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7

Well, you really only need to punch one or two holes in the drywall to get it started, then you can simply pull it down with your bare hands. Assuming it's really just drywall and not something heavier. Sawing lines won't really help, however, as properly installed drywall has screws ALL OVER it - so just go with "punch hole and start pulling"...


6

We ended up using Krud Kutter Adhesive Remover, several pots of boiling water combined with a sturdy long handled floor scraper (& elbo grease) followed by a large orbital sander with 60 grit sanding screens. This still didn't get all of the adhesive off :( but we have enough off and it's smooth enough for us to paint the floor, based on what I've been ...


5

I use a plastic putty knife. Some of my guys even use plastic knives (yes the kind you use at bar-b-ques). The whole purpose is to scrape it off without damaging what is underneath. The plastic knives add a serrated cutting tool and the shape is better for cracks/smaller areas. Some things life (others) has taught me: WD-40 helps for some reason. ...


5

Tool rental places probably rent concrete grinders for big jobs like refinishing concrete floors and then you can use a sander that get get into corners. Floor Grinder Concrete Sander You can probably rent one or both of these, depending on the amount of glue. If it's just spotty you can probably use the hand sander. Like I said, these are for ...


4

I would knock it apart for easier lifting. You could've done a little experimenting and probably had it done in the time it took to post this. :)


4

Absolutely doable, though it may take a while. If your goal is to end up with wood that is usable for another project, then hammer and crowbar are the right tools. If your goal is simply to remove the shed and toss everything in a Dumpster, then a cutting tool such as a Sawzall: will make the project much easier. If you plan to reuse the wood, then ...


3

Instead of using a rope to wrap the pipe I would use a piece of heavy chain. The technique is to wrap the chain around the pipe several times and then connect the ends up short together leaving enough of a loop to poke a timber such as a 4x4 through the loop. Use a 4x4 about 8 to 10 feet long and use it as a lever over the top of a short fulcrum post. If the ...


3

Yes, if you have your heart set on removing them, then after you remove the outlet, tie the two black wires together with a wirenut, and tie the two white wires together. That way, you will still have power going to wherever the next electrical box is. For the ground, you can either screw it to the box, if it is a metal box and you can find a place to do ...


3

Brick Walls are usually load bearing or non-load bearing. Generally you can identify them by their width. While not "best practice", in some cases a connecting non-load bearing wall may act as a lateral brace to a long load bearing wall. This may be an issue in an earth-quake prone area where bracing walls are very important. Check with your local building ...


3

If the glue is still a bit tacky then first get a bag of flour and throw handfuls of it on the floor, sweep it around on the whole floor. That will make it much less messy to get up. Then get a 4-inch floor scraper with plenty of blades and go to town. Here is a picture of the scraper from Lowes. Although I would try to find one with a little longer handle. ...


3

Sawing drywall is pretty loud. The drywall acts like an amplifier for the sound. I would not recommend it as a quiet method. You can use a utility knife to cut the drywall. It would take several passes but it will work. Once a piece is cut you can pull it free. This might work for a small piece but would be a lot of work for a whole wall or room. You ...


3

I have had some luck with a hot oven and needle nose pliers getting stuck fixtures apart, make sure to unplug prior to doing this, also I have found that sometimes turning clockwise (tighting) then back counter clockwise can help break loose whatever is causing the glass to stick. After tightening if it backs out a little then start going back and forth and ...


2

Here is an idea to consider. If the tile comes off the cement board fairly easy, you could leave the cement board, scrape off the thinset and lay your foam and laminate over the cement board. Just a thought depending on the overall thickness you need to achieve.


2

Don't. Extra outlets that aren't unsightly only add value to your place, and adding a switch box cover to your current hole isn't really going to do much to change the aesthetic. If you are worried about a coat hanger or something accidentally getting stuck in one, just add a childproof outlet cover and call it a day.


2

The OP is probably fine with Ben's answer, HOWEVER, you should only nut the wires together if you are sure that they were previously connected, E.g, had taped-off the same outlet (that still had its linking bar intact). Two blacks and two whites could mean there is multiple circuits present. If turning off one single pole breaker killed all the power in ...


2

I'm having the same problem with the PB Bedford desk. I called the furniture dept. and they said on the drawer slides there's a lever and to push up on the one on the left and down on the one on the right and then pull the drawer out. The drawer slides in your pic look just like mine, so maybe this will work. I didn't have any luck, but it seems like a 2-...


2

Do you have sufficient variance between the house and your property line to allow for the addition of this shed there? Is there a zoning or housing code you need to check? Are you getting a permit for this? Most parts of the country require a building permit for anything that attaches to the residence. Having it permitted protects your future resale ...


2

it will tap/slide apart. if it's stiff (as mine were) then a place a slotted screwdriver on the metal bracket on the left hand side in the photograph and give it a tab using a hammer. This will help to avoid stressing the 3 screws used to hold this part of the fixing into the wood.


2

Good news - it came off! A Hot air gun was useless as was a butane torch - I suspect the heat was not softening anything and the adhesives were well and truely burned on. Perhaps spraying cold water on the hot glass might have helped crack it, but read on. In the end I used a teatowel in one hand to cup the entire fitting and then pushed an "automatic ...


2

You’re lucky, you will not need to add a support floor joist or beam provided: 1) the floor joists run the direction you show, 2) roof joists run the same direction as the floor joists, 3) the remaining second floor wall does not have a window (as shown), 4) the remaining second floor wall has a minimum of 1/2” plywood sheathing or 1/2” OSB board sheathing. ...


2

I'm assuming you don't have access to the backside of this conduit. If you did, you would just disassemble it - find the nearest coupler, uncouple it, and remove the pipe. Remember to remove these orphan wires entirely; all the way back to the previous junction box (or past it, if they go past it). You're not supposed to leave orphan wires, though.


1

To remove the last traces ready for the new layer, a product is available. It's called "silicone eater" or "silicone remover" here in the UK, and is sold with the sealants wherever there's a good selection of them. You really do need to get most of it off mechanically first, and it's always worth seeing if it just peels once you've made a start - sometimes ...


1

First, check the basics: Are you turning the right direction? It is easy to get backwards when you are in an unusual approach. Inspect the thread closely for the correct loosen direction. How long is the wrench? An 8 inch wrench is probably insufficient for loosening 1/2 inch copper fittings, though it probably is sufficient for tightening them. Try a ...


1

You could build a sloped frame and hinged doors, as @keshlam suggests, this is the traditional style. There are manufactured options that are actually rather reasonably priced. http://www.dashwindows.com/bilco-doors.php


1

It would be very useful if you could post a picture of what the existing framing looks like around the fan opening. Since it is unlikely that the joists are three feet apart there is a good chance that there are already framing headers across between two existing joists that take care of supporting the stub joist that was cut off across the fan opening. If ...


1

Pulling it out with long nose pliers is one option, but it often comes out in pieces if you do that. If you want to pull it out with a screw, you need to engage the screw enough to grip the plastic, but not enough to make it expand. This position may not exist, or if may be further out than you think. Sometimes a screw engaged just 2-3 turns will give you ...


1

if this is an anodized aluminum sill (thats what it looks like), try using brake fluid. it will destroy just about any paint bond out there. just wipe up afterwards and degrease with a good quality degreaser. be wary though, if its anything else other that anodized aluminum (or an other uncoated metal), the brake fluid will destroy the coating (even ...


1

I helped a friend solve this very mysterious situation recently. Although every range hood microwave I'd ever seen or installed had screws run through the shelf above, this one had screws from the side, through the faceframe of the adjacent cabinets. The screws were covered with plastic caps set flush with the rails, so they were nearly invisible. I don't ...


1

The use of two jack studs under each end of the header could have been done for any number of reasons. If the header supports a lot of weight from above it may have been deemed desirable to have the extra support on each end. If the header has an long span it is sometimes desirable to add additional support for the header. As you suggested it is possible ...


1

At the left corner (2nd photograph), push down the lip a bit with your finger, then it easily swivels out. Clean out the stuff in the reservoir. You can remove the part that the hose attaches to as well, be sure to put back the ball back into this part, it serves as a anti-back-flow valve


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