Hot answers tagged

63

OSHA has a search engine. Many accidents are not reported to OSHA, in particular, amateur/homeowner operators like you don't have a reporting chain to OSHA. But here are those OSHA knows about. Obviously the vast majority involve the operator injuring others. I omitted them since you say you'll be a lone worker (which has its own set of risks...) The ...


63

From the linked assembly instructions: Screw(s) and plug(s) for the wall are not included. Assess the suitability of the wall to ensure that it will withstand the forces generated. Use screw(s) and plug(s) suitable for your walls and the intended load. If you are uncertain, seek professional advice. Read and follow each step of the instruction carefully If ...


56

DANGER!!! This sounds like a ground fault. They are particularly dangerous if you get wet, which is why Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters have been required for many years in kitchens and bathrooms, among other places. If you have shoes on, you are insulated from the floor. Without shoes, a little bit of electricity makes its way from the fan through you to ...


52

It's dangerous. You've spotted one important flaw but it can combine with others to make a really dangerous product. I originally suspected it was made in Europe by someone with more interest/knowledge in the sculptural aspect than the electrical one, but I've since spotted contact details in China for the seller. Either way it shouldn't be sold. Here's why ...


44

That plug needs redoing. Urgently. It is unsafe. Make sure the clamp is on the covering for the cable not the individual wires This is a correctly wired UK plug... different live & neutral colours and there's a fuse, but you get the idea that the cable grip goes over the outer covering of the cable and is properly tightened. The exposed power wires ...


30

The fact that part of the bit has broken off does lead one to believe the rest of it may be in danger of disintegrating during use with the potential for bits of metal to go flying in unexpected directions. Also, the fact that the point appears to be off-center means that you're going to have a hard time getting the bit centered where you want the hole to be ...


27

I'm not certain what guage that wire is but many manufacturers will cite a minimum bend radius. It may or may not be code compliance wherever you are in the world. I suspect that wire has a minimum bend radius between 1 and 2 inches. You can achieve that most easily by just rotating the receptacle. The wire will tail upwards, which will look strange, but it ...


26

The safety solution is to either add a grounding using a grounded cord with the ground branching off and attaching to the metal as close to where it enters as possible. Or you can convert the lamp to low voltage LED with the 220 to 5 or 12V conversion external to it so safety ground isn't a requirement.


23

Hitting buried pipes and cables: gas, water, sewer, electric power, communications (telephone, TV, fiber), and oil. For oil and gas lines, third party damage (eg. backhoe) is the second most common cause of leaks after pinhole corrosion leaks. Transmission lines are rare in a subdivision but there are some old ones. Also, watch out above for power lines as ...


23

Edit: This question is far too broad to be practically answered in detail. If you were asking about specific dangers, that would be appropriate for this forum in my read of the question requirements, but you are asking something that invites opinion and cannot reasonably be responded to comprehensively because you haven't given us any details about the ...


21

Blacksmith37 has a great answer. I would add as I could run a blooper reel with things I have seen from excavators and bobcats... Just one piece of advice. Do not dig outside a large hole. For instance if you are doing a pool, dig from within and build yourself a nice ramp at a gentle angle out. It is easy to get 6-8 feet down and everything is fun and ...


20

I know you're looking for a "tweet" of an answer, a simplistic reason "Oh, it's this". There's actually a lot to it. It's not an ideology, it's hard empirical data culled from a sea of accident reports. They are using field data to "min-max" for minimum casualties. What you're talking about is an isolated system. That is a ...


19

You should trim the extra copper off it will not help to have it hanging out there. You also need to make sure when you put things back together the clamp is on the covering for the cable not the individual wires but other than those items I would say it looks safe. A proper torque would be needed to be 100%.


18

Looks more like mildew, which is related to mold, but not as dangerous (from a health standpoint). Yes, a dehumidifier could help prevent mildew. I would also look for sources of the moisture, e.g. a clothes dryer that is not venting to the outside, a bathroom vent that is not functioning (or non-existent), water leaking somewhere etc.


17

Your pull chain switch is probably starting to fail. The switch and chain wouldn't be grounded because it in a plastic housing so if the switch contacts are leaking over to the chain, that's where your shock is probably coming from.


16

I think mark f has already answered your question well. I just wanted to add some photos from a similar project I did last year in case these are helpful to you. I installed a weatherproof cover and box to replace the old ones that supplied my above-ground pool. Fair warning: don't do this at your own pool because my installation was deficient in several ...


16

While they are 100% sure what type and size of fastener is required for assembling the product, they have no control over the type of wall/support you are installing/fastening the product to (concrete, masonry, wood..etc). It may have recommendation in the instruction sheet, with the type and size indicated for varies types of support medium, and indicating ...


15

Taking down the wall safely is not the only issue. You wrote in comments: there's no legal problem here because we own all the land surrounding the house that isn't ours, and the connection between the house and the old wall is actually on our property and not technically legal. My perspective is that of a retired US lawyer, wholly unfamiliar with French ...


14

It's really no less safe than it was to begin with. Carbide bit teeth can release from spin one and fly around. In my professional experience we used such bits until the carbide was completely gone. Masonry bits don't drill, per se. They disintegrate material through impact, like tiny jackhammers. There's always the chance that debris will be ejected. The ...


13

The UPS battery won't be backfeeding into the house service. DC current won't be flowing back through the rectifier diode. I'd be more concerned about doing something wrong with your switch replacements, turning on the power and frying your UPS board. We see this happening all the time here. Play it save and unplug the UPS and anything else on the circuit ...


13

DANGER, WILL ROBINSON The glass doesn't stop the microwaves. The mesh does. However, without that glass in place, the chance of something else going wrong - e.g., that foil coming off or some other part coming loose, is drastically increased. As far as replacing with plastic, I definitely don't recommend it. I'm not against plastic for certain repairs - e.g.,...


12

I would say you need a track drive excavator that has a bucket with a grabbing thumb. You would use the excavator to grab and place the "debris from the old roof and 4th wall that have fallen" so that the excavator can have a stable place to operate from. The excavator's bucket/thumb can then be used to systematically dismantle the wall. For a ...


11

While this should be acceptable, I have personally found a UPS which backfed 240AV out its input pins. I only found this out when brushing against the exposed pins on the wall plug - That UPS went straight in the junk pile! In short, when dealing with mains power, make no assumptions. Use a non-contact voltage indicator or a plug-in lamp or even a ...


11

I would suggest an update to a extra duty double gang cover. Extra duty or “in use” covers are made to be used while something is plugged in. Taymac mx6200 is a cover that has 55 configurations made by Hubbell this will replace your existing cover and it has switch plates and receptacle plates that snap in so your configuration is what you need. This is a ...


11

Something touched on by the other posts is tipping. If you'll note, the excavator you intend to rent has treads that are no wider than the cab. There's two reasons for this Weight. You want this thing to be light enough to fit on a double-axle trailer and be towed by a decently powered truck or van. This is weekend-warrior stuff and a lot of rental places ...


10

Looks good - you're not switching the neutral, the loads are all in parallel, and the conductors are kept together.


8

No, that is not safe. The 23W CFL limit means that you should not use a bulb that uses more than 23W of power. A 30/50/150W 3-way will use more than that on its lowest setting. If you don't want to use a CFL, and I don't blame you, please consider an LED bulb. These generate even less heat than a CFL. Use the ACTUAL power rating, which is likely to be in ...


8

From the link you posted: The dimmer is rated for up to 210W of halogens with or without transformer. So if you have 6x 20W 12V halogen bulbs, total 120W, it's okay. You should check the power on the bulbs to make sure they're not 50W halogen bulbs, in which case it would exceed the rated power of the dimmer, although 12V 50W are pretty rare. When your ...


8

Bits break all the time even in the best conditions. There's nothing particularly unsafe about breaking a bit unless you happen to be sticking your head+eye right next to the drill for some strange reason. The bit does look like it's on its last legs however. I'd be surprised if it still even works. You could easily break off the carbide center part, and ...


8

It's only going to be half as effective as it was, with one half missing. Using damaged tools is hardly sensible - they don't work as well as good ones. Probably not so much dangerous as inefficient. To prove/disprove this, buy another, and drill the next two holes, one with each, consecutively. Somehow, I guess the old one will be pretty lame in comparison.


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