Hot answers tagged

62

This is a job for vise grips. What I would do is file the bolt flat on two sides. Don't take off so much that you significantly compromise its strength - just flatten the threads. These flat sides will enable you to grip it with a pair of large vise grips. That should provide sufficient leverage to remove the bolt. Take it a bit at a time.


26

Say you try one of the other proposed approaches in the other answers and the screw is just stubborn and more of the shaft keeps snapping off... Consider that you might not need to remove the screw at all. In a worst case, you can almost always snap off the screw close to the base of the wall (maybe a little grinding with a rotary tool like a Dremel to fully ...


22

The existing clip has been crimped on with a crimping tool from the factory. To remove the clamp grip the end of the strap just below the notches and lift it up and back. The notches should bend up as you lift. If they don't pry them up with a slotted screwdriver. replace with a common hose clamp of nominal size.


19

I believe the key words here are "years ago" and "motion sensor". Motion sensors don't generally live that long. It may be time for a new fixture, or if modular, a new motion sensor.


19

I would just clamp my drill's chuck on that puppy and spin it out.


15

Another possible strategy; if you can get 2 nuts onto the threaded bar and turn them against each other they will practically lock into each other, this should allow you then to use a regular spanner, shifter or vice grips to loosen and remove the bolt. Make sure your only turning the first nut and not the second or the effect is lost. If you have it a ...


13

A well-equipped hardware store will have a drawer with many common fasteners used in this type of flatpack furniture. I mean well-equipped. Home Depot is not a hardware store. ACE or better. Preferably that family-owned hardware store that has been there for 80 years and has creaky floors and weird little mezzanines with things just crammed everywhere. ...


13

They're called ear clamps, they start out life looking like this: To attach them, the band with the holes is hooked up as tightly as ossible so those "fingers" poke through the holes, and then a tool like this: Is used to squeeze the lump in the clip and reduce the circumference, squeezing the clip together. It ends up looking more like the ...


12

The most common cause of melting/burned terminals is a failure in the heating element. These often fail in a way that allows the heating element, which is encased inside a metallic tube with an insulating layer, to make electrical contact with the tube. In most cases when this happens, it causes excess current to be drawn from the panel and the circuit ...


12

There are sacrificial bolts (shear pins) that break on purpose if you hit something solid (like a rock). Check for them. It generally replaces just like a bolt (with a nut on one end, but it might use a cotter pin or similar). But DO NOT USE A BOLT. It needs to be able to shear, so get the right part (they are VERY common - should be no issue). Check the ...


12

I wish comments would allow pictures, but what you have is something generically called a "push on fastener" I have to disagree with jsotola, I consider them "barely reusable", they often break when when removing, esp. if old. I wouldn't count on being able to re-use it. I attached a pic of something what I think is close to what you ...


11

You can change it so it opens the opposite direction. I.E. Flip the door over and attach the hinges to the left side of the cabinet. You can remove door by removing the screw on each hinge that holds them to the cabinet frame. Once you have the door un-atached you can measure where the holes are, from top and bottom, on the right side and transfer those ...


11

Some of the other answers are worth trying but IMO a 1/4" lag bolt embedded 5 inches in wood, presumably without a pilot hole, and tightened to the point the head broke off is not coming out with any reasonable effort. I'd saw it off and work around it .... 2 minutes of relatively little effort.


11

Use a plumber wrench. In general more force and better fit jaws for the task than vise grips: Edit upon comment by jay613: Since it's 5" wood. Drill a hole next to the screw, file the screw and then use the wrench. Or save the money by not buying the wrench and go for the answer by jay613 (saw or drill several holes). I also found out that it may be ...


11

TL;DR: Other options (described below) include: (1) Chuck bolt directly into drill. (2) Cut slot in bolt and use screw driver. (3) Cut flats on bolt and use socket driver. (4) Use two nuts to provide gripping surface. (5) Destructive brute force with a hammer. (5b) Destructive brute force with a crowbar. (6) Cut the bolt flush to the wall. (7) Keep the bolt ...


10

You've got it! Make sure that you use matching black ABS pipe, not white PVC get glue appropriate for ABS, not PVC make sure you clean off the drain pipe so the glue will adhere properly since you've got a fair bit of room to work, cut your straight pipes far enough back that you can easily work with them do not try cut right at the edge of the T, your ...


10

What jurisdiction is this located in? In most places in the US it is illegal for a non-licensed person to do electrical work in a rental. Technically even buying a part for this device and replacing it would be a violation and absolutely repairing the circuit board in it would be a repair and thus illegal if you tried doing it. And if your idea is you are ...


10

It might be possible to get a replacement plastic part from somewhere like Shower Doc, but it's your landlady's responsibility to pay for the work and get it done by a qualified tradesperson, immediately.


10

Tap size chart and Drill Size Chart are the useful search terms. Most any useful tap size chart will have the drill size listed. A drill size chart will help you sort out the relative sizes of drills in fractional inch, number, letter, and metric sizes. Taps you can get at the hardware store may simplify the process by being packaged with the correct tap ...


9

Start by removing the mailbox from whatever it is supported by - the plastic mailbox "post" is a sleeve that's set over some actual post. It may just slip on (so you can just lift it off) or it may have a few screws you need to remove before you can lift it off. (It appears to be this model of "Step2" mailbox, and the assembly ...


8

Ultimately, I decided to save it. I used stacks of cribbing with large beams to jack the building up off of the failing foundation walls. Similar to this (much larger) example: Once I had it up on the crib stacks, I was able to remove the jacking beams, pour concrete footers/piers, and set 6x6 posts. The building now rests on those posts and sits firmly. ...


8

Is this ceiling fan going to fall? There is nothing in the photo that tells me a fall is about to happen, but the installation looks poor, and I think you need to get under that cover. Will it cut your head off? No, if the physical support let’s go, it will dangle by it’s wiring like a wounded buzzard, but probably give you time to get clear. A bonk with a ...


8

The glue normally used is a pvc cement and « welds » the joint together. I would cut that tee out and fit a new one with extensions to meet up with the existing pipes using couplers. When you get the old part out, try separating a joint - they tend to « tear » the surface.


7

If you think about the forces your wheel encounters as it rolls over the floor carrying 30+ pounds, being twisted all over the place, it might be unsurprising how the attempts so far with glue/paper have failed. These things retain themselves by the hole in the plastic carrying some sort of restriction so the wheel can be hammered onto the shaft, and the ...


7

Do I need to set the water heater to pilot, in order to avoid the dangerous scenario outlined above? Doing anything to our water heater makes me a bit nervous. NO, In the amount of time that it will take you change the valve there will be no issues with it set to the current temperature. Once you turn the water off, even if someone opened a hot water faucet ...


7

Use two nuts (if the thread is damaged so that you can't put any nut on, saw off a small part of the end), fasten them against each other, then use your spanner on one to turn the bolt. This is so standard a practice that it's routinely used to fasten or remove studs that don't have a bolt head to start with. :-)


6

Yes, you'll simply cut all three pipes back a ways and rebuild using couplers, as you suggested. I would do the vertical joints first, cementing them all at once so you can twist them well during assembly. You should then be able to flex it leftward enough to get the drain parts in place. However you go about it, have a plan. Cemented parts don't come apart ...


6

You shouldn't be seeking out that connector. The problem is, you have not removed the fan. You've removed only part of the fan assembly. The thing that plugs into is more parts of the fan assembly. Remove it too. That particular fan is designed to break into halves: there's the half that mounts in the ceiling (first) and then half that latches into it once ...


6

We managed to contact a family friend. They told us that these aren't reusable and have to be broken to be removed. We snapped the lip off with pliers to remove it and it came right off.


6

I have had 5+ batteries brought to me that show full charge to no charge but do similar or slightly less. In all of them they had been heavily discharged according to the owners. All of them had melted a solder joint connecting to the battery pack. I was able to reflow the solder and save the packs in all of the cases. 2 of them showed no charge but it was ...


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