76

It's for a plug in clock. You hang the clock on the little hook, and the receptacle is backset so the plug does not interfere with the clock sitting flush against the wall.


13

Those outlet boxes are the Leviton Cheetah line of “quick install” boxes. The outlets and covers just push into place when first installing, but as you have discovered, the plastic inserts can break over time or when you try to remove and reinstall the outlets. Cheetah box inserts You can buy replacement inserts. I would shop around. That Amazon listing ...


6

A feeder is breaker and wiring that supplies a subpanel. A branch circuit is breaker and wiring that supplies various outlets, including receptacle outlets. "Outlets" does include hardwired loads, or as they like to call them, "utilization equipment". Wiring can be one or the other, not both. You cannot have outlets on a feeder. So no. ...


6

In general, there are two ways of running cables. During construction or major remodeling - When cables are installed while walls are open, they are often secured in some fashion to studs and other parts of the building. This is required for electrical wiring. This is optional (generally) for low voltage wiring, but often done in order to keep the cables ...


5

Generally you speaking, you can't do that. There may be some very specific exceptions relating to a receptacle with a cooktop/stove/oven, but you would need a specific exception to allow it. If the question were: How do I replace a 50A circuit with 6 AWG wire with a 15A or 20A circuit and matching receptacles, the answer is to use wire nuts to connect the 6 ...


4

As long as the donor is large enough, you're fine Your proposal works under NEC 250.130(C) as long as the donor circuit's grounding wire (EGC) is as large or larger than the required grounding conductor size for the recipient. (In other words: larger circuits can donate to smaller ones, but smaller circuits can't donate to larger ones, at least when dealing ...


3

First of all, a dryer receptacle is rated 30 amps, not 40, so if it's on a 40 amp breaker, you're already in violation. If you truly have a 40 amp circuit (#8 copper wire minimum) the you're ok for the wires being on a 40 amp breaker but not the receptacle. If you have #10 copper on a 40 amp breaker then you are overfused. Either way, there is nothing wrong ...


3

Your plan is perfectly fine - basically retrofit ground via any reasonable route (bare or green wire, totally new or connecting to an existing grounded location). But there is another alternative, which can actually be better in some ways: GFCI A GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter) is required in certain locations - kitchen (with some very specific ...


3

You can't have a 5-15 receptacle on a 50A breaker. (not on a 30A breaker either). So, reuse of that wire run will require changing the breaker to an appropriate value e.g. 15A (or 20A due to the exception that allows 15A receptacles on 20A circuits). Breakers are $10. To attach a #6 wire to a receptacle you will need to pigtail using either really large ...


2

You are going to have to figure out how to keep the foam out of the boxes. Once it cures you are fine. You will have to use the low expanding stuff and keep it from entering the back tabs. The fronts we saran wrap and rubber band. The back tabs are not easy to block. I don't really understand the logistics you have going on here too... You have the ...


1

You can safely remove the switch, bond the switched wires together, and cover the junction box, so that you have unswitched wires for the GB receptacle. Adding a countertop receptacle to the GB circuit would be a violation of NEC 210.52(B)(2).


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