Hot answers tagged

108

Stop, turn off the gas, ventilate the house, and hire a pro. If you applied teflon tape to a flare fitting, you are NOT the person to be installing your gas range. You fundamentally don't understand what you are doing, and doing this wrong can blow up your house. That tends to impair the "learn from your mistakes" method of learning. This is not the place ...


57

It's much more difficult for a small child to "play with the controls" and turn the stove elements on in that location. Having lived with stoves like this for a long time, I've never burned myself reaching for them.


27

I'm not certain what guage that wire is but many manufacturers will cite a minimum bend radius. It may or may not be code compliance wherever you are in the world. I suspect that wire has a minimum bend radius between 1 and 2 inches. You can achieve that most easily by just rotating the receptacle. The wire will tail upwards, which will look strange, but it ...


25

Repeating the comments : Do NOT use any pipe dope or tape on flare connections . They are metal to metal seals and anything on the metal sealing surface can cause a leak. Pipe threads (tapered) require dope/tape to get a good seal. I analysed a house fire once and the primary cause was a leak caused by dope on a flare fitting.


23

For an old installation, there are some "shortcuts" grandfathered in, but even those are based on "no ground but have a neutral". You have the opposite - and much worse - problem of "no neutral but have a ground". Rip out the 8/2 and put 8/3 in place. That will give you two hots (typically black & red), neutral (white) and ground (bare or green). ...


11

It’s an old or perhaps a better word is classic design - there are some advantages like if you spill something it won’t go all over the controls. However disadvantages include having to reach over a spitting or steaming pan but it is always down to what you learned on or are used to.


11

I'd take a third option here. You clearly have a place to store fuel and someplace where you can run it so I would suggest a propane tank and stove. Cheap, very long shelf life so long as it's stored shielded from water. (The propane lasts forever, the tank can rust. Note that the tank has a 12 year expiry date--you won't be able to refill it after that, ...


10

In addition to the useful comments already posted, the design prevents accidental turn ons due to leaning up against the stove to stir a pot, etc.


10

Nope, no good. The right thing to do in this situation is not to just omit the equipment ground wire from the four-wire receptacle as if it was optional. It will operate, but it will not be code compliant, and it won't be as safe as it could or should be. That wire is after all the safety ground. If you aren't prepared to run a ground wire for the circuit, ...


9

You can't do that. That's been outlawed since 1989. You need to redo the circuit using 8/3 cable (or 6/3 if you aim to breaker it for 50A). You need to wire a separate neutral/ground and bring it into a NEMA 14-50 receptacle (if you use receptacles, that's not required). You also need to jumper the oven for a 4-wire connection, which means removing a ...


9

The biggest issue you have venting into the attic is warm, moist air being blown into a somewhat closed area (aside from the grease and particles you have a filter for). If the attic space you vent into is large, and has good ventilation this shouldn't be an issue. If you have to vent into a small portion of the attic and it looks like the moist air will ...


8

Generally yes can use part of your range. Each burner is different, I've seen 8" burners use up to 2500 watts, smaller can be 1200 to 1500. I have even baked a pie. However I had to trick the oven by preheating on the broil setting since preheating on the bake setting uses both top and bottom elements and my biggest generator is a 5500.


7

I found a video explaining that it's fine to hook the new 14-50r without a ground (just connect the 2 hot and 1 neutral) so I did that. I turned it on and everything appears to be working great. Did this video include the words "challenge" or "hold my beer"? It should have... yes, Youtube is horrible for electrical advice. Come here; ...


6

Everyone else is right. It’s supposed to be a metal-metal seal, so tape won’t do anything. Glue or caulking would not fix it, and trying to welding it or solder it won’t end nicely. Basically, Either the seal or a thread is damaged and you should get a professional to fix it. If not, your leak could not only destroy your home and possibly your neighbor’s ...


6

Yes it should be in a junction box. It can be hard wired but that takes a cover plate and a strain relief. This is uncommon at least in my code area. The common method is at minimum 3 wires 2 hot and a ground (I don’t see a ground) . I see the neutral wire cut off on the cord side. The modern method is to provide all 4 wires 2 hot 1 neutral and a grounded ...


5

As others have indicated, there is a very real danger that you have damaged the fitting in an attempt to fix it. Further attempts to fix it can cause things to get worse. And you can solve the immediate problem, but have it corrode or fail over time. Even if you live in an area where you don't have to have a license to work on the gas connection, there ...


5

Aside from the major parental control feature, already mentioned, this allows the oven door to extend all the way up, granting a more spacious oven chamber opening for inserting taller things if needed. Probably too minor to make enough of a difference to most, but sure does look more "dedicated" and potentially a selling feature to some.


5

That is a very common fault for a heating element. Check and see if the stove top works, the fault may not have tripped the breaker. Most older homes have a 40 amp circuit double pole for a range and 50 amp is becoming more popular. (If in another part of the world a different size breaker is possible) A 120v oven doubtful 120v GFCI very doubtful with older ...


4

IME, Most electric stoves rely on duty cycles to adjust the heat of a burner. They do not alter the "flow" of heat like a gas stove. The burner is either producing heat, or it is not. If you watch it long enough, I bet you could even time the patterns of the different temperature settings. I would call the manufacturer and see if there are any known issues, ...


4

More than 20 feet of flex pipe is a problem - 20 feet of flex pipe, uninsulated, sloped so it drains back into the fan is a huge problem. Flex pipe has VERY high resistance to airflow compared with smooth duct. It should be avoided, or if its absolutely unavoidable it should only be used for very short sections where regular fittings will not work. I don't ...


4

Different electrical systems, same range On the far right, do you see where it says "208Y/120V" in the first row and "120/240V" in the second row? Most electric cooking appliances are designed to run off of two different voltage systems, yours included, and that is why they have two ratings. Figuring out what you have The easiest way to figure out which ...


4

In my humble opinion, it isn't a good or safe idea to try and fix them. The bi-metal that controls the heat range of the burner is more than likely fatigued and can't be replaced. The switches are bracketed together in such a way that they are not meant to be taken apart and if you do, it's hard to get them securely put back together. Even if you could ...


4

I would seriously rethink this. Electric stoves are wonderful. But they use a lot (relatively speaking) of power. Unless you expect long term outages, a far better solution is to get a cheap 120V 15A microwave oven. It will draw 1500 W or so when running but that will let you run lights, refrigerator, etc. at the same time. For a day without power, reheating ...


4

TL;DR Hard wire it From the manual: This appliance should be connected by means of permanent "hard wiring" or by means of a power supply cord kit. Install a decent size metal junction box (i.e., might as well make it large enough for a future 14-50 and/or 6 AWG wiring, etc. should it ever be needed) on the wall. Use appropriate 10 AWG cable (the ...


3

You know those coils are cheap, consumable, field-replaceable items. It's common for departing tenants to replace drip pans and coils that are too dirty to clean easily. The coil may have lost some of its insulation and developed a short to chassis. But generally they are not valuable enough to ask "why".


3

In my experience, most spark ignition ranges spark all the burners at the same time. So, it's probably just an issue with that burner not sparking - spark gap shorted out with food is the usual cause. Broken wire is possible but much less likely. Try looking at the left front burner spark (which you see when trying to light the front right) while lighting ...


3

My background is Industrial, Commercial, & Residential combustion & appliances. I often also consult to Commercial & Residential Cooking Equipment OEMs. The noise you are most likely hearing is a high-pitched hum, caused by turbulent flow in some pipe fitting. Most frequently, the source is an undersized or too lengthy flexible pipe fitting. ...


3

Range hood vented to outdoors. Overlay heat resistant materials over cabinet, CBU/porcelain tile or CBU/stainless steel sheeting CBU = Cement Backer Unit AKA Cement Backer Board


3

Never seen one like this - BUT have installed many a hood in cabinets where the vent did not end up exiting the center of the cabinet. a combination of adjustable elbows will offset the vent if you have at least 15" height in the cabinet. As a last resort flexible aluminum duct could be used but only if you have no other options.


3

Your condo violates Code and is unsafe, and your HOA consists of idiots First off -- your condo's existing setup, with a recirculating hood over a domestic gas appliance, is quite clearly a Code violation and a flagrant safety hazard, as IFGC 503.3 strictly prohibits the recirculation of gas appliance exhaust due to the unacceptable CO buildup that would ...


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