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3

Unlikely. Electric dryers generally require 240V/30A circuits, to get enough power for drying. That requires #10 wire (in copper). On the other hand, 120V circuits are very rare above 20A. So the wire you have is most likely #12 (in copper), unsuitable for a 30A circuit. In addition, the existing 120V/20A circuit is likely only two wires (hot/neutral) plus ...


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I would focus on replacing the consumer unit. Once you have RCDs (or better: RCBOs per circuit), the state of the wiring becomes less critical. As far as earths, the fact that your wiring was done inside pipes (conduits) is very important. Generally the pipes are installed before the wires are, so it's no trouble installing additional wires (or pulling all ...


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I would not change expensive inlets. I would not carve up expensive generator cords, unless they are already homebrew (field-assembled) and already have a replaceable socket. I would build or buy an adapter cable that has a plug that goes into the generator, and an inline socket that accepts your existing 4-wire cable. If you build it, you will need to ...


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Short Answer From the comments, I am pretty sure that this can't (maybe not can't but shouldn't) be done. Longer Answer Even if we did rewire the cord to the 3-prong plug, it wouldn't run the 240V appliances that we would be needing to run (in case of a power outage or something). I wish I had realized this before I asked this question making me look stupid....


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This is a case for re-marking wire colors to indicate function There's a lot of subtle stuff going on here, along with a blatant mis-wiring/Code violation regarding wire markings. However, this thing would be dog-simple if you could just visualize it. I'm a huge fan of using wire colors for that, and the key to that is using colored electrical tape to re-...


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You can't "split cables". All wiring must be grouped (minimum pair hot/neutral or switched hot/neutral, but sometimes three = hot/travelers or switched hot/travelers etc.). This isn't just to keep track of things, though it does help with that. It is because of the way electricity (alternating current) works. The end result is either cables (2 or 3 ...


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Using the term "GFCI" indicates you are in North America. If you replace the wiring without conduit, it must be a minimum of 24 inches deep, with conduit used to rise above that depth into the lamp post / receptacle box. If you don't want to dig a trench that deep, you can use PVC conduit at 18 inches deep, or galvanized rigid or IMC steel conduit ...


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