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14

I will tackle this from three ways. I work as a general contractor when doing flips. I would hope to remember to put up plastic or block off areas. First because I do not want things in other areas to get damaged and secondly because I can allocate someone I am paying $15 an hour to do this. If I didn't think ahead... I don't have 1 plumber out of the 5-...


6

The reason for a rough opening is so that it CAN be rough in dimensions. Your opening should be no problem. Rough openings are made larger to accommodate headers and floors than out of level, adjacent studs that may be out of plumb, framing lumber that has thickness variations, openings that are slightly out of square and maybe some other things I've not ...


5

Just leave a tail hanging at the location of the first light can. Tape the cleanly-cut end (in case someone does something stupid at the panel) and let the inspector know what's up. Everything after that can be addressed at final inspection. The same situation (and solution) applies for bathroom vanities and other fixture-only (no box) lighting.


5

Do not cover over the following items: Integral Stops (Item 9 on page 2 of the instructions, there are two) These are the isolation valves for the hot and cold connections to the valve. These valves allow you turn off the water to the shower valve to do repair/maintenance without having to turn off the water to the whole house. Balancing Spool (Item 8 on ...


5

You can do a number of things here: Shorten the stud board coming down to the header and move the header up 1.5” to 2” inches (I would do that ) - a nice oscillating cutting tool would make that easy to do right in place. I would then install my cabinet - and I would have a sturdy upper frame for it as well. You could remove it , replace it with something ...


4

Would I expect a plumber to do it? No. Would some plumbers do it? Probably. If there's a general contractor, I'd have expected them to delegate the task. You should definitely discuss this with them, and try to work out a solution. If there's not a general contractor, site preparation would be your responsibility. If this is the case, I might have ...


4

I've learned over the years that when starting any job communication is the key factor. If I sense the home owner is not asking pertinent question I will briefly lay out the work for the day. Regarding the plumbers stating it wasn't their responsibility to set-up dust containment, well don't feel every plumber is this indifferent. Either way they should have ...


4

Yes. There is no code preventing this. Also this makes sense because all of your leak issues are in the same place. One other bit of advice - before you close up the wall get rid of the the metal and cast iron venting/drains. It will cost you $20 and the pvc will have less problems and last longer (and won't be flagged on future home inspection). [...


4

That's for a shower drain. It's common to leave an opening about that size to allow for slight variation in tub position, manipulation of the trap assembly, etc. You should find a stub under the dirt. Normally you'd remove the lumber, which was a temporary concrete form.


4

The general guidelines: Don't notch a joist. (it's legal under the correct circumstances, but don't consider it until you have no other choice.) Don't drill a joist near the ends. (how near is near? Stick to the middle third and be safe. ) Only drill on the center-line of the joist. (This is the area under least stress). keep your holes less than 1/3 the ...


4

Every shower body comes with part #4 on page two - "Plaster Ground". This is what you tile up to. This is the hole you cut your Sheetrock/cement board to fit around. The trim piece for the body will cover this hole.


4

You want to follow the instructions given to cut the upper short stud some and then move the header up the requisite amount. Make sure to re-nail the lower end of the short stud to the raised header. Please ignore the noise here regarding removing the header entirely. You do not want to do that since that upper short stud lower end would be unsecured and ...


3

The box must be large enough for the wire fill and device by code since you are installing a 20 amp circuit it should be #12 wire. #12 wire has a volume of 2.25 per conductor and 4.5 for the device so if you use a shallow box and only run the 3 wires into it the box volume would need to be 11.25 sq inch (listed value not measured) if there is enough room to ...


3

Closet to the corner against wall is for a shower or bath drain. The next is toilet drain. The next is where you attach the sink drain. The fourth (closest to camera) is the main stack for the house, with the main line clean out at the bottom.


3

Generally for interior doors the RO (Rough Opening) is 2 inches wider than the door slab. This gives 3/4" for the jamb and 1/4" of 'play' for each side, for you to adjust the jamb to make the door operate properly. So if you've got 29 13/16 instead of 30, you'll end up with a little over 1/4 of play total instead of 1/2. Still should be plenty if your jacks ...


3

Plumbing in concrete slabs pretty much requires ripping the floor open to make any changes to it. I suppose if you chose a new toilet with a LARGE base and were very careful you MIGHT be able to keep all the floor damage under it, but that's making assumptions that you'll be able to rework cast iron pipes (not the most cooperative things) through a fairly ...


3

I might quibble about floor thickness (3/4 for wood strip flooring), jamb thickness (closer to 5/8) and you're missing a gap between jamb and header (1/2 to 3/4), so I would add 1/4 +1/4 +1/2 to 3/4 for a 2 1/2 to 2 3/4 RO


3

I ended up contacting the plumbing company that did the rough in. They said: 1-Drain and vent for basement sink 2-Toilet rough-in 3-Backwater Valve 4-Tub Drain


3

Based on the flexibility of the flat bar stock, I decided to use square 1/2" tube stock. Using a 3/4" MDF subtop, I routed channels 5/8" wide and 9/16" deep. I then filled these channels with polyurethane glue, set in the steel bars, and finally I used a drywall knife to spread and flatten glue over the top of the bars. Here are pictures of my actual work:...


3

What size battery do you have? When using large bits the drill draws a high amperage the smaller batteries just cannot sustain a heavy load. For example a 1 amp hour drill may be able to drill an inch but jump to a 4 amp hour or larger and it may not over heat and shutdown at all, I found this especially true with my battery band saw, trying to cut 2" pipe ...


2

How much of an overhand do you plan on having? The spec I saw was that 10 inches were allowed with no supports. When the granite guy came to measure mine he told me I didn't really need them even at 12. I had alread put in corbels which look good, but do get in the way of knees. If I did it again, I would consider going to 10" and not having any bracking. ...


2

I think you don't "have to" break up the concrete. Let's say your shower/tub extends out 30inches. Whether you have to break up concrete around shower pan or for tub depends on what you install. The last few pans I installed in basements met above grade -slightly. Also note that you will have to find a pan/tub that fits those exact dimensions or you will ...


2

According to IRC, for supply system testing. You have to test using the maximum working pressure (80 psi) of water, or 50 psi of air. And you have to maintain the pressure for 15 minutes. For air testing drain-waste-vent (DWV) systems, you have to maintain 5 psi for 15 minutes. Contact your local government, to find out what they require. International ...


2

Just use an old work box. Cut the hole in the wall to fit the box. Slide the box in with the tabs folded down. Turn the screws until the tabs flip out and grab the back of the wallboard.


2

If I had to guess I'd say that the builder expected the wall to pass over that point, and the vanity installed adjacent. You appear to have built your wall tight to the furnace, which isn't ideal for maintenance reasons. I'd bet that if you had set a wall 12" from the center of the 3" pipe it would line up with the 2" pipe. As to why it's under the ...


2

Normally a wall corner like that is framed with a U structure comprising three studs, plus one stud on the adjacent wall, though some variations use just three studs total in the case of interior walls. The idea is that both inside and both outside corner faces have backing for drywall and corner bead. The plumbing passages are then hogged out using ...


1

Can I run the sheathed wire through the top box down to the bottom box and then bring it back up to the top box? Yes.


1

Depending on your local codes, one might use a studer vent at the end of a short vent pipe (higher than any sink bowls/toilet resevoirs in the basement). Such a vent isn't allowed to be within a closed off space (ie. within a wall) ...as there's be no make-up air.


1

You need to use strain reliefs/clamps which are correct (i.e. listed) for the cable you are using. For instance if you have cordage (cable designed to be a flexible appliance power cord), don't use a strain relief intended for NM simply because it's the only thing Home Depot sells. Home improvement shops like Home Depot or Lowes have notoriously bad ...


1

While I totally agree it's the wrong place for the BWV, it's not sticking out of the floor. So, is your problem with doing a finished floor? As far as framing goes, I'd include the sump corner & make that whole end into a closet in the powder room.


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