Hot answers tagged

30

Bad. Not only are you introducing stink and moisture to your attic, but toxic and potentially explosive gases as well. Decomposing waste materials in public and private sewer and septic systems create sewer gases. Methane is the largest single constituent of sewer gas, which includes an assortment of toxic and non-toxic gases, such as hydrogen sulfide, ...


17

A If you choose B you will dimple the steel, ruining the look while creating a penetration point for water because expansion and contraction of the metal due to heating and cooling will create an open access point for water to enter, and a big opening behind it to receive it. A, however, will give you a tight seal against the wood, wood-steel-screw in a ...


17

I guess you mean a galvanized or otherwise coated steel. Life depends on weather, specifically rain. In a desert it will last forever. If the current coating is repaired at any damage spots, it will last almost forever. "Repair" could be anything from dabbing on roofing tar to sandblasting and coating with a zinc-rich epoxy (typically used to protect ...


14

You should fix this (see isherwood's answer), but you don't necessarily need to extend it back out of the roof again, assuming that you have at least one vent to the outside somewhere else in the system. You could instead cap it with an internal drainage vent (also known as an air admittance valve). This lets air in (necessary for good drainage) without ...


14

As a R.R.C. and roofer for over 25 years, this doesn't surprise me. Anyone with a pickup truck and a ladder calls himself a roofer. This is wrong, if they eliminated vents they should have replaced the sheathing. An opening up to 4"x4" can be covered with metal, but anything bigger requires re-sheathing to eliminate a fall hazard. Also the nail pattern ...


12

I would give your business to one of the "is good and stays dry" roofers who are not blatantly trying to fleece you. Now, the other two may be working from the assumption that if you bothered to call a roofer, you have leaks. But they strike me a lying scammers if they are selling you new plywood with no idea if the roof deck is rotten or solid. Plywood ...


11

I wouldn't worry too much about it. The plywood is not typically supporting a load of more than the paper and asphalt shingles that were placed, even more so if you have a considerable pitch on your roof to where it would be difficult or impossible for a person to walk on. It basically serves so that you have something to nail the shingles down securely. ...


11

That's perfectly normal. I would have preferred to see the vertical joints in the sheathing line up with the rafters, but that's about it. Roofing nails actually should come through about a quarter inch - I'd be more concerned if they didn't.


10

The same policy goes for roof sheathing as for hanging drywall, you get more strength by spanning more rafters/joists/studs and offsetting the joints. This solves two points of weakness. The main one is the structure turning into a parallelogram where the studs are no longer perpendicular to the ground. When you think of using a diagonal brace to support a ...


10

Roofing nails are a bad choice for attaching sheathing. The wire gauge is too small and the hardness of the nail shank is much less than a framing nail. I personally like to use 6d or 8d ring shank nails for OSB. 8d common nails are Ok as well. Ring nails won't loosen or back out over time as wood dries and shrinks. The heads of the roofing nails can easily ...


10

As much as you probably don't want to hear this, I am quite sure you are stuck with the job as it is. The time to decide if the sheathing needed to be replaced or over sheathed was when the roof was stripped clean. My first observation is that you said you had 3/8" plywood. 3/8" would be the absolute minimum size, 1/2" or 5/8" T&G would have been ...


9

You will need to remove the ridge vent so you can shingle up to the cut opening, and under where the ridge vent attaches. If you can salvage it great, but otherwise, install a new ridge vent. Do not try to mickey mouse your last row of shingles under it to avoid taking it off. You WILL be sorry the first time it rains.


9

A galvanized roof that leaks may have leaky nails Tin roofs are typically held down by nails, and over the years the nails loosen and leak. The new approach is to use nails or screws with an elastomeric rubber pad, and set their compression pressure carefully. I am super fond of roof screws of an appropriate size to not overlarge the old nail holes too ...


8

The plywood of your roof is typically not as thick as your standard galvanized steel roofing nail, so it is expected for nails to show through this in your attic. The plywood can and is expected to take a bit of damage over time and this is okay as long as the shingle has something firm to hold itself down onto. Over time if the plywood is too damaged to ...


8

It is not acceptable that the roofing materials were replaced over the plywood cutouts (which actually look more like breakouts). One can surmise that the stripping crew came one day and removed all the old roofing material and did the breakouts. Before calling it a day they rolled out the underlayment (a.k.a tar paper) and covered over the breakouts in ...


7

I used to use a 7 1/4" metal cutting wheel on a circular saw. Works good, but wheel wears down fairly fast. There are also some good shear attachments that mount on drills. I'd advise you to make the cuts on the end going to the top, not the exposed bottom. Definitely have some spray paint or primer to treat the cut end, because it will rust. If you put ...


7

Concrete itself is not waterproof, in fact, it's more like a sponge, so concrete alone is never used to create an impermeable surface. You haven't provided much info - is the roof flat, sloped? What is already up there? There are tons of different waterproofing methods available. Going under the assumption that it was properly waterproofed at some point, ...


7

"What is considered an acceptable angle for a roof to ensure that there will be sufficient run-off during rain conditions?" Generally, minimum slope for water to run off is 1% (1/8" per 1'). However, minimum slope for a flat roof by building code here is 2%. (1/4" per 1'). You have more than enough slope for your roof, however you will likely need some ...


7

You wear a harness attached to a rope that is thrown over the roof and tied to something solid such as a tree. The harness kit may look like this: The harness is most often used in a manner as shown here. A short connecting rope goes from the middle of the high back over to a D-Clip that then attaches to the main safety rope via a Robe Grab. Rope grabs ...


7

This would be a situation where you'll have to use gutter straps (usually in T or K style): Image credit to acehardware.com They install on the roof decking - make sure to follow the manufacturer's instructions, as you'll be penetrating the singles. Image credit to www.heritagehillweb.org


7

WHAT, he eliminated your air vents? Wow, your update is so revealing: 1) sheetmetal is not an acceptable cover over large openings, 2) if sheetmetal was used, it was not nailed to the existing plywood, 3) he eliminated air vents, Sheetmetal is allowed to cover openings in plywood roof sheathing up to 4” x 4” only. Any opening larger needs solid sheathing. (...


6

There's a couple of different tools you can use: The best tool / way 1 - Electric shears and / or nibblers. These are in my opinion, the best tools you can buy. Shears work fine while nibblers are designed more specifically for corrugated or curved panels. If you're a professional, this is what you need to buy. Fein Nibbler link at Amazon Trumpf Tools ...


6

The Uni Knot is a slip knot that is adjustable. The Hangman's Noose is not typically considered adjustable. The Hangman's Noose when the loop is under load is pulling on the top of the knot as well as conventionally on the bottom of the knot which is truly tightening the knot. They are typically only used with thicker ropes because otherwise you run a risk ...


6

Those nails are used only for holding down the roofing underlayment. They excel at doing so whether it be old school tar paper, or the newer more durable, hi tech roof underlayments.


6

It's a mistake for the roofers to say that the plywood will definitely have to be replaced. However, they may be familiar with homes in your area, that were built around the same time. So they may have experience, that tells them that the decking will likely have to be replaced. Sometimes in situations like this, contractors will pad the estimate with the ...


6

To properly answer this question requires proper interpretation of: Published Building Codes (depending on what part of Canada the residence is in. Canadian Building Codes applicable to the specific region where the Re Roofing is taking place. Some are based on NBC (National Building Code of Canada) some regions are based on ICC (International Code Council ...


5

The picture isn't really two different methods, but two different plans. It's one method (soffit at the bottom and ridge at the top). The only difference is what you actually insulate - and it's the same thing. Insulate anything that you want kept at "livable" temperature, since it will be part of the conditioned envelope of the house, keeping in mind ...


5

Either shingling a wall or a roof, there is no magic formula, just practice and experience. I will give you a couple of hints. (trade secrets so don't say I told you!) Since you are working on a roof, this can be a little tricky but doable. First, separate your shingles into piles by size. You can usually make 4 or 5 different piles. Open 3 or more bundles ...


5

Nailing sheets longitudinally greatly increases the length(s), nails, and nail-downs allocated to edge nailing, the most problematic fastening that is required--you have one (eight-foot) line of rafter midline nailing for every two (eight-foot) lines of sheet and rafter edge nailing. With transverse sheathing, the sheet length and nail count allocated to ...


5

Is the water running down the roof not going into the gutter, and instead flowing behind the gutter? If so, then there is a problem with the gutter and/or flashing installation. In addition to the drip flashing, you should check that the gutters are properly affixed. They should be sloped toward the downspouts, but are they securely attached to the fascia ...


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