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11

Hand-plane before you sand. A good sharp plane and good technique produces a very nice finish. Only light sanding required after that. Don't plane after sanding, the leftover grit will dull your blade. Other than that, it's about elbow grease.


10

An advantage of the disk over the belt is that you can control how aggressive the sanding is by moving the point of contact between the edge of the disk (where the speed is highest) and the middle (where it is lowest). The downside of the disk sander (pun intended) is you can only safely use the half of the disk that is pushing the work down onto the table. ...


9

A block plane might work but you're going to have a very tough time taking down 1cm of wood over such a long length. If you do use a plane, go in small increments and make sure you keep your blade as sharp as possible. A belt sander will work better, provided you use 40 or 60 grit sandpaper. Anything higher (smoother) and it will take you an eternity. My ...


7

Release the paper-clamp latches. There will be one or two latches on both sides of the sander. For that model, they probably look like this (note the 2 red arrows, showing the release motion): Pull the folded-over edges, of the sandpaper, out from under the clamps. That model may use velcro paper, so expect that you might have to peel the sandpaper off of ...


7

When rotated, that lever should lift the bar it is mounted to. You then slip the edge of the sandpaper under the bar and rotate the lever back, the bar will pinch the paper under it. Pull the paper taut and repeat on the other side of the sander to secure.


5

Finishing with a low grit sandpaper like 40 grit or 60 grit will leave too many scratches on the floor, making it rough. When you apply stain and finish, these scratches will actually be visible. Use the 40 grit and 60 grit for surfacing, then finish with 100 grit or 120 grit. Especially with stain, which will pick up on scratches, you don't want to skip the ...


4

Because of the different motions, a belt sander could cause a deeper "line" where the edge of the belt hits the wood, since you can only go back and forth with it, certainly not optimal. With an orbital sander you would be moving it very quickly, in different directions and because of the way the pad moves as well, you would not be "eating" into the wood as ...


3

Assuming you're using the correct adhesive system for the pad, there are two instances where this will happen: 1) Your pad is old and will no longer hook the loop, you'll have to replace the pad, generally about 15$ and you can easily do it yourself. 2) Your pad is incompatible with the sander you're using(rare if you're using the same system). It happens ...


2

You will need: Carbide scrapers of different sizes Paint spray gun (will save you TONS of time) Several good quality brushes -- edging and flat shapes Wood hardener for any isolated rotted spots of wood Wood filler or bondo to spot-patch rotted areas Extra replacement siding Saw(s) -- circular, oscillating multitool, etc Hammer, nails (galvanized) Aluminum ...


2

While I would be lost without a belt sander and a detail sander, for most medium to fine finishing work, I would vote for a variable speed, 6" random orbit sander, with velcro pad (as opposed to PSA (pressure sensitive adhesive). Get one with 6 hole dust pickup for integration with a shop vac, such as.. What are the relative ad/disadvantages of random ...


2

It looks like you neither sanded with the grain or used a fine enough sandpaper in order to prepare for staining. I think you have to go sand it down and start over. Those likely would have been visible before staining.


2

Your Drill Chuck is actually the problem here. You can try a few different things. Buy a new chuck for that drill. Buy a new high quality drill. Since your spindle is damaged already, you might want to put a groove in it for your chuck to bite into it. I have no relation or affiliation with any of the following - I am supplying the links so you can see ...


1

I think "round hand sanding pad" or "round sanding block" get you there. Google 1 | Google 2


1

Looks like mill scale. It's normally removed prior to riveting, welding and painting. It is metal oxide but it's a pretty good rust barrier in the short term. Painting over mill scale works well... For awhile... But when it fails, the mill scale turns against you; being moist and trapped under paint, it rusts progressively under the paint, making ever ...


1

I would NEVER use a belt sander for finish work especially with polyurethane. Can it be done , not with 220 grit and possibly not even with 400 grit. Belt Sanders rip a line with each grain of the paper trying to blend a rough wood to prepare for finish is tough enough but I would say just hand sand the poly before using a belt sander or you will be starting ...


1

I've sorted this out now, and in case I mislead anyone else with this, there was NOT a broken down flexible linkage in there, it was just compacted sawdust as some have suggested. The problem was just a sticky bearing which I've now freed up and all is good.


1

https://www.boschtools.com/us/en/service/replacement-parts/ Bosch may have a answer. i have had lots of lock using PERMATEX Right Stuff. Silicone based, fast drying, strong and dependable.


1

Anything that sands across the grain on wood puts scratches in the growth rings that can be hard to remove. Orbital sanders are good for removing homogenous materials like paint where you don't want a pattern to the marks left by the sand paper. As you use finer paper, the random action leaves finer scratches till the surface is smooth. Finish sanding on ...


1

Suppose the black square is the area to be planed from the plywood, then cut near the 4 edges of near the square with 45 degree angle (2 bottom edges is done for reference in the attached figure) with a hacksaw blade or whatever and finish with a hand file (not really necessary). Later plane across the square as usual. The edges will look almost good, ...


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