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15

A typical spindle sander rotates at between 100 and 2,000 RPM, where a router is much faster 8,000 to 35,000 RPM. So I would say this is probably not the best idea, and could lead to damage to the equipment, injury, and death.


14

The short ends you pictured are the cross grains of the board. What I see is that you have used a too coarse sandpaper on these edges. This should be easy to fix. You need to step down the grit of the sandpaper. Any final sanding should be done with 220 or 320 paper. On these end details, use fine paper, break its (paper's) back so it is flexible, and take ...


13

You might use a half-round rasp or file.


11

Hand-plane before you sand. A good sharp plane and good technique produces a very nice finish. Only light sanding required after that. Don't plane after sanding, the leftover grit will dull your blade. Other than that, it's about elbow grease.


11

The general method I use to make a bigger hole is to take a scrap piece of plywood (1/4" works great) or pegboard or similar that is a bit bigger than the hole, clamp/screw/hold it in place, then use the correct size hole saw to drill through that and into the board. This gives enough of a start to keep the hole saw in place to drill the rest of the way ...


10

When you say you can see the brush marks, do you mean that they're actually irregularly surfaced? I mean - are we talking just a visual effect or an actual difference in the depth of the paint? If the latter, do a skim coat with lightweight joint compound and when it dries, either lightly sand OR smooth with a large, slightly damp sponge, then apply primer....


9

A block plane might work but you're going to have a very tough time taking down 1cm of wood over such a long length. If you do use a plane, go in small increments and make sure you keep your blade as sharp as possible. A belt sander will work better, provided you use 40 or 60 grit sandpaper. Anything higher (smoother) and it will take you an eternity. My ...


9

Thank you to everyone for your insight! I made a quick stop at the Lowes down the street and picked up a few inexpensive options you all mentioned. The one that absolutely stood out for my purposes was the drill rasp. As soon as I began I knew it was the one. I went back over 4 holes, each taking about 1-2 minutes to effectively widen and shape. I was very ...


8

A cheap and easy solution would be to strap an air filter to a box fan and run it in the room for awhile. I've seen several variations of the basic concept. Here is one example: Build a do-it-yourself air purifier for about $25


8

It is not feasible to sand down a wooden member by a whole half of an inch. If something is too long then cut off the additional half inch using a saw. If something is too thick (wide) by the half inch then rip saw off that extra thickness or use a planer to remove it. If you cut something too short you will have to go get a replacement piece and re-cut ...


7

Release the paper-clamp latches. There will be one or two latches on both sides of the sander. For that model, they probably look like this (note the 2 red arrows, showing the release motion): Pull the folded-over edges, of the sandpaper, out from under the clamps. That model may use velcro paper, so expect that you might have to peel the sandpaper off of ...


7

I had two floors to do once and between coats I used a broom with 3 bits of fine sanding paper taped to the broom head - cheap, cheerful and effective... Also, had to punch down the floor brads (nails) so they were below the surface... Those floors came up magic but also vacuumed after sanding to remove the dust...


7

You could use a hand-held orbital- like you mentioned the biggest downside is time. But you're correct, sanding between coats of poly isn't stripping an old floor- it's just scuffing up the previous coat of poly in preparation for the next one. Even easier for this step though would probably be a pole sander- like the kind for drywall seams. Use a fine ...


6

HEPA air purifiers are like low-pressure, high-volume shop vacs and are great for this. They average about $150 and you can find them at just about any large store. Very useful for clearing allergens and dust particles.


6

I really think a palm sander is the wrong tool for this job. Palm sanders are great for finishing with finer grits but lack the power to remove layers of paint quickly. The siding job you are starting would go a lot faster with a 5 or 6 inch dual action (DA) sander with prepunched velcro backed sandpaper disks. There are several nice ones for under $100 and ...


6

As @Nick2253 commented, sanding between coats promotes better adhesion of the next coat. This occurs because a rougher surface has more area and "features" for the next coat to grab onto. That's why it's easier to scrape paint off of a smooth surface like glass than a relatively rough one like wood. Sanding also helps remove any bumps from dust that's ...


5

Sanding is best done after the floor is laid. This enables you to get a flat finish across all the boards which would be difficult if not impossible to achieve by sanding prior to installation. If you have any particularly rough boards then you might want to sand them first - but it's not essential. You should be able to hire a drum sander and an edge ...


5

There's a fascinating article in Fine Homebuilding # 221, pg. 73, where they torture test various brands of sandpaper discs and find that there's a HUGE gap in performance between the stuff that you can buy at Lowe's (Gator) and the stuff you can find only at good woodworking/tool stores or online (Mirka and Klingspor). I've typically used Mirka when I can ...


5

I think your best bet is to use a sanding process to open up the hole. It may take a while but should get you there eventually. When I had a similar problem I took a piece of 1/2 inch diameter birch dowel rod (about nine inches long) and cut a slot across its end. Then inserted a folded over piece of sand paper to make a two sided flap sander. Chucked into ...


5

Depends on the quality of the existing finish... if it's as flat as you want it to be, then I'd kiss it with 150 on a pole sander. Link for illustration purposes only: there are many out there... If you need to knock down blobs/ runs/ etc, then start with 120 on the handheld random orbit sander. Work your way up to 150/220. Vacuum and then wipe with a ...


5

You'll probably want to rent a proper floor sander. A small random-orbit will take ages and you'll probably burn through most of its useful life. The sander should come with a variety of paper grits. As with any woodworking project, start with the heaviest and transition to the finest. The final should be somewhere in the 100-120 grit range. More ...


5

Gypsum drywall and it's paper covering, spackle and joint compound are much softer than wood (except perhaps balsa) and produce a lot of dust that clumps together and sticks to sandpaper, rather than falling off as wood shavings do. The "holey" sanding sheets allow dust to fall through and therefore last longer on drywall. However, they can be used ...


5

Finishing with a low grit sandpaper like 40 grit or 60 grit will leave too many scratches on the floor, making it rough. When you apply stain and finish, these scratches will actually be visible. Use the 40 grit and 60 grit for surfacing, then finish with 100 grit or 120 grit. Especially with stain, which will pick up on scratches, you don't want to skip the ...


4

If the holes are already patched and all your are doing is sanding it down to a smooth finish before you prime, it will be way less than 5 minutes per patch. Personally I would do it myself but how valuable your time is something only you can answer. If you get the sand paper made specifically for sanding joint compound (like this it will go really fast. ...


4

Lots of good answers here. I was a finisher in a cabinet shop for many years and this is how used to do it. Avoid anything with silicone to get on your hands or near your wood project. It causes fish eye dimple defects in your clear coat and will ruin the finish. Such items with silicone include lubricants, water repellent sprays, etc. Wash your hands ...


4

Orbit diameter is related to how aggressively the sander removes material; the larger the orbit, the quicker it removes material (all else held equal). This article on American Woodworker's site seems to agree. It also mentions that larger orbits leave more visible swirl marks. However, orbit size is not the only determining factor in how quickly material ...


4

For getting paint off a door, I highly recommend using Citrus Strip. We tried it on our old wooden door and it worked great, taking off multiple layers of paint. It doesn't work as well under a lot of sun and heat, so I would recommend either taking the door off the hinges or erecting some sort of tarp to block the sun from hitting it directly. Then get a ...


4

Wet Sanding If you want a smooth surface, you could try wet sanding it. Purchase a drywall sanding sponge (~$4.00 at any home improvement store), and use that for the final sanding pass. Fill a bucket with water. Dunk the sponge in the water, and then wring it out to remove as much excess water as possible. Using a light circular motion, buff the compound ...


4

Three methods I can think of. Enlarge by friction Your idea of wrapping the bit in sandpaper isn't even bad. The only "right" way to do this is a different bit, and that's not even worht it. You just probably used the wrong sandpaper. Try some 80 grit and make sure to go in a back and forth pattern, roughly every half inch you plunge. There also exists ...


4

The drying times on the can are usually very optimistic in my experience. They sometimes state the drying conditions the times are intended for, like 78 ºF and <20% humidity. If you are colder and/or more humid you will have to wait longer. Definitely do not sand if the finish is tacky. There's no harm in giving it extra time to dry. At this point I ...


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