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3

They are ring-shank nails, so they are hard to pull by design. You need a crow-bar, pry-bar, ripping bar, wrecking bar. Solid steel with the "claw" on a looped end, 2 or 3 feet long. Not a hammer. Apologize to your hammer if you haven't already wrecked it. Preferable to leave the heads on, as it will be faster to rip them out with the bar if you ...


3

Use an end nipper to cut them flush: Brand name on image included deliberately as this is an endorsement because quality products give better performance.


2

I use a nail jack or crescent nail puller. I have demoed many decks and membrane roofs with this tool. It has a beak you place over the head, on nails that are set into the wood it takes a couple hits to get under the head but with washers I can usually grab the head and rock them right out. I have even used My nail jack to pull finishing nails out of hardie ...


2

Well honestly you can't do much with them. I wouldn't take a grinder or anything like that too them as during the cutting process you are surely loosening the nails and you risk them potentially failing or popping on the other side. Even bending these into the board more, that is a risk I wouldn't take as the reward (still doesn't look perfect) outweighs ...


1

It’s difficult to see, but I suspect your gable end wall is not ballooned framed, but rather has a double top plate. This creates a “hinge” in the wall. The diagonal braces keep the end wall from bending like a hinge during a wind storm or seismic activity. (I know, you’re going to tell me the ceiling will keep everything square and plumb. However, ceilings ...


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