76

It's for a plug in clock. You hang the clock on the little hook, and the receptacle is backset so the plug does not interfere with the clock sitting flush against the wall.


61

It's in the Building and Electrical Codes You may have noticed that you can walk into a room that you've never been in before, and reach for a light switch, your hand has a really good chance of finding it. It's almost like magic, and it's so universal that people take it for granted. Actually, it's no accident. It's required by both the electrical and the ...


51

That is well within ANSI C84.1 North American Utlity Standards.


49

TLDR: an overhead light is a fine "outlet" here. I think the issue is NEC definition of outlet vs receptacle Outlet. A point on the wiring system at which current is taken to supply utilization equipment. Receptacle. A contact device installed at the outlet for the connection of an attachment plug, or for the direct connection of electrical ...


45

What you want is a decorator/duplex combination wall plate What you're after is a 2-gang wall plate with a decorator (Decora) opening on the left and a standard duplex opening on the right, like so: You should have no trouble finding one of these at the local big-box store.


39

Since the wire is 14/2, the breaker feeding it must be 15A. Someone apparently changed that to a 20A breaker (presumably because they were sick of constant breaker trips every time they attempted to use two heat appliances at once). Since that was done, you have the sense of "hey, do it even more". That "end justifies the means" POV ...


36

You can't do that! Don't switch any wires. That a 240 volt outlet, a 120 Volt line to each of the two brass screws and a ground on the old outlet. You plugged a 120 Volt appliance into a 120 Volt outlet wired for 240 Volts...... and probably ruined the microwave in the process. You need a neutral, white wire and one of the existing hot wires. Is there one in ...


31

TL;DR Remove the tab on the hot (red/black) side "A/B" plus the symptoms sounds like you have a Multi Wire Branch Circuit or MWBC. With an MWBC, you can have the top receptacle's hot on one part of the circuit and the bottom receptacle's hot on the other part of the circuit. Each receptacle is then 120V hot-to-neutral but the two hots are 240V ...


26

There is no need for tape inside a device box except perhaps as a wire colour marker (phase taping, etc). Outlets, switches, device boxes, cable, clamps, breakers - all of these devices have clear and specific installation methods that ensure they perform to the safety standards against which they are tested. Hacks like this do not count themselves among ...


26

This could have easily been done correctly if you had done the research beforehand that you are doing now... as things are, you have created a 120V socket that is supplying 240V... it did fry your microwave (sorry), and WILL fry anything else you plug in there. Except for cell phone chargers, weirdly, but forget that - change it back, or turn the circuit ...


23

Adding the short wire is called pigtails and it is code compliant so yes you can do this. Pigtails are a superior way of making connections in my opinion. The pigtails do not add to the wire volume in the box.


22

Easy. Just get a round to single gang adapter like this: Amazon even suggests this is bought together with an in-use cover and GFCI, so you are clearly not the only one with this problem. If you don't have GFCI on this circuit, you should add it. Even with an in-use cover, that would be better done inside (breaker panel or an earlier receptacle in the ...


22

The most important rule in NEC is 110.3(B), which requires you to follow labeling and instructions... which means read them. In this case, that only makes things better, particularly the boldface in 4a and 4b. These explain how to use Leviton's "back-wire" feature, which allows placing 2 wires under each screw. Pay heed to the word "FIRMLY&...


21

No nothing special that is a normally dry location as identified by code. All garage receptacles do require GFCI protection so either a GFCI breaker or GFCI receptacle is required. I would consider a WR (weather resistant) rated receptacle as they last longer in garage locations.


21

Trying to drill out the screws is not a workable solution for the type of electrical box shown in the picture. The plastic or composite material that the box is made of is much softer than the steel screws. Attempting to drill the screw, especially with a hand drill, will just lead to the drill bit skidding off the top of the screw and digging into the ...


21

You didn't specify the model number but this is likely similar (from: https://www.justanswer.com/appliance/7j73z-need-ge-stacked-washer-dryer-dryer-timer-motor-wiring-hookup.html) You'll note that the washer is powered from L-2/N and the dryer is powered from L-1/L-2. It's clear that you likely have a missing or bad N connection and using the 10/2 is ...


20

240 V is the "nominal" reading. You'll usually get ±10% voltage from the utility lines, and your appliances are designed to accommodate that variation.


20

That's illegal, and always was illegal You can't use 10/2 + ground cable for a washer-dryer. You never could. IN 1996 (25 years ago) they banned the NEMA 10-30 connector. Your combo unit can easily be wired NEMA 14 with a 4-prong plug, and the conversion instructions are in the manual. In 1966 (55 years ago) they effectively banned using 10/3 without ...


19

Did you shock yourself? Most likely not. The plastic handle of the scissors, though not rated or approved by any regulatory test lab for cutting live wires, is likely to have protected you. There's also a fair chance that your body wasn't in contact with any grounded conductor, so even if you did come in contact with the live wire, you would not have been ...


18

With an ordinary duplex receptacle (GFCI is a bit different), there are two ways it can be installed: Combined = tabs in place In this mode, the two hots are connected together and the two neutrals are connected together. Both receptacles are powered from the same source. If you want to power an additional receptacle (or lights or whatever) from the same ...


18

Welcome to the Magic 8-ball: Harper calls these the Magic 8-Ball because they sometimes produce meaningless, seemingly random, results. But for straightforward wire swaps they are exactly the tool to use. These testers make what you found out the hard way a bit easier - i.e., you can plug them into each 120V receptacle to very quickly find out what is going ...


18

That is a junction box, and must remain accessible (plastic or metal cover, cover can be painted.) NEC 314.29 If the wiring is completely removed, you can remove the junction box, but usually the wiring is serving some purpose and that is not practical.


18

Just to make it clear, in simple language, since some of the other answers are rather technical: The outlet is just a connector - it just lets you plug in cords to the electricity supply. It doesn't actually change the electricity supply. You still have 240V electricity going to this outlet, even though it's now a 120V outlet. The difference between a 240V ...


17

What Ed says. You are not grandfathered on GFCI protection since this is a circuit extension. You need it. NEC does not require a GFCI receptacle. The difference between "protection" and "receptacle" is very important here. A GFCI device can protect any circuit extension beyond that point. E.g. a GFCI breaker protects the whole circuit....


15

You'll want to turn off the breaker. You should be alright but if the internals of the outlet are damaged or broken, you don't want to come in contact with them when you pull out the ground plug. You might even want to replace the outlet since the grounding terminal shouldn't just break off under normal use, unless the extension cord was really damaged.


14

A nema 6 outlet has two hots and a ground, it is used for pure 240V equipment. A nema 14 outlet has two hots, a ground and a neutral. It is used for equipment that has both 120V and 240V components. A nema 10 outlet nominally has two hots and a neutral but no ground. However in practice the neutral pin is used as a combined neutral and ground conductor. Nema ...


14

Well, first, you can't do work in a rental property without 2 things. Landlord's permission to do the work AND Local government permission to do the work, which will only happen if the work is a) trivial or b) done by a licensed electrician. That's the law. "But this is such a minor thing. Why all the fuss?" Oh, nothing minor about this! Dryer ...


13

The tall one is neutral, and should be near ground. Of course, Neutral Is Not Ground :) It's possible the outlet is miswired. It's also possible that it suffered a neutral wire break somewhere between here and the panel. Ground is ground, hot is hot, as intended... but neutral is floating. In actuality it's being pulled up to hot voltage because a load ...


13

Play it safe. Replace the receptacle. What else can you get these days for 71 cents? $1.24 if you get tamper-resistant (which nobody likes but you're supposed to use in many places now) and $2.18 for commercial-grade instead of residential-grade (electrically the same but built a bit better).


13

I don’t use back stabs and although code allows them this is by far the largest cause of failed wiring in my experience (worse than aluminum wiring). Since I don’t see a release I would NOT reuse because if the worst happens and the stranded wires start backing out they may contact the transformer or grounded box. It would be a good idea to pigtail the Hots ...


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