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30

Looking at the condition of the nut and the minimal profile of the head, I'm afraid the better question may be "how do I get these out with minimal damage to the wood?" I'd take a drill to the end with the nut. Hold the nut with pliers if the nut-and-screw assembly is prone to spinning. Choose a drill slightly larger than the screw itself. You can ...


20

Looks like minor leaks, compounded by mixing galvanized pipe and copper/bronze valve without using dielectric couplings between dissimilar metals. Honestly, any plumber installing NEW galvanized pipes (rather than just making repairs to existing) in the past 5 years is doubtful. If you really want threaded pipe, stainless is available and lead-free, which ...


18

People use the wrong screws outside quite a lot, but thankfully there are good alternatives. Outdoor decking and fencing are commonly assembled with coated screws advertised for such. They typically come in tan or green depending on the application and can hold up for a long time without rust or staining the wood. Stainless steel screws are another option ...


18

I would use a small grinder ( Dremel) with a cut-off wheel and cut the nuts off.


11

Normal flathead screwdriver in theory I believe these are simply used to make it easier to apply a flathead screwdriver with at most 90 degrees of turn adjustment needed. So in theory you can just put a flathead on it, a spanner on the square nut, and you're done. In reality, better with a Dremel on the nut Considering the level of rusting though, it's ...


10

Stainless steel deck screws will not rust. I've used them many times on all types of lumber with great results. But screwing into end grain never works well, put a piece of 2x4 into each corner and screw into the sides of it. The joint will be much stronger.


9

100% galvanic corrosion, "Pipes in the house are a mix of copper, galvanized, and pex", different metals cause corrosion. You should stick to one type of metal in your pipes or use pex. **Note that galvanized means iron/metal with sacrificial coating usually zinc in this case. See https://galvanizeit.org/hot-dip-galvanizing/how-long-does-hdg-last/...


5

Copper oxides = Green "rust" Water causes that, can be aggravated by failure to clean acid flux from soldered fittings, but since yours starts right up by the threads I'd guess you have some "weeping" out the valve and the threads are none too watertight (sloppy workmanship - "just a drain, no need for it to hold water, never going ...


5

Yes, you have small leaks causing rust. See how the rust practically flows like water in this picture? Overall, galvanized pipe should be avoided nowadays as there are much better options such as pex. Ever seen the inside of an in-use galvanized pipe? It looks exactly like what your seeing on the outside. I would not try tightening it further as you will ...


4

That horse has already left the barn. You striped off the protective rubberized coating and exposed the cable underneath which is not galvanized and the rust has already started to eat the cable. Had you left the coating on it would have lasted much longer, at least until UV light cracked and compromised the coating and exposed the cable to the elements. ...


4

What has worked for me in the past is grinding the heads off with a Dremel tool and cutoff wheel or any other type of portable grinder.A hack saw might do the trick too. Then pry the posts away from the wall and then grasp the remaining portion of the screw with a pair of vise grips and turning it counterclockwise. Good luck.


4

Neither should cause any problem if the solution is dried off after.


4

The galvanized pipe is what is corroding and rusting. As noted,there may be other factors at play here like leaky connections but the galvanized pipe is definitely a problem. You should re-plumb with cooper pipe, or pex, and make sure to use a Dielectric Nipple on the inlet and outlet of the water heater.


3

When I had the same problem, I took a 4 1/2 inch angle grinder to the bolt heads. Just be careful and try not to touch the grinder to the porcelain. Also dont grind so long that you heat up the bolts to much and be careful not to melt any plastic bits in the toilet with the grinder spray. When you are done grinding, make sure you clean out all the slag and ...


3

The rust on the stainless eye came from the steel rope. The zinc galvanizing on the wire rope has corroded away leaving bare steel to rust. Using a stainless wire rope will greatly improve the corrosion resistance of the combination and you should have no problem. The eye is probably 316 SS ( 18 -8 + 2% Mo) as are many small consumer fasteners. In a mild ...


3

The screw eyes are not rusting. That's staining from the steel rope which i doubt is galvanized. The rust stains will come off with a little emery paper rub.


3

Honestly, I don't think you can. The problem is railings such as this rust from the inside out. The outside gets primed and painted while the inside never gets any kind of treatment. Aside from using solid "tubing", which is unrealistic, the only other thing I can think of is to "try" to treat the inside of the tubing in areas where water can seep up in to ...


3

No.It will continue rusting and the volume of the corrosion products will crack the concrete. New unrusted rebar will rust ( in concrete) but at a lower rate than your "prerusted" sample. Best practice is to epoxy ( or otherwise coat ) new construction. Stainless rebar is occasionally used. Bridges are a very severe service for rebar corrosion ; rebar in ...


3

Perfectly normal for non-stainless steel pumps to rust. Even stainless steel ones may rust, slightly. The white corrosion may indicate some cast aluminum components, and if so, the combination of aluminum and iron components would also tend to promote galvanic corrosion. It's not a cause for great concern - it's primarily cosmetic. It does lead me personally ...


3

Tapcons and similar are available in stainless: https://www.tapcon.com/products/concrete-screw-anchors/410-stainless-steel-tapcon


2

I don't know that there's much you can do to protect it. The condenser's job is to exhaust the heat from inside your home so you can't really enclose it. Having looked around some, the only thing I've seen that's of a DIY nature is to rinse your condenser on a regular basis. Maybe rig up a sprinkler with a hose and let it spray the condenser. That should ...


2

The usual tool to use for this is a screw extractor. You drill a hole in the screw, then use the screw extractor bit in the hole you drilled. The brand pictured has the drill and extractor on the same bit. Drilling the hole is usually the hard part. It may help to drill the smallest possible hole first, then re-drill with a bigger bit, then extract ...


2

I would spray them with a cold process galvanizing or Zinc-rich spray paint. This will prevent the rusting and can be done in place, use a wire brush to clean the rust off shake the can 2x of the instructions and recoat the area. I use this method after welding galvanized parts together because I grind the galvanized coating off to allow a clean weld and ...


2

There are no magic tricks but I do have a couple of suggestions: Make sure the steel is hotdip galvanized to a coating thickness of 100µm zinc or greater. You can use paint as well but compared to a proper galvanization a regular paint is more decorative than protective. Ensure there is no electrical contact between railing and the rebars in the concrete. ...


2

The problem is that you have a metal to metal connection between the stainless eyes and galvanized wire rope. Add water and you get galvanic corrosion. Either electrically insulate the connection or change the eyes to galvanized ones. The purpose of the plastic coating is mainly to give the cable a cleaner/smoother/softer surface. The galvanizing is to ...


2

Short answer is that it's probably fine. Just set it, patch, texture and paint. More nuanced answer depends on where in the house it's in. If it's a bathroom or other high humidity zone, don't worry about it. (Generally, sheetrock is screwed these days, but it's common enough practice to tack sheets in place with a few nails. Nails aren't particularly rust-...


2

Use a Dremel with a cut off grinder wheel. Works fast and precise. Buy new screws. No holding of screws required. There are thousands other purposes for the Dremel tool you will discover. And it's fun.


2

In addition to the previous two answers, I recommend against galvanized hardware in pressure treated wood unless the packaging specifically indicates that they are suitable for that use. Afaik only hot dipped galvanized is suitable for use with PT, nails are often electrogalvanized.


2

It's called a wingnut. I see the rust on the bolt heads in the tank. Are they also rusted under the wingnuts? Those wingnuts should be replaceable at your local home center. Have you checked? If so, try some WD40 or other penetrating oil under the wingnut and let it sit for a few minutes and then try turning them with large pliers or vise grips putting equal ...


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