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30

The fact that part of the bit has broken off does lead one to believe the rest of it may be in danger of disintegrating during use with the potential for bits of metal to go flying in unexpected directions. Also, the fact that the point appears to be off-center means that you're going to have a hard time getting the bit centered where you want the hole to be ...


14

It's really no less safe than it was to begin with. Carbide bit teeth can release from spin one and fly around. In my professional experience we used such bits until the carbide was completely gone. Masonry bits don't drill, per se. They disintegrate material through impact, like tiny jackhammers. There's always the chance that debris will be ejected. The ...


8

From the link you posted: The dimmer is rated for up to 210W of halogens with or without transformer. So if you have 6x 20W 12V halogen bulbs, total 120W, it's okay. You should check the power on the bulbs to make sure they're not 50W halogen bulbs, in which case it would exceed the rated power of the dimmer, although 12V 50W are pretty rare. When your ...


8

It's only going to be half as effective as it was, with one half missing. Using damaged tools is hardly sensible - they don't work as well as good ones. Probably not so much dangerous as inefficient. To prove/disprove this, buy another, and drill the next two holes, one with each, consecutively. Somehow, I guess the old one will be pretty lame in comparison.


8

Bits break all the time even in the best conditions. There's nothing particularly unsafe about breaking a bit unless you happen to be sticking your head+eye right next to the drill for some strange reason. The bit does look like it's on its last legs however. I'd be surprised if it still even works. You could easily break off the carbide center part, and ...


5

It's not a matter of safety, but of being able to still drill holes with it. Normaly, a drill bit is (mostly) symmetric at the tip - it has a small number of "flutes" (the indentations at the sides, which allow material to exit the hole that is being drilled), and they converge to however many small edges or "blades" at the tip. During ...


3

Non contact voltage detectors are very sensitive and can be miss-leading. They detect the presence of power, not the amount of flow of power. Your smart dimmer is using a tiny bit of power at all times which is being routed thru the neutral, which is appropriate, but it's enough to trigger a non-contact voltage detector. If you really are worried about it, ...


3

I normally use use an ordinary hand truck with inflatable tyres, if your stair climber can stop on any step to allow you to rest you are probably good to go. Make sure the stairs are clean, and wear grippy shoes. Keep the load balanced over the axle and lift with your knees. Go one step at a time. Remember to breathe. I would be inclined to let my children ...


3

Well all your prep work sounds good but I am well over 100Kg and I would want another person on the stairs below to help by actually pushing back on the freezer so it doesn’t drag you down the stairs. The model I use has belts that when you pull it back the belts ride on the stair edge and don’t tear up the stairs. But even with this I consider it a 2 person ...


3

Depends how important the hole is. This drill is likely to oversize the hole, and make it not-round. But that may be acceptable in your situation. If you're drilling though something, the exit hole is likely to be more ragged. If you're doing a blind hole, or if the other side is okay with spalling and breakout then again, up to you. The drill might fail ...


3

I would replace that masonry bit with a new one. If you are drilling a large hole in solid masonry it would be wise to drill a hole with a smaller bit first, similar to drilling in steel, and then finish the hole with the larger bit. Also, if the bit does not drill into the concrete with normal pressure, do not overpower the bit with extreme force. That will ...


2

You need to have your new home inspected for excess dust, mold, CO, CO2 and any other pathogens. Most of these items would have been found with a good home inspection. Also, the heating system, exhaust vents, chimneys, any air filters, water lines and sewers need to be inspected. Areas of excess humidity and wet spots need to be addressed. There may be other ...


2

Those joists carry dead/live loads of the closet floor, any walls resting on it and that transfer loads, foot of any attic stairs etc.. There is also a load transferring from the studs you mention via a bottom plate (not visible) onto the joists. If you remove the joists during work, you have to support the flooring and bottom plate that rests on the joists. ...


2

There are combined CO/NG detectors, very cheap. The best NG detector is your nose. Your air filter will not filter either of these gases, they will pass through. If you have an electrostatic air filter it might set NG aflame .... that would certainly alert you to it. The stuff in your air filter could be grey, black, brown, white ... it really depends ...


2

The likelihood is that the tip will break off in the hole and you won't be able to retrieve it. This will make it impossible to drill further and probably damage any new bit you try. There is a good possibility that the untipped drill will melt and weld itself to the inside of the hole together with the broken tungsten. If the location of the hole is not ...


2

Safe? Meh, you probably won't get hurt unless the bit snaps in half unexpectedly and your forehead introduces itself to the material you're drilling. Effective, probably not. You will notice much slower progress with new holes, uncentered holes, and even holes that are larger than expected due to travel/wobble. You will very likely overheat the bit very soon ...


2

COVID-19 is not Ebola This is exactly the kind of thing that people have been doing for a long time using friends/relatives. You need at least one person below, preferably two for amateurs (two people, one above, one below, is all that the professionals need for a job like this). Yes, COVID-19 is a problem. But there is a reason that in most areas things ...


2

There are men who can look at the situation and find all the binding points and hazards immediately. You need to focus on this and check all clearances and remove any tripping hazards, etc first. Likewise, a good team of movers intuitively knows the movements necessary to handle something like this, but you'll need to rehearse this with your team. If doing ...


2

A few answers: Bad: Practice first with rocks. Get to know how your stair truck behaves. If you can't take the weight with rocks, they will fall, you won't destroy your new freezer, you will only scratch up your staircase. If you feel comfortable you can try it with the freezer. Bad: Don't use the hand truck. Lie the freezer on its side, tie ratchet ...


1

One thing I don't see on your list is an air purifier. Specifically, one with an activated carbon filter. Those are specifically meant to remove VOCs.


1

Since you've tried all the practical solutions with no success, I'm going to recommend a not so practical one but since it's a closet, it might work. Get a heavy duty plastic drop cloth and cover the entire closet floor. Tuck the edges into the baseboard or seal the edges with painters tape.


1

One of the differences between masonry drills and many other types of drills, is the construction. Mostly when it says "masonry", it's a piece of metal with a couple of pieces of carbide brazed to the end. The carbide is incredibly hard (slightly below diamond), but be clear that it's this piece which does the drilling, not the "pole" ...


1

Speaker wire works well for this, and you can get in-wall rated speaker wire, which usually has a 2nd common insulation around both insulated wires (like cat5). You can of course use regular mains-rated wiring in wall, but it's hard to tuck into tight spaces where you might want to hide an LED strip, and connecting to it legally takes a lot of space. Buy ...


1

Natural gas has a chemical called Mercaptan the human nose can detect this at ~1 part per billion so probably not that. Excess carbon dioxide the stuff you exhale can cause your symptoms and newer tightly sealed homes can allow the carbon dioxide to build up. You may have make up air on your furnace a small amount drawn in from outside. Because of dirty air ...


1

This is an old question, but this is also why I own an axe. I know I probably wouldn't get through that in one go but 10-15 mins times 4-5 times (can't be getting blisters) and that thing is on the ground. I would cut it about a foot to the left of the limb. And I would chop from both sides in a V pattern. Get about 2/3 of the way through it and it ...


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