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10

They make root cutters for cutting plant roots that have grown through pipes, but they are made to cut roots, not steel. I'm not aware of anything that is specifically designed for this. Maybe you could get a steel cutting blade made for a root cutter. You would then still have to get the pipe lined afterwards to seal the holes. This would be a pretty ...


4

You could cut a notch (like 1/4 pipe depth) in the pipe and just wrap the wire around the pipe, tucking it into the notch.


4

Concrete does not have very good tensile strength. Rebar is laid in such a manner that it adds tensile strength in the concrete. Depending on the size and weight load the pier/footer assembly is expected to support and the length of the pier, it could be reinforced in the following manner. A rebar circle in the footer to prevent weight spread from cracking ...


4

It has always been "tie wire". Just do a search, that is all you will come up with.


4

While you might be able to find a specialty coring outfit that can cut the rebar without damaging the pipe, I suspect that their cost is going to be higher than just busting out the floor/ digging around the pipe/ removing the rebar/ sleeving the pipe to repair/ filling and patching. Unless you can pin this on someone with insurance, I'm afraid you're on ...


4

Best way to find out is to ask a concrete contractor. One potential problem with doing what you're suggesting is that there probably won't be a workmanship/cracking warranty, as the concrete guys may not "approve" of the stone & rebar work you would do.


4

Bore a 4" hole and pour it full of concrete, so the rebar has 2" concrete cover.


3

Do not cut the rebar in the concrete ceiling slab. Rebar is placed in concrete slabs (and beams) for tension. Cutting the rebar eliminates the resistance to tensile stress and could cause immediate failure (collapse of the slab).


3

A Dremel Tool with a cut off wheel is going to be your tool of choice here. Here is a picture of what that looks like: When approaching a job like this I make sure I have plenty of the cutoff wheels. I also have a half dozen of the mandrels so that I can have all of them with cutoff wheels premounted so it is quick change in the tool when one wears down or ...


3

Been there , done that. If you do it yourself ,it is the price of a few yards of concrete ; the truck must be able the reach the forms. Three guys can finish it easily ( I did it with my wife-mistake, but it got done). The forms must be well braced because the wet concrete puts pressure on them.Because it was a patio, I did not use rebar .I did put in mesh ,...


2

I'm not sure what your level of expertise is, but it's important to note that footings and piers are two different things (no offense intended). Usually for a deck piers will suffice on their own, provided they are wide enough (typically 12" is good) and deep enough to go below the frostline in your area (3 ft deep is a good rule of thumb). The main reason ...


2

I have been working with and around concrete for 20 years now. One thing is you cannot put cmu block or any other stucture on just a thin concrete pad. You must have a load bearing surface (footer) , and the specs will vary depending on soil type, frost line, and load. Second, if you wanted to dowel in to concrete you must use epoxy to anchor them. If using #...


2

You're asking 3 questions, so I'll address them separately. In the future, please ask one question per post. There's no reason other than aesthetics and strength that you should extend the slab below grade. Since your step will be 6" thick, strength is not an issue. Use inexpensive substrate rather than making your slab 10" thick. As far as substrate ...


2

Yes, you should add rebar across the joint between to old and new block wall. Do this by using a masonry drill (preferably a hammer drill) and drill 3-6" vertically down into the existing block wall top where the hole / rebar dowel will not be in the way of adding the next row of block. Best to use 1/2" or #4 rebar for this purpose and use the same size ...


2

What you need is an oscillating saw, also called a "multitool" and maybe some other trademarked names. They vibrate back and forth very fast but don't move a lot and are perfect for narrow spaces like that. In the linked article below, look at photo #5 to give you an idea. https://www.popularmechanics.com/home/interior-projects/how-to/g830/10-jobs-you-can-...


2

Repair of collapsed or corroded cast iron sewer pipe under concrete slabs is done where I live by either cutting through the slab or by tunneling under the slab.


2

Whether your concrete base will survive is irrelevant, because your beam will fail. See: https://www.amesweb.info/StructuralAnalysisBeams/Stresses_Steel_Hollow_Structural_Sections.aspx Input: Output: Notice the highlighted field of the output. That's the stress you'll be putting on the connection with the ground, (assuming it's rigid). The yield ...


2

How much concrete slumps is directly related to how much water is used to mix it. Interestingly, (within reason) drier mixes are also stronger than wetter mixes, all else being equal. Most people mix too wet by default. I'd firmly suggest some experimentation (by which I mean not "try to do a section" but to actually build a short test piece that you will ...


2

Cutting the re-bar so you can complete your 4 inch hole could cause your foundation to crack. I suspect that you already know that or else you would not be asking this question. The problem here is that there is no way to provide any answer regarding assurance that cutting the re-bar would not be harmful to your foundation. There are just to many unknown ...


2

Seems like the biggest problem here is lack of a railing -- 14 feet is a long way to fall! I'd do nothing to treat the cut. There will be water exposure from rain or irrigation but at least there's not likely to be any road salt that would accelerate corrosion. Further, if corrosion does get into the wall, the stakes are relatively low. This isn't a bridge ...


2

Coat it with a concrete epoxy paint (and grit, for traction, since it's a step.)


2

Your intentions aren't entirely clear, but here are some general ideas: U-bolt clamps through holes in the sheet and around the bar Hose clamps through slots in the sheet and around the bar Wire through holes in the sheet and around the bar A friend with a welder (though the dissimilar metals make this challenging) Bolts through the rebar and the sheet ...


2

Bury the blocks far enough into the ground so the rebar isn't doing most of the work. Or, use corrosion resistant rebar. https://handymansworld.net/types-of-rebar/


2

For rebar applications near sea coasts where corrosion is a problem ; coatings like fusion bonded epoxies are used. Also , more costly ,stainless rebar. If you are in a coastal location in certain parts of the world ,these products may be available.


1

Really there's no need the footings will not see any tensile or flexing loads. Be sure to tie the posts into the footing. That's all that's needed. if the post is being embedded in the concrete you could pass some bar through it (drill a hole).


1

You could try cutting it out with a diamond wire saw. I have seen them slice right through tower block pillars (concrete and rebar). If you could loop the wire over the rebar and keep it flush to the side of the pipe it would cut though easily. There are hand saws available (basically just a diamond coated wire with loops on each end). The other option ...


1

Use an oscillating tool with a blade for metal. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6VJzEF0j0VA


1

I think a hole saw will do what you need, the problem is you don't have material to drill the pilot bit into to keep the hole saw on center. There is a trick that should work here. You put two hole saws on the same arbor at the same time. The inner hole saw is the diameter of the hole in the sheet aluminum. The outer hole saw is half an inch larger. ...


1

A bare hack saw blade will do it, with work. Hold the blade with vice-grips; I have had to resort to this technique for automotive work. Rebar tends to harder than ordinary cold rolled, possibly up to twice the strength but a hack saw will still cut it.


1

You'll be the judge of whether it's appropriate to grind the pvc (it's bound to be easier), but if you have to cut the rebar, my mind goes to a die grinder/ (small d) dremel type tool with a small cut off wheel. For a very small job like this, you might even just chuck a cutoff wheel+arbor in a drill. (Just know that drills aren't really designed for ...


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