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6

A metal bucket is much MORE prone to be attacked by acids in general than most plastics, especially those commonly used for buckets. As it's "waste acid" throw in a box or two of baking soda and you'll neutralize it right then and there. Preferably outside due to the release of carbon dioxide. Or use marble/limestone chips or dust.


4

This sounds like an issue from a physical damage standpoint While the NM cable only needs to be protected by guard strips if it's within 6' of a scuttle hole in your case, as per NEC 320.23(A) (referred to by NEC 334.23): (A) Cables Run Across the Top of Floor Joists. Where run across the top of floor joists, or within 2.1 m (7 ft) of the floor or ...


2

This is a very simple task as long as you are legally allowed to disconnect the stove (many places allow you to install your own appliances). I think that people are unreasonably afraid of "working on gas", but you're not actually working on something - you're turning off a valve. So, turn off the valve that leads to the kitchen, then turn off the valve ...


2

Considering the fact that you've never worked with gas lines, contact the gas company. They will probably come out and disconnect it for you and then check for leaks from your valves.


2

Easiest way to protect them is to fasten a board to the floor/joists on either side. I would paint the boards a contrasting colour so they are highly visible. Slightly harder, but probably even safer would be to split 1.5" waste pipe in half lay it over the pipe, and secure it with pipe hanger tape (metal pipe with a hole per inch)on either side.


2

Do not use metal! That goes for any acid. Generally its pretty easy to find good resources on plastic manufacturers websites. Try here. (muriatic acid = Hydrochloric acid) https://www.plasticsintl.com/chemical-resistance-chart This chart gives data for 0.4M and 4M. If this is waste acid, you are probably more in the range of 0.4 but you might as well ...


1

In parts -- The smell from any paint or varnish is a result of outgassing. Leave the doors open and that should disappear in a week or less. If it doesn't, or the paint remains "tacky" then strip and redo with fresh paint. Unless you are storing foodstuffs unbagged, there's no direct contact between food and the drawers, so it's a nonissue. If you are ...


1

I don't see any cause for concern with your intended use of the area. However, things don't always work out like we plan. Therefore, a double-the-capacity Bath Exhaust Fan, Exterior Wall Fan or even a kitchen Range-hood (to be down much closer to your work...can be mounted to slide up and down) would be ideal. Such an exhaust can be switched on and off ...


1

Plastic vessel. Add a base, easiest is barn lime (white is better), garden lime. Both have fine particles. Dilute your liquid with water, at least to 2/3 of the vessel. SLOWLY add lime. This process releases CO CO2? and H use good ventilation! Add a bit more lime after percolation stops. Now you have Lime water. Add to your garden!


1

Technically I don't believe these violate the codes as they are written but they do seem to in spirit. If any of these are bothering you, it is up to you to make them safer. Add runways or shields to protect them or case them with split pipes - anything to get them out of harms way and keep you from tangling with them. The codes are meant to provide ...


1

Step 1. Call the gas co. service to do it for you. Step 2. Sleep well knowing you won't die in your sleep or blow your house to kingdom come. This just is not something you want to take any chances with just to save $50. Jack is right.


1

Climbing the ladder hoping for the best is always a bad idea in my opinion. My husband works for a professional company that offer fall protection systems. He always says when you have to climb more than 18 feet, you got to have protection on you. Any string attached is better than no strings! I'll share some of this suggestions here: Always use a climbing ...


1

If you follow the (3) wires from gas valve, two end up on the control board and one goes to a limit switch on the blower. This limit switch was burnt out on my furnace. It's a relatively inexpensive part to replace. Good luck.


1

The issue is loading Generally when you see a 2-pole 240V breaker dedicated to an appliance, the appliance is intentionally sized to use the entire circuit. Take a water heater. Its rating is 23A. Code requires a 125% derate, which puts it at 28.75 amps, just enough to shimmy under the "30 amp" figure. In other words, the appliance uses all of the ...


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