New answers tagged

1

Yeah, that's totally fine. You do that all the time with restorative surface prep, alternating layers of epoxy primer, "bondo" (Abatron, West System ultralight filler etc.), sanding, primer, bondo, rinse wash repeat. Though honestly, the best thing you can possibly do with a rickety old garage is stabilize it. Why? Because stabilizing an old building is ...


4

I would forget about power tools and get a 1" chisel. Trace out the area with pencil and shave out the area with the chisel. You're talking about a very small area so it shouldn't take long. Afterwards, smooth out with a sanding block. As always, wear a dust mask when sanding.


0

Use a reciprocating saw to cut the fasteners holding one of the sill/fire-block boards in place. Run the blade right through the drywall; making a slot, right where the two boards meet. The top board would be the ideal choice, as it can't fall inside the wall, when the fasteners are cut, that hold it in place. If a cripple stud is in the center, trim one of ...


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Check out Diamabrush (https://diamabrush.com/). I used one in an angle grinder to strip 7 layers of sander clogging paint from 700sqft of pine flooring. It worked great.


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You might want to try a scraper, which will do particularly well with corners. In the current era, a scraper with a reversible & replaceable tungsten carbide blade is probably your best bet unless you really enjoy sharpening/burnishing a steel scraper. A scraper can do the whole job, or assist with those parts of the job that other methods do not ...


1

I've had great results using Citristrip, (see below). I've used it indoors many times and it leaves no fumes. I've used it to strip multiple layers of paint and varnish from furniture. There are many products to choose from but I know this one works. It just goes on with a brush. Good luck, you took on a big job redoing a staircase. This product looks ...


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On an aesthetic view, would leaving them look nice and authentic/rustic? YES Furniture finishers go to great lengths to achieve what is called a distressed look. They poke holes, lash with chains, beat upon with sticks, etc. to achieve a finish that you get for free! That being said, if your decor motif is ultra-clean/modern; a rustic distressed look may ...


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A good filler will work for the nail holes but probably won't help with the black spots because there's not enough depth for the filler to take hold. Be sure to get a filler that will take stain as many don't. These stairs were probably meant to be carpeted from the start so quality lumber wasn't used. Your best bet would be to buy/rent a belt sander and ...


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If what you need to do is 'increase the height of the hole by a quarter inch', then the safest solution is to get a replacement medicine cabinet that will fit in the existing hole. If that's not possible, then use a saw to remove the stud that's in the way. After that, you'll need to repair the inevitable drywall damage that'll be left by the saw. This will ...


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