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4

Don't do it! Former boxer here. I put up a mounting kit in my joists in an apartment I had in college... I split both joists it was mounted too. I was using a 100lb water bag and weight makes a huge difference. But I don't care if it is 25lb. Don't do it. Buy a pole and mount it to that and they sell punching bag stands. The link isn't an ...


4

Very interesting situation. First off, replacing perfectly good vinyl windows is not going to help you from what I see on your pics. Simple weeping drains around windows is not going to help much with all the moisture I see on walls, ceilings and floor. I would suggest you have someone come in with an infrared scanner and make a sweep of the building to ...


2

"Deficient" render? That is a line of bull. Your use of damp proof course and render makes me think you are UK based. If so, you should have a guarantee of several years for the damp course work, and if so you should demand they fix the problem as they clearly missed a spot. Residual moisture? Don't make me laugh. They need to do fresh moisture measurements ...


2

Its an 8:1 ratio, it can be bags, cups, shovels, whatever measure you use as along as its 8 parts sand to 1 part cement. The area your looking to fill is it small where your measure will be cups or larger were you would use shovels. Once you know your unit of measure, you can use the right amount with little waste.


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No, brick & its mortar will be fine for 100-years in the weather. You can absolutely Stucco it as well & that will last almost the same amount of time. But, unless the Stucco would be done to match the rest of the exterior, then don't bother. It's just another potential future problem. However, you can treat the brickwork with a clear Masonry Sealer,...


1

Note: my answer demonstrates an advanced beginner level of knowledge of building science. I know just enough to think I know far more than I most likely really do, so take this answer with a grain of salt and consult a professional as well! Rand and Shirlock are probably onto something. Let me offer an alternative or perhaps more general hypothesis. Your ...


1

There are stucco crack patch products out there. For lack of a better explanation, they are essentially sanded caulk: Use that to fill in the cracks, then paint over with proper stucco paint (breathable latex).


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A drop of 150mm would work best if you did it in the summer so that the bricks below the DPC could dry out a bit. If you did it mid winter and another big freeze happened then these bricks could be subject to freezing and surface cracking / erosion. In general - if you do drop the garden by 150mm the bricks below the DPC would benefit from some form of ...


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