. So use that. Option 0: Snap a chalk line and cut by hand. Fine if you're doing sheathing, but not accurate enough for many other tasks. Option 1: Use 2 sheets of plywood. Stack one on the other, offset by ~32". Use the top one as a guide to cut the bottom one. Option 2: Make an 8' ripping ...


9

How do professionals cut arcs? They don't use a saw to cut them. If you're the IKEA kind of professional, you have a monstrous milling machine. You program the arc into your CNC machine, and it just happens. If you're a carpenter, you rough-saw to the basic shape you want, plus a bit spare. Then you use a spokeshave, which is essentially a plane for curved ...


8

Back in the day when I used to put up vinyl siding, I found that the best way to cut it with a circular saw was with a cheap 140 tooth plywood blade installed backwards (to give the teeth a negative rake and prevent chipping): For really hard plastics, I've used a diamond abrasive blade before and that did a great job (these are incredibly expensive if we'...


8

It's entirely possible, and often reasonable. Without going as far as buying a CNC router (handy, but expensive) simple jigs and sleds permit cutting precisely circular holes (eat your heart out, jigsaws) and precisely straight edges (like a tablesaw with no need to use a jointer afterwards - indeed, many people with tablesaws use a router jig to joint ...


8

This doesn't have anything to do with saws, but it's too long for a comment. Instead of trying to come up with a better stake, maybe come up with a completely different solution. My first thought at seeing the "penetrating hard clay soil" was to use a wood/spade drill bit to drill a pilot hole in the ground before trying to tamp in the stake. There are ...


8

Examine the blade disk to see if it has become gummy or coated with resin. You may have to remove the blade and scrub it clean. If the saw is not new the blade may be quite worn and need replacement. The teeth of a saw are bent slightly to the side (usually every other tooth to each side) to make the cut wider than the saw blade. Sometimes a saw blade ...


7

jigsaw. but really i think you underestimate how easy it is to cut through dimensional lumber with a sharp handsaw.


7

I used an arm screwed to my router to cut a curve in a benchtop, it worked well. The same technique could be applied to a jigsaw. screw a wooden block to the side of your jigsaws foot screw an arm to the block coming off at 90 degrees to the cutting direction. mesure the radius you want from the blade along the arm and put a pin (nail) through it at that ...


7

Your jigsaw can do the job, but it's far too prone to wander for a perfect line. But you can rough cut it below the line and then use some sanding to get it to the line you want. I would buy a new blade for this and make sure it has a high tooth count and/or is listed for fine or scroll cuts (if you're a masochist, you can try with a metal cutting blade, but ...


6

It can be done, but to use a router to cut wood is not optimum. Jigging a router can be more complex and a router will usually cut out a much wider swath and create way more sawdust and wood chips. The router will also cut much slower in thicker materials and has big learning curve issues regarding proper direction of cut. When you start considering a ...


6

There could be several issues that cause the blade other than a dull blade, you have hit on squeezing the blade with the rip fence and chip board will get chewed up a little even with some squeeze, since it’s not that a loose belt is another possibility and the last thing I have seen a few times is the pulley on the motor shaft or the saw arbor is loose, ...


5

One of the most important things about making a stool is getting the legs the same length. I would suggest you modify the miter box something like this: Keep everything square when building the stop piece. Then when you actually go to cut the legs, butt a square end to the stop, clamp it down, and cut. You will get three or four legs precisely the same ...


5

Just used a 28v cordless Milwaukee reciprocating saw to cut up a half cord of 14 month seasoned live oak firewood. Had to use several 9" and 12" Diablo pruning blades, but the sawzall was outstanding. I cut through logs up to 10" in diameter. It's not the quickest way to cut logs, but safer than a chainsaw in my opinion. Still have all my fingers!


5

I've used the single wheel version of this before, and it works fine. Pros: Simple design. Just like using a utility knife to score a line, you cut your circle out on both sides, and then punch out the hole. Perfectly round holes. Cons: Slower. To make the cuts at the same place, you drill a small hole in the center and then align the cutout tool on that ...


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