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70

What about trimming the roller shade? Most shades are meant to be trimmed, since manufacturers can't make every single size. See if you can pop off one of the ends, and then cut the rolled-up shade with a utility knife or something similar.


22

Trimming the roller shade is obviously the right answer, but just in case somebody has a similar problem where it isn't the right answer: Don't try and create a router cut 3½" deep and ¼" wide - create one 3½" wide and ¼" deep. No router will have a problem with that. Probably easiest to clamp a piece of scrap to the outside of the beam, and then just cut ...


15

A typical spindle sander rotates at between 100 and 2,000 RPM, where a router is much faster 8,000 to 35,000 RPM. So I would say this is probably not the best idea, and could lead to damage to the equipment, injury, and death.


14

I'd make a template in the shape of a square donut out of 1/2" plywood by using a table saw to cut out the square hole in the 1/2" plywood. For example, if ... i) the recess in the desktop needs to be 8"x12" ii) the diameter of the base of the router is 6" iii) the diameter of the router bit is 1/2" ... then I'd ... 1) start with a rectangular piece ...


9

The most likely solution is to create a template and use a router with a bit that follows the template. The router would also be used for easing over any sharp edges. photo credit, sample image, not a product recommendation


9

They are not standard, but there seem to be a few common patterns. Rockler's website has a guide for choosing a mounting plate for your router. These are the router models that they support: Group A routers: Makita 1100; Milwaukee 5615-5624; DeWalt 616-618; Bosch 1617-1618; Ridgid 2930 Combo Kit; Hitachi M12VC (fixed and kit); Porter-Cable 690, 890, ...


8

More routers is always better! But here are things that I would look for when buying a single general-purpose router: Adjustable speed. Large bits have a larger diameter and thus higher linear speed at the cutting edge, so you want to use a slower RPM to compensate. An adjustable-speed router will be useful in a wider range of applications. Multiple base ...


8

Router bits have to be carefully checked against the type of cut being created. For the general cut there is a correct feed direction and there is an incorrect direction. For some bits used in a certain way there is no ideal cut direction. The general principal is that the work piece should be fed into the router bit so that the incoming wood is pushing ...


7

I highly recommend using a pusher and gloves for this project. There are lots of "brands" you can choose from, or you can use another board to do it. You only have one set of fingers though, and keeping them safe is more important than any project. If you will note in the above picture, the board is being pushed forward and into the fence. This is an ...


7

It's entirely possible, and often reasonable. Without going as far as buying a CNC router (handy, but expensive) simple jigs and sleds permit cutting precisely circular holes (eat your heart out, jigsaws) and precisely straight edges (like a tablesaw with no need to use a jointer afterwards - indeed, many people with tablesaws use a router jig to joint ...


6

You could use a router set in a router table, with a crosscut sled set at 45 degrees. Building a jig with a "pin" that fits into the previously cut groove, will make sure all the grooves are cut an equal distance apart. The "pin" will be attached to the sled in some way, and will sit against the edge of the work piece for the first cut. After the first ...


6

A laminate trimmer is pretty specialized and not a good choice for deeper wood working. A decent lockable plunge router can handle all the tasks you listed. I would invest in a good quality larger router as my first, more versatile tool.


6

First, setup a lamp shinning on the rounded edge. Get two rulers, place one perpendicular the vertical side of the stair and the other perpendicular the horizontal side. Then line rulers up flush to each other, say at the 4” mark, you should be able to get a measurement of where the gap starts (from both directions). That’s the radius! The idea is you ...


6

You are quite lucky that you were not injured. Perhaps you should take a step back and plan it out a little better. Proper shop safety should always be followed, even on small jobs. For starters, the piece of stock you were trying to machine is far too short to be cut with a router safely. The minimum length that can be cut with a router is around 12". For ...


6

It can be done, but to use a router to cut wood is not optimum. Jigging a router can be more complex and a router will usually cut out a much wider swath and create way more sawdust and wood chips. The router will also cut much slower in thicker materials and has big learning curve issues regarding proper direction of cut. When you start considering a ...


5

I would use a wood patch called a dutchman. If your router has a plunge feature, make a small template to aid in cutting in a dutchman. The article the link refers to does it differently than I do, since it cuts out the damage and the repair piece with the router using one template and two different guides. Where I use one guide only to cut the bad spot out,...


5

Adding a full round-over edge (bullnose) to plywood of the type that you have pictured is questionable in my mind. Typically such edging is applied to solid wood pieces. The plywood may very well have tearout along the edges where the grain is at odd angles. This can be somewhat mitigated by using the very best router bits that are extremely sharp. You ...


5

Why are you using a router? Does your microwave overlap the edges? If so, I'd use a jigsaw, seems to me to be much easier set up.


5

Of course you can use a router to cut through wood! It's done all the time. But, using a router to cut through wood is typically reserved to a CNC router. For humans, a jigsaw would be easier to control.


5

Likely a false economy. You might spend $200 or more on tools for the job...router bits are not cheap, and neither is a good router (though the cost of bits soon exceeds the cost of the router, be it good or cheap.) My ballpark guess on "how that was done" (or could, most inexpensively, be done) is 5 saw cuts on a tablesaw and then cutting 3 edges with a ...


5

The easiest thing would be to rip it on a table saw with the angle and depth set correctly.


4

Just gas bubbles in the fillet brazing that joins the carbide to the shank. You can see the brass color of the brazing in the flute. The carbide is socketed into the shank and the braze weld in that area is the true strength element. In brazed joints, the fillet is more cosmetic blending to reduce a stress riser than additional strength, the important part ...


4

It's not sane. All you need is a utility knife. Even a curve cut is really easy with a sharp knife. But if it makes you feel good then go for whatever saw you want. I do a lot of things that are a little more fun but not always the best choice.


4

There are a brazillion router bit roundover sizes. From somewhere with a gentle return policy, buy the one you think you need plus sizes above and below. Or if you're going to a brick+mortar, you could create a profile template (stiff cardboard) of your stair and compare it with what's on the shelf.


4

You could get a better measurement with a profile tool.


4

Yes, this is a plunge router. Note in particular the second photo,which shows the adjustable depth stop rod and the turret beneath it which allows progressively stepping the bit deeper in successive passes until it reaches the intended depth. The fact that the base is attached via two smooth rods that guide the plunge also makes this fairly obvious.


4

Straightly has entirely to do with your fence/guide, and there are many ways to do that. You can fence the baseplate, use collars and fence those, or use bearing bits and fence those - it's just a matter of offset from the cut line. Cleanly is trickier, and depends on where you need clean. Solid wood trim would allow you to cover your sins, while trying to ...


4

Routers are very handy tools and can be used for some amazing things but can also be very dangerous if not operated in a manner where you can easily maintain 100% total control over the tool at all times. While it may be technically feasible to operate a router on a vertical surface I would be tempted to recommend against it in this case. The reason is ...


3

You should have mounting holes in the back of the router. Simply just attach something like a command strip to the wall and hang the router. We use these for the exact purpose in our personal offices at work.


3

A multitool was exactly what was needed. Thanks to @bib for the suggestion. Ended up getting this Bosch multitool as it had both the half circle and straight blade. I cut though the floorboards with the tool - it took a little longer than expected but it worked perfectly. Ended up with quite a deep groove and had loads of space for the cables so managed ...


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