New answers tagged

0

I agree with others to clean prior to calking. I do not like pressure washers on stained or almost bare wood it really can tear the soft grain up and leave it looking like crap. I prefer cleaning the wood with deck cleaners or hydrogen peroxide. The hydrogen peroxide will kill the mold and brighten the wood (sometimes people don’t want bright) I purchase ...


0

That's a nice lookin' place! Well worth the effort to spiff it up!! Swap steps 2 & 3. Caulk will peel off when any loose material under it gives way. You want a good, solid, well attached substrate before any caulking, staining or painting. If you're renting a lift, you can apply the pressure washer pointed down from above, just get more hose and a ...


1

The most important part of painting is preparation. You will want to remove all loose and flaking paint and you will want to remove all rust, which will probably involve scraping and grinding with power tools. You will want to carefully inspect any paint that appears to be well adhered. You want to make sure that it is still stuck and that there isn't rust ...


1

I bet the problem is just a slight mismatch in the sheen of the old and new paint. Color and sheen can change on old paint as it ages. As long as the color match is pretty good, paint the whole wall with your matching paint. Once the whole wall is the same color and sheen, it'll be indistinguishable.


0

You do NOT have to replace an oil tank unless you suspect active leakage. What you would need to do here is just clean it with steel wool, sand it, prime it with rustoleum rusty metal primer, then use either high temp paint or farm implement paint and a roller, let it dry and ta daa done.


-2

First, you made a big mistake. You relied on Google reviews. It's known by everyone that the reviews are completely unreliable. Google is one of the worst rating systems. Yelp is much more accurate but you also have to be careful. Currently, no rating system is even close to perfect so you have to look at several rating systems and read them to find out ...


5

You should give the old paint a light sand to provide a “key” so the new paint will cover well. a fine grade sandpaper is all that is needed. A light sand is just enough to see gentle scratch marks in the surface and not heavy enough to go through into the layer beneath. If you don’t then when you put the new paint on it may not cover easily or when it dries ...


1

I ended up priming it first and then repainting. That was also suggested by an employee of the paint department of a major home improvement store. Here are a set of suggested steps. 1- Clean from the very top near shingles so that debris does not get into fresh paint. 2- Pressure wash from a distant using a wide spray. Pay attention to the underside of ...


Top 50 recent answers are included