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109

Stop, turn off the gas, ventilate the house, and hire a pro. If you applied teflon tape to a flare fitting, you are NOT the person to be installing your gas range. You fundamentally don't understand what you are doing, and doing this wrong can blow up your house. That tends to impair the "learn from your mistakes" method of learning. This is not the place ...


25

Repeating the comments : Do NOT use any pipe dope or tape on flare connections . They are metal to metal seals and anything on the metal sealing surface can cause a leak. Pipe threads (tapered) require dope/tape to get a good seal. I analysed a house fire once and the primary cause was a leak caused by dope on a flare fitting.


23

For an old installation, there are some "shortcuts" grandfathered in, but even those are based on "no ground but have a neutral". You have the opposite - and much worse - problem of "no neutral but have a ground". Rip out the 8/2 and put 8/3 in place. That will give you two hots (typically black & red), neutral (white) and ground (bare or green). ...


9

You can't do that. That's been outlawed since 1989. You need to redo the circuit using 8/3 cable (or 6/3 if you aim to breaker it for 50A). You need to wire a separate neutral/ground and bring it into a NEMA 14-50 receptacle (if you use receptacles, that's not required). You also need to jumper the oven for a 4-wire connection, which means removing a ...


6

Everyone else is right. It’s supposed to be a metal-metal seal, so tape won’t do anything. Glue or caulking would not fix it, and trying to welding it or solder it won’t end nicely. Basically, Either the seal or a thread is damaged and you should get a professional to fix it. If not, your leak could not only destroy your home and possibly your neighbor’s ...


5

As others have indicated, there is a very real danger that you have damaged the fitting in an attempt to fix it. Further attempts to fix it can cause things to get worse. And you can solve the immediate problem, but have it corrode or fail over time. Even if you live in an area where you don't have to have a license to work on the gas connection, there ...


4

IME, Most electric stoves rely on duty cycles to adjust the heat of a burner. They do not alter the "flow" of heat like a gas stove. The burner is either producing heat, or it is not. If you watch it long enough, I bet you could even time the patterns of the different temperature settings. I would call the manufacturer and see if there are any known issues, ...


4

More than 20 feet of flex pipe is a problem - 20 feet of flex pipe, uninsulated, sloped so it drains back into the fan is a huge problem. Flex pipe has VERY high resistance to airflow compared with smooth duct. It should be avoided, or if its absolutely unavoidable it should only be used for very short sections where regular fittings will not work. I don't ...


4

Different electrical systems, same range On the far right, do you see where it says "208Y/120V" in the first row and "120/240V" in the second row? Most electric cooking appliances are designed to run off of two different voltage systems, yours included, and that is why they have two ratings. Figuring out what you have The easiest way to figure out which ...


3

You know those coils are cheap, consumable, field-replaceable items. It's common for departing tenants to replace drip pans and coils that are too dirty to clean easily. The coil may have lost some of its insulation and developed a short to chassis. But generally they are not valuable enough to ask "why".


3

In my experience, most spark ignition ranges spark all the burners at the same time. So, it's probably just an issue with that burner not sparking - spark gap shorted out with food is the usual cause. Broken wire is possible but much less likely. Try looking at the left front burner spark (which you see when trying to light the front right) while lighting ...


3

My background is Industrial, Commercial, & Residential combustion & appliances. I often also consult to Commercial & Residential Cooking Equipment OEMs. The noise you are most likely hearing is a high-pitched hum, caused by turbulent flow in some pipe fitting. Most frequently, the source is an undersized or too lengthy flexible pipe fitting. ...


3

Range hood vented to outdoors. Overlay heat resistant materials over cabinet, CBU/porcelain tile or CBU/stainless steel sheeting CBU = Cement Backer Unit AKA Cement Backer Board


3

Never seen one like this - BUT have installed many a hood in cabinets where the vent did not end up exiting the center of the cabinet. a combination of adjustable elbows will offset the vent if you have at least 15" height in the cabinet. As a last resort flexible aluminum duct could be used but only if you have no other options.


3

Your condo violates Code and is unsafe, and your HOA consists of idiots First off -- your condo's existing setup, with a recirculating hood over a domestic gas appliance, is quite clearly a Code violation and a flagrant safety hazard, as IFGC 503.3 strictly prohibits the recirculation of gas appliance exhaust due to the unacceptable CO buildup that would ...


3

Sounds like this is still under warranty. Contact the manufacturer; the info should be in the user's manual.


3

For now, your bare wire's a neutral Your oven branch circuit appears to have been run using a type SE cable -- this was common practice in the 50's as heavy gauge NM was not available at that time. As the NEMA 10 is an ungrounded outlet with 2 hots and 1 neutral, the bare wire in your type SE cable lands to the subpanel's neutral bar.


3

Your panel needs to be reviewed, carefully. When you do, you'll have no trouble finding 2 spaces. It's a quality CH panel, albeit with only 20 spaces. I'm not counting the top 2 spaces in each row, which collectively are the main breaker (100A). Good news is, with this panel arrangement, if you shut off the main breaker, everything is cold except those ...


3

Cooking appliances are a bit weird The NEC treats household electric cooking appliances (ranges, cooktops, ovens) somewhat differently due to their rather uneven loads. This starts in section and table 220.55 of the NEC, which applies an 80% demand factor to the load of a single household cooking appliance rated not more than 8.75kW. As a result, your ...


3

Regardless, put the tank outside. Plumb the house like you would for a huge tank, just bring it to an appropriate enclosure. Put your swappable tank there. Gas pressure is determined by the temperature of the fuel in the tank, mainly the liquid fuel since it has almost all the mass. Large or small tank makes no difference. Piece of bad news though....


3

It is allowable and you would not need to make it water-tight, however, there are neater ways to finish this job. If anything below seems too overwhelming, call an electrician. Since you're going to cut the conduit, you'll want to locate the next junction box and pull your wires back from there before you cut. When you use a sawzall or conduit cutter, you ...


3

A 14-50 receptacle can be a 40A or 50A circuit (i.e. that fuse/breaker). If wired with 8 AWG cable, it can only be 40A. The reason for this exception is 40A receptacles don't exist, because this chart is big enough already! If you have a new stove that comes factory-wired with a 14-50, then they sold you an electric stove. Edit: That's what you have. ...


3

It isn't normal, and any gas in the room should dissipate fairly quickly. Get yourself a cup of soapy water and a paint brush and find the leak. At the very least your house will smell bad. At worst....


3

If you have 3 wires coming from the wall (hot hot neutral, no ground), then you hook the wires to the 3 terminals that you see. Note the odd little strap linking the neutral stud to the chassis of the range. It is "grounded" to neutral. Any fault with the neutral wire will energize the chassis at one of the hot voltages. Yikes. If you have 4 wires ...


3

The appliance installers are not electricians. They are refusing to install only because it's not what they're used to, and they don't know why it's different. They gave you bad instructions: You cannot install a 50A range socket on this circuit. It is illegal to do that because socket sizes must match the circuit/breaker size. Even if the wiring in ...


3

I understand your confusion and also agree with ever ones answers to date, but I want to try an clear up the some of the confusion. Electricians are not really trained to recognize "dryer" and "range" circuits. In brief they are trained to calculate circuits for dryers at 5000W and ranges at 8000W in normal construction of a dwelling. This is done to allow ...


3

If you are installing tile then just wait to use the back burners on high until that is done. Any type of tile should be an adequate fire barrier for a stove top. If you have to have something in the interim then I suggest taping up some aluminum foil or if you want to get semi-permanent some fire retardant paint.


3

My KitchenAid (just took it apart for cleaning, so this is fresh in my mind) looks nearly identical (except the oval burner - but instead it has a 2-section round burner) with the empty section underneath, metal part with teeth on top and burner cap on top. Without everything in place you get sparks & gas but not ignition. When I got my current cooktop ...


2

That diameter would be very close to a M2.5 at 1.993mm minor screw. A hex head cap screw (AKA Allen head) could replace the Phillips. Its also a bit smaller than an ANSI #4-40 at .0805inch minor You could try the approximate size and get the matching tap for the closest interference fit.


2

The oven control problem could be either the temperature sensor or the thermostat. In the case of the temp sensor the heat control system looking for an input from the sensor to indicate that the oven is heating up will never get that indication from a broken sensor. It will thus keep heating away with continued hope to get a reaction out of the temp ...


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