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10

They make root cutters for cutting plant roots that have grown through pipes, but they are made to cut roots, not steel. I'm not aware of anything that is specifically designed for this. Maybe you could get a steel cutting blade made for a root cutter. You would then still have to get the pipe lined afterwards to seal the holes. This would be a pretty ...


4

While you might be able to find a specialty coring outfit that can cut the rebar without damaging the pipe, I suspect that their cost is going to be higher than just busting out the floor/ digging around the pipe/ removing the rebar/ sleeving the pipe to repair/ filling and patching. Unless you can pin this on someone with insurance, I'm afraid you're on ...


4

You could cut a notch (like 1/4 pipe depth) in the pipe and just wrap the wire around the pipe, tucking it into the notch.


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Concrete does not have very good tensile strength. Rebar is laid in such a manner that it adds tensile strength in the concrete. Depending on the size and weight load the pier/footer assembly is expected to support and the length of the pier, it could be reinforced in the following manner. A rebar circle in the footer to prevent weight spread from cracking ...


4

It has always been "tie wire". Just do a search, that is all you will come up with.


3

A Dremel Tool with a cut off wheel is going to be your tool of choice here. Here is a picture of what that looks like: When approaching a job like this I make sure I have plenty of the cutoff wheels. I also have a half dozen of the mandrels so that I can have all of them with cutoff wheels premounted so it is quick change in the tool when one wears down or ...


2

I'm not sure what your level of expertise is, but it's important to note that footings and piers are two different things (no offense intended). Usually for a deck piers will suffice on their own, provided they are wide enough (typically 12" is good) and deep enough to go below the frostline in your area (3 ft deep is a good rule of thumb). The main reason ...


2

I have been working with and around concrete for 20 years now. One thing is you cannot put cmu block or any other stucture on just a thin concrete pad. You must have a load bearing surface (footer) , and the specs will vary depending on soil type, frost line, and load. Second, if you wanted to dowel in to concrete you must use epoxy to anchor them. If using #...


2

You're asking 3 questions, so I'll address them separately. In the future, please ask one question per post. There's no reason other than aesthetics and strength that you should extend the slab below grade. Since your step will be 6" thick, strength is not an issue. Use inexpensive substrate rather than making your slab 10" thick. As far as substrate ...


2

Yes, you should add rebar across the joint between to old and new block wall. Do this by using a masonry drill (preferably a hammer drill) and drill 3-6" vertically down into the existing block wall top where the hole / rebar dowel will not be in the way of adding the next row of block. Best to use 1/2" or #4 rebar for this purpose and use the same size ...


2

How much concrete slumps is directly related to how much water is used to mix it. Interestingly, (within reason) drier mixes are also stronger than wetter mixes, all else being equal. Most people mix too wet by default. I'd firmly suggest some experimentation (by which I mean not "try to do a section" but to actually build a short test piece that you will ...


2

What you need is an oscillating saw, also called a "multitool" and maybe some other trademarked names. They vibrate back and forth very fast but don't move a lot and are perfect for narrow spaces like that. In the linked article below, look at photo #5 to give you an idea. https://www.popularmechanics.com/home/interior-projects/how-to/g830/10-jobs-you-can-...


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Do not cut the rebar in the concrete ceiling slab. Rebar is placed in concrete slabs (and beams) for tension. Cutting the rebar eliminates the resistance to tensile stress and could cause immediate failure (collapse of the slab).


2

Repair of collapsed or corroded cast iron sewer pipe under concrete slabs is done where I live by either cutting through the slab or by tunneling under the slab.


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Whether your concrete base will survive is irrelevant, because your beam will fail. See: https://www.amesweb.info/StructuralAnalysisBeams/Stresses_Steel_Hollow_Structural_Sections.aspx Input: Output: Notice the highlighted field of the output. That's the stress you'll be putting on the connection with the ground, (assuming it's rigid). The yield ...


1

You could try cutting it out with a diamond wire saw. I have seen them slice right through tower block pillars (concrete and rebar). If you could loop the wire over the rebar and keep it flush to the side of the pipe it would cut though easily. There are hand saws available (basically just a diamond coated wire with loops on each end). The other option ...


1

Use an oscillating tool with a blade for metal. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6VJzEF0j0VA


1

I think a hole saw will do what you need, the problem is you don't have material to drill the pilot bit into to keep the hole saw on center. There is a trick that should work here. You put two hole saws on the same arbor at the same time. The inner hole saw is the diameter of the hole in the sheet aluminum. The outer hole saw is half an inch larger. ...


1

A bare hack saw blade will do it, with work. Hold the blade with vice-grips; I have had to resort to this technique for automotive work. Rebar tends to harder than ordinary cold rolled, possibly up to twice the strength but a hack saw will still cut it.


1

You'll be the judge of whether it's appropriate to grind the pvc (it's bound to be easier), but if you have to cut the rebar, my mind goes to a die grinder/ (small d) dremel type tool with a small cut off wheel. For a very small job like this, you might even just chuck a cutoff wheel+arbor in a drill. (Just know that drills aren't really designed for ...


1

Keep the rebar 3”” from the bottom of the footing and 3” from the edge of the footing. I’d install the #4 bars 8” oc each way. (You’re not concerned with flexural bending of the footing, because the column on the footing is so large 24”x24”). I would run 4 - #4 rebar vertically in the column and install 4” hook (90 degree bend) in each rebar and extend ...


1

One of the 1/2” rebar “you have access to” has enough “shear strength” to support my car full of groceries with me in it. However, you don’t want to use it for a horizontal support of grape vines, because it will rust and deposit so much rust in your vineyard that you’ll be labeled a hazardous waste site. Also, that rust will contaminate the taste and ...


1

Most inspectors will allow 3" dobbies, but really you should use 3" chairs to keep the rebar 3" clear off the bottom and sides. (The reason your engineer specified 3" is because of moisture protection and chairs allows less moisture than dobbies.) I'd wire the steel in place at the top using a wood frame cage set 3" in on the sides and wire the cage to ...


1

Depending on the size, you could see about renting a demolition hammer and a ground rod drive bit. You might also want to bevel the tip of the rod, so it's not just a blunt end.


1

Historically rebar has had high carbon so so very likely to crack if welded. Modern rebar is lower carbon but is not intended to be welded. Depending on the composition of the rebar you have a fair chance of no cracks in the weld zone. I would stay with the traditional wire joint.


1

Your local farm supply will have fiberglass stakes and spring clip insulators for this. For rabbits, the stakes may be too long at 4' so cut them in half to double your stake count.


1

A rotary hammer is the standard tool for a job like this, with a carbide-tipped masonry bit. You can rent a heavy-duty model at your local rental center. They're not difficult to use. Be sure to wear ear, eye, and resipration protection. As for your question about depth, you haven't provided nearly enough information about your plans for anyone to speculate....


1

Just two things: Don't use vertical rebars - the part not covered by the alkaline concrete will corrode and gradually crack the concrete. Instead, use plastic or concrete spacers to place the horizontal rebar at the desired height. It should be enclosed by concrete all around. Try to compact the concrete in order to get all air out. After that, slumping ...


1

It sounds like your 1" pads may be non-shrink grout. If it is different in texture and color, it should pop off the concrete, and yes grind off the metal bar with a thin cutting wheel on a small right angle grinder. If the surface is to be part of the finished job, I would consider chiseling down around the pin with a neat hole or use a core drill, to cut it ...


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