9

PVC is relatively inexpensive so the main cost is installing it. If your furnace is near an exterior wall, they'll simply make a hole in that wall and run the lines directly out. If your furnace isn't close to an exterior wall, then you need to run the lines through the ceiling, preferably in the direction of the joists, until you reach an exterior wall. If ...


8

The issue is thermal... and we're fighting two completely separate types of thermal wars. The war on fire: Incandescent bulbs don't care about heat, they love it, they love being oven lights. They also create a lot of it! A 40W bulb makes 39 watts of heat and 1 watt of light. So with incandescent, the war is to keep the incandescent's heat from setting ...


6

Cutting Cast Iron Pipe The most common and quickest way to cut cast iron is the by the use of snap cutters. There are two types: scissors and ratachet. You can also cut cast iron with (in order of fastest to slowest) angle grinder, a reciprocating saw or a hacksaw. In order to use a grinder, you'll need room all around the pipe. Connecting to Cast Iron ...


6

I would consider cutting the whole mess out at the bottom end and connect A new “ABS” black pipe with a “no hub” it is a rubber connector with bands on each end to tighten then tie into the upper area . This will be much easier than packing oakum and poring the lead on top; everything can be fitted together prior to gluing so you know it is right where ...


6

I think you'll have to get one of these vapor barrier boxes, and fit it before installing your electrical box. Seal up where the cable penetrates, then install your electrical box. The other options would be to cut a larger hole and patch drywall, or seal it up from the back side (but that would require access to the other side of the wall/ceiling).


6

Is it expensive? Well that depends on your definition of "expensive", the amount of work you need to do, and who you get to do the work. 90% efficient furnaces require PVC venting directly outside, as opposed to using a chimney like the older 80% furnaces do. The extra expense is entirely dependent on how easy it is to route these pipes from your furnace to ...


6

Not unless you wrap the entire length in green electrical tape, or you wired the circuit with 4 AWG or larger conductors. National Electrical Code says that equipment grounding conductors can be bare, covered, or insulated. It goes on to say "Individually covered or insulated equipment grounding conductors shall have a continuous outer finish that is either ...


5

Four inch and six inch recessed fixtures consist of two main parts - the can and the trim. They need to match. The first issue will be getting the old can out. If it is old-work style, it may be held in just by pressure clips on the sides, fairly easy to remove. If it is new-work style, it will be attached to framing members, either directly or with a brace ...


4

Just get replacement windows instead of new construction and use tapcons to fasten the windows through the sides. Caulk outside good to keep out water. Foundation should also be graded away from the window to keep out water.


4

This conference presentation (PDF) seems to lay out the process fairly well. It also mentions a few resources that go into more detailed calculations and considerations. The Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors’ National Association has an overview guide available here (PDF) for improving efficiency. They also have entire standards available for ...


3

I would need to see pictures of what said bulbs look like in your current cans but I can tell you that they sell thousands of varieties of recessed lighting trim for 6 inch cans. I am almost positive you can find trim that will work for your 4 inch retrofits and you don't have to touch the drywall.


3

This seems like a clever marketing strategy; as mentioned by Gregmac and Bmitch, the extra cost for the 90% install can be quite variable; you might want to start with an estimate, so you have the facts. In general, I would only consider this if you think your existing furnace is at the end of its life; otherwise, you might as well wait until you reach that ...


3

My new house was built with a high efficiency condensing furnace and the pipes they use look just like lawn sprinkler pipes. Low pressure PVC pipes like these are very cheap for materials and very easy to work with. Almost any tool can cut them and joints are just glued. In my case, the pipes just ran straight to the nearest exterior wall, outside and then ...


3

18awg is small for power wires. With 5VAC 2A: At 20ft you're going to get ~4.5V At 40ft, about ~4.0V. For comparison, if it was 16awg, at 20ft you'd get ~4.7V. With 22awg, at 20ft you'd get ~3.7V. You should check the specs on the camera: they'll often give a voltage tolerance. On top of that, some transformers (especially cheap ones) don't exactly ...


3

Yes - I would try the LED Flood light first which generate less heat than incandescent. This is less work than trying to convert the current can mounts to 4" round to mount the flat panels that are mounted by a crossbar in the outlet box. Flat panels don't need a can, but still needs feed outlet, either for power and some for the mounting point. Below is ...


3

I would caution to not remove anything you do not know what it controls. House fans are common, an exhaust fan in the attic? I caution that trying to make resistance measurements is normally a waste of time and I have seen a lot of ruined meters when DIY folks and apprentices have measured live circuits. Why are resistance measurements questionable? A ...


2

You might be able to, depending on the power requirements of the camera and the size (gauge) of the wire. If the wire is quite small and the camera demands a lot of current, it may not work. Length of wire is also a factor. The buzz-word for this is "voltage drop". Some electronic devices are less immune to voltage drop than other devices. Some camera ...


2

Why not build your closet wall along the dotted line, but end it at the inset near the window. Build a short return wall to the edge of the inset. Then on the short wall to the left of the window, build in a bookshelf ceiling to floor that is slightly less deep than the closet wall (inset about 2-3") and just short of the window trim. You could also build ...


2

I think what you have is a mechanical thermocouple sensor that is connected to the regulator. This is the same as one would have in an RV. They do not use any electricity, and the thermostat is part of the gas regulator. The only remote I am aware of would be a remote thermocouple. I'm not sure if your unit has a removable sensor. If it does, then you can ...


2

I've done this. I have a great solution. Simply take the hot circuit to the sensor and to the light switch and run them in parallel. The only downfall is that you won't be able to turn the light off when the sensor has control. But I haven't found this to be a problem.


2

All motion detectors have an override mode. Typically this is done by either flipping the wall switch off/on in a certain pattern, or by a switch on the motion head. Thing is, when you put it in override mode every one I have seen reverts back to motion after the next night/day cycle. I have NEVER seen a motion detector that has a permanent manual override ...


2

Wear. The overlays appear to be solid hardwood. The plywood is a thin veneer over other non hardwood plys. As the steps wear, you run the risk of wearing through the veneer. Even if you don't, if you need to refinish, you again risk sanding through that thin top layer. In my old house, the bottom stair had a worn dip in the middle (reputedly eroded by my ...


2

My guess is that you really don't want to shrink the holes that the existing 6" recessed lights are in. That requires a lot of drywall skill, paint color matching, paint blending, and a lot of work to make your ceiling look as good as it does now. Instead, I think you should consider LEDs with a 6" baffle trim. This video shows an example: http://www....


2

Floorplan is not enough. They need to visit and take extensive measurements to engineer the system. If you want "bells and whistles" (there's lots of options) you need to decide on those too. They will need to investigate the location, size, and routing of the service main as well. They should be able to determine minimum requirements for your locale by ...


2

While you may be able to do this yourself. There are many pitfalls, stumbling blocks, and code nuances that rookies are just not aware of. My advice is to get an experienced HVAC contractor involved, at least during the planning process. Once the system is planned out, carrying out that plan is a fairly DIY friendly job. Unless of course, you have to deal ...


2

The Tospo is a cheap Chinese ballast. To find ballasts, start with what bulbs will fit in the fixture (all the better if you have a bulb already). Then search for ballasts meant to drive that bulb (which also fit in your fixture). I think I see several on 1000bulbs.com in the $20 range. LED strips really, really do not like to bend on the flat side. ...


2

Devices exist which are basically heaters with timers, which can be mounted under a traditional thermostat to bias it toward turning the heat off sooner. By juggling the two settings, this can be made to work somewhat like a setback thermostat. Mostly obsolete, since not very efficient, but useful in cases where the owner forbids installing a real smart ...


2

First, that fixture looks permanently hardwired. If so, you'll want to add a ballast disconnect. Code requires it, unless you argue that the fixture is now ballastless. But it's so darn convenient that I add them immediately upon starting work, and then, turn the power back on! Cutting the wires off at the ballast is someting I only do to ballasts which ...


2

I'd use a saddle box instead Instead of trying to cobble together something out of two different boxes, raising issues of access to the upper box, I would use a saddle box that fits around the rafter instead, as shown below (photo for exposition only). This provides adequate space for splicing while allowing easy access to all the wiring here just by ...


2

Each window manufacturer has an engineering department that can help you calculate the maximum size for your particular location. Each region in the U.S. has a wind load requirement. Based on that wind load, each brand of window and each series (style of window) can only support a maximum window size. Here’s their customer service info: https://www....


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