35

Use painters tape (blue tape, Frog tape, lots of different names and brands) to mask off the areas you don't want to paint green. First, paint your ceiling and 3 walls white (2 or 3 coats, however many are needed) and wait for the paint to dry. Then, apply the painters tape to those walls and ceiling as close to the 4th wall as possible. Next, and this is ...


33

Three things: Yes, you were supposed to apply a primer. Fresh joint compound and drywall soak up paint like crazy. The primer serves to seal the joint compound and drywall and create a consistent surface. However, you've already painted - and the paint will do the same thing - just not as effectively and you'll probably need to do a third coat. Paint ...


28

These are consumables You wouldn't worry about reusing a rubber glove or a paper towel. If it's pristine, sure... But generally you don't expect to. That roller cover is $3, the hot dog is $1 and the brush is $2. Stannius makes a good point about buying a quality brush and taking care of it. That idea actually harkens back to the age when ...


18

In my experience, tape just doesn't do that well. Even if you get a clean line, you're at the mercy of the tape's shape, and it's following the texture. It often ends up looking artificially sharp and jaggy. Instead, use what I call the twitch technique, which is a variation of the standard cut-in. Load your brush on one side, just an inch deep or so. ...


8

First I "paint out" the brush (try to paint scrap material, cardboard etc.) until the brush is too dry to paint. Then: Latex paints Assuming I have flowing tap water on site, I rinse the brush with lots of water, we're talking gallons. Then when most of the paint is out of it, I start working in whichever hand or dish soap is convenient, both the clean ...


7

Assuming you have fixed the water problem (if not, give up), why not simply attach drywall directly to the entire surface. You may be able to adhere it with construction adhesive. If not, use screws, if necessary, with anchors behind them. If it is available, consider moisture resistant drywall or even paperless. You can then put on any surface finish you ...


7

I think you're going to be much less frustrated if you just buy a new roller brush. Those are meant to be disposable and not to be stored for long periods. You can get away with short term re-use by wrapping them in a plastic bag and freezing them overnight but once the paint has set and cured, its done.


6

There's one tip that was completely missed, and should have been at the start: When painting over a surface that has had to be repaired or was very dirty (scrub it clean first), get both the paint and the primer tinted to the same color. As long as you buy the paint/primer in the same brand and they are both the same base, you will have exact match. This ...


6

You need to remove flaking and loose paint or else it will eventually chip off and be a hazard in itself. One approach is to avoid sanding and do a moderate scraping with a carbide paint scraper. This will generate some flakes which can be much more easily contained than dust from sanding. Vacuum with a shop vac and wear a mask. Then prime and paint ...


6

As @Nick2253 commented, sanding between coats promotes better adhesion of the next coat. This occurs because a rougher surface has more area and "features" for the next coat to grab onto. That's why it's easier to scrape paint off of a smooth surface like glass than a relatively rough one like wood. Sanding also helps remove any bumps from dust that's ...


6

The paint likely does not match perfectly, either in color or in amount of gloss. Those color matching machines can be hit or miss... If it bothers you - paint the entire wall with the new paint and you’ll never notice the slight difference in color.


6

Ceilings are typically painted with a flat sheen paint, as it's good at hiding (or at least not highlighting) imperfections, nor does it need to be particularly durable. Those two qualities tend to lead to a less expensive paint, and if you can save money where you can, why not. If you've already got some leftover (non-glossy) paint, there's no real reason ...


6

I would put a wood frame around/over it then cover the frame with a hardboard then decorate that. Many times that an internal framed wall has been removed to find things behind.


6

You should give the old paint a light sand to provide a “key” so the new paint will cover well. a fine grade sandpaper is all that is needed. A light sand is just enough to see gentle scratch marks in the surface and not heavy enough to go through into the layer beneath. If you don’t then when you put the new paint on it may not cover easily or when it dries ...


5

As we always advise, the secret to a good paint job is proper preparation. It can be a pain, but you must remove all loose and peeling paint, wash the surface and Spackle holes and cracks before priming and painting. Often a light sanding is a good idea, especially on any glossy finishes. Be aware of lead hazards on any paint applied before 1978. The actual ...


5

Do I need to sand or is a good wash down enough? Or maybe a liquid sander? A good wash, followed by a thorough drying, followed by a light sanding with fine grit sand paper to rough up the existing surface. Sanding ensures the new paint will get a good grip on the old paint. Do I need to prime, or is the old paint (cleaned a bit) good enough? No, ...


5

If the present paint on the doors is indeed sticking very well and the surface finish is conducive to overcoating then I would recommend a process to fill in the peeled out areas with a spackle or drywall mud. Apply one of these materials with a putty knife, let it dry and then lightly sand to get a smooth even surface. Sometimes it is necessary to apply a ...


5

Given the direct flame exposure, and that the flames are actually quite a bit hotter than BBQ paint is rated for (1950C for natural gas, 2392C for propane) I'd suggest sticking to clean, coat with vegetable oil (wipe on a thin layer) and bake. This makes a pretty good finish, and does not involve anything that's not going to happen in normal food preparation ...


5

Your best shot at that would have been to take a large enough chip from the damaged portion of the wall before it was repaired, take it to a paint store to have it computer color matched. There would have been only a chance it would been an exact match still. Your next best bet if it is close enough, is to paint the wall corner to corner, at least it would ...


5

Answer: yes, if scraping and thorough sanding (coarse, then medium, then fine grit) until smooth does not remove the old paint than feel free to prime and paint right over it. Do not pay attention to those that say "you must test for compatibility with the new paint" or "don't paint it with latex (water-based) paint if it might be old alkyd (oil-based) ...


5

If the walls are in good condition then why would you even have to anticipate sanding? Prepare the surfaces by cleaning them well using a bucket of hot water and TSP (trisodium phosphate) cleaner. Make sure to wear protective rubber gloves. This will get years of dirt and gunk off the walls to make it a good place for new paint to adhere. The TSP will even ...


5

Since you have the original paint and it appears to be good, I would get a roller and work the entire area with a 2nd coat, I would work from the patches out so the roller is not putting as much paint out towards the edges this will help to fade the change in new to old and the second coat should cover the patches to not be noticable, with this said you may ...


4

It should normally be many years, if not decades, before paint starts to peel. Cracking may occur as the house settles, but that is usually due to the structure shifting and not a poor paint job. If the paint was not applied properly (eg, surface not prepared correctly), it may peel earlier, or this may indicate another major problem such as moisture in the ...


4

Whatever generates the least dust. Hand wash (least dust) Hand scraping Hand sanding (wet if possible) Power sanding (most dust) (should be connected to HEPA vac Murphy oil soap (trademark for soap recommended for wood) on the dirty sections. Prime with the best, most tenacious primer. Pros must follow the EPAs RRP rules: mask off work areas, put down ...


4

Yes you can paint them with high heat BBQ grill paint. You can find this paint at any hardware store, walmart or lowes etc. It is rated for 1400 degrees normally. Be aware, however, that the surface in contact with your pans will wear off fairly quickly. I personally would paint the grates, then burnish the paint off where it makes contact with the pans so ...


4

Eight months probably wouldn't be enough time for standing water to have caused much significant damage to the decking, and from the pictures it looks like it is fairly sound. Also, in that the timespan we're talking about was over the winter, it wouldn't have been a whole lot different than normal ice and snow accumulation. The one thing that you should ...


4

Priming and Painting Galvanized Metal, condensed from KILZ.com, other manufacturers also make specific paints and primers for galvanized metal. The galvanizing process, which is designed to prevent rust, leaves an oily film that can prevent coating adhesion. The zinc in galvanized metal can produce a milky “white rust” (which is common when it has weathered)...


4

The basic process I would use is Find out what type of paint was used (both primer and top-coat) so that I can obtain and apply a compatible paint. If I couldn't find out, I'd try overpainting a small area in an inconspicuous position and see what happens. Sand it flat using increasingly fine grades of sandpaper, then clean it. Buy new paint and carefully ...


4

If you want the boards to look brand spanking new again, you will want to go with method one. I'd use a heat gun to do it, and not the harsh chemical strippers. Either method takes about as long as the other and the heat gun method is less toxic, and, you either already have a heat gun and don't need to spend money, or you'll buy one and have it for a long ...


4

One thing I use to prep surfaces is scotch bright pads. The green ones are what I use most often they conform to shapes and really take the sheen or gloss out with very little effort. They have red that is Heavier or more corse or white that is finer but green works quite well for irregular surfaces.


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