Hot answers tagged

41

I would build a decorative arbor over the path. Its purpose would be to camouflage a basic gutter and downspout arrangement that dumps into the pond. Simple as can be. Image source


23

You could call it an "inverted syphon"... I'm searching for a word here, but it's not coming to me. Build a leak-tight pipe that starts at the house above the top of the pond wall. The pipe goes down, underground, laterally to the pond, up the exterior of the pond wall, then over the wall and dumps into the pond. This pipe will be pressurized so ...


23

Neither. It's labeling paint. It was either sprayed onto the entire lumber unit or this truss set for identification. source


20

Never, ever, feed them after midnight! Like gremlins, rubber roofs are very special and cool... But they have rules. You can get a rubber roof wet. You can expose it to direct sun. But you can't put tar on it! Ever. Not even a little. That product has a lot of fancy-dancy language designed to convince you to buy it. But it's tar-based, like any such ...


20

There are really two reasons to rake a roof (snow weight and ice dams), and there are two reasons not to rake (effort and roofing damage). Raking to reduce snow weight If you're concerned that the weight of accumulated snow will exceed load design limits, by all means pull some snow off. You don't want a collapse. This is a rare situation in northern ...


15

No contractor needed. Cut a piece of 1/2" plywood 3-1/2" X 12", drill 10 screw holes in it, slather it with glue and screw it on there. Might be overkill, but should do the job.


14

If you need to fix this so you can sleep better at night, any carpenter would be able to sister this truss for a repair. In my humble opinion though, no repair is needed. If you look around up there, there' a good chance you'll see notches cut all the way through for cables, conduit, pipes, etc.


12

Clearly this has been a problem for a while and also the standing water and patch job on the flat section of the roof is to blame. There is no real shortcut here, as you can see, so the solution is to remove the roofing, repair the water damage, and then have it re-roofed properly. There are ways to apply a flat roof so that it will not leak but slathering ...


12

You should not be touching your shingles when raking. If you have 5" on roof you don't need to touch it. If you have 24" on roof you don't need to rake the last two inches. Also rake in the early morning so sunlight helps distribute water/ice better. There isn't general advice to give because it is dependent on the amount of snow on your roof,...


10

As others have said, whether to rake or not depends on your circumstances. See the picture: I have a steep poorly insulated roof over my home that extends out over an unheated garage and becomes more shallow there. Snow melts on the steep part and water flows down under the snow to the unheated shallower roof where it refreezes and forms a dam anywhere on ...


8

Run your down spouts into barrels. Plumb these barrels together into a central feed. These can run underground if you'd like, so long as the pipes have the proper slope, gravity will be your friend. Have a sump pump (or other, float-activated pump) pump the water up and over the retaining wall. Depending on how full your pond normally is and how much rain ...


8

How about drilling holes and using bolts, washers and nuts? This will be structurally stronger than a million nails driven in from both sides.


7

The conventional way to deal with this type of serious problem is to call in some tree service professionals. They know all the proper techniques to safely remove a fallen tree and may even have a crane truck that can be used to hoist pieces of the tree as it is cut apart. Tree removal is dangerous work and you should not attempt this on a DIY basis unless ...


7

Sometimes the stars align and answers are provided. After i posted my comment this morning I was watching a previous episode of This old house in which they are restoring a New England Victorian house that is regulated by the local historic commission. One of the requirements needed to be met was the restoration of the Yankee Gutters. A web search led me ...


7

Yes, I would definitely disconnect roof trusses from the top plate of interior non-bearing walls. In fact truss manufacturers require it. When bottom chords of trusses rest on top plates it puts the bottom chord in “double bending” and the trusses are not designed for that kind of stress. In fact truss manufacturers recommend a clip that fastens to the top ...


6

I've run into this often and have become very successful at getting into corners of the attic I never thought I'd be able to. Sometimes you have to flat crawl on the joists. What has also worked is cutting out a square in the wall inside the room at the ceiling height and using that as a pull station. You will probably have to drill through a sill plate but ...


6

Plumbing vents (in the USA, anyway) are normally not covered. Rain will end up the same place as any other wastewater in a properly built system, and does not amount to much, given the size of the pipe. Animal entry is not unheard of, but is rare. In the unfortunate event, they also normally end up (dead) where the wastewater goes - I've see a sewage pump ...


5

Your problem is going to be finding where the leak is coming from. I have found leaks that came in more than 10’ from the entry point. The water can travel under the rolled roofing and drip down at a seam then run on the rafters especially double plates prior to finally coming down. Today I use a FLIR camera I can see the water when it is traveling between ...


5

I'd say it has guttering… but perhaps nowhere to go. The moulding round the top edge certainly looks gutter-shaped, it has sealed corners, all very 'guttery'. What it doesn't seem to have is a fall-pipe, so it will either just fill up if those gutter-ends are sealed, or pee down onto the paving if they're not. It also seems designed that the rear face is ...


5

TL;DR You will probably compress your roof and make things structurally worse using "permanent" ratchet straps. With the ratchet straps you are only hiding a symptom which can be seen from inside your home. It would make things structurally worse in the long run. Look at your roof line from the outside, is the ridge starting to do something like ...


5

There are ways of setting up portable scaffold towers to handle this: Setting them up is usually left to professionals though.


4

isherwood is correct. Some so called roofers don't normally inspect anything under the sheathing. A Roofer is not a carpenter by definition. But then they are not being asked to build a wall or staircase now are they? A Roofer makes all decisions as to the structure of a roof. That means a Roofer works on, makes decisions on structure, load bearings, ...


4

My house is framed similarly, mid 1950's. No I would not remove any of the "temporary" supports you've pointed out. Like you said, the vertical ones are to help support the ridge board and keep it from sagging. I have those in my attic also, and have even doubled up on some of them. The long diagonal board is to keep the gabled end of the roof, ...


4

Those are stiffeners, as you suspected. Large roof systems require stabilization of those long members. The truss plan provides schedules for the carpenters to follow in adding them on-site. It makes transport simpler. I don't think it would jeopardize the integrity of the truss by shifting them flush to one side of the truss member, but you'd need an ...


4

You need a WRB on that roof somewhere One thing all roofs need is some way to shed water. Asphalt shingle roofs use the shingles themselves as the primary water-resistive barrier (WRB), often backed up by a secondary barrier (roofing felt). Other roof technologies, such as metal roofs, have their WRB underneath the roof cladding instead. However, this ...


4

borrow or rent a nail gun. they shoot so fast that noting will move.


4

Stainless Steel If you want the best in corrosion protection, pick a metal that is difficult to corrode. Stainless steel is not impossible to corrode (there are various grades of stainless), but it survives in any outdoor environment and usually stays as shiny as the day you bought it. It even survives the highly corrosive environment inside pressure-treat ...


3

There are situations where water pooling on a flat roof is a problem, but this probably isn't one of them. The cases where it's a problem are where water pools, the weight of the water deforms the roof structure, so more water pools, so the roof deforms more and collapse results. You appear to have a relatively small area of poorly graded surface near the ...


3

Use an end nipper to cut them flush: Brand name on image included deliberately as this is an endorsement because quality products give better performance.


3

I finally got a licensed engineer out to take a look at this. The working theory is that the truss was damaged when the home was built, some 30+ years and 2+ owners ago. The rest of the truss system looks like it's in good shape. Sounds like I'm either the first person to notice this or the first person to care. The solution they drew up was to put a 30"...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible