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84

This is a common mistake, which will lead to premature roof wear. What the installer should have done, was to install an A to B transition elbow, and continued down the roof with a section of down spout. Then used an A elbow to have the water dump directly into the lower gutter. It should end up similar to this Allowing the high volume of water to flow ...


34

It is doubtful the pH+ of rainwater anywhere, other than directly downwind of an erupting volcano, would be unsafe in terms of damaging plumbing fixtures or pipes. That said, there is concern in how the rainwater is stored. It must be kept so as not to be a breeding place for mosquitoes, toxic algae or other noxious critters, nor should the container cause ...


14

All PVC is subject to UV light degradation. PVC without UV protection will eventually suffer a loss of impact resistance. Your pipe will be whole, until impact at which it will shatter or crack instead of flex. Some PVC (PVC UVR) is UV resistant. The sunlight still damages the PVC pipe, but it is in a matrix of other chemicals that compete for the UV ...


13

This is caused by: poor roof design poor gutter installation Since it's not cheap to fix the roof, the solution is to fix the gutters. You simply need larger and/or repositioned gutters. The catch is if you also have heavy snow loads. In that case, you also need strong, well-installed gutters. :) In this case, since it's really only one spot, I'd probably ...


12

Yes, you can do this, but you must make sure that the supplies to the wc are separated from the rest of the supplies to the taps, showers etc. We planned this in the plumbing for our house so that we could easily separate the washing machine and 3 wc from the other items - plumber was not happy but we got what we wanted. That meant we only needed a simple ...


10

If you plan to use that collected water for drinking and cooking then you will need a proper filtration / treatment system... Ingesting diluted bird-droppings is not a good idea... So, a simple filter may not be enough, you may well need UV treatment, but you should consult the authorities for the standards in your location you are legislated to meet and ...


9

Could you turn the end of the downspout 45-90 degrees so the water exits across the roof slope, rather than down it? This would help distribute the downspout flow across more roof area. Not sure if that's a standard approach, but it seems quick and easy to try, and easy to undo if it doesn't work


9

Rainwater is regularly captured and used by rural domestic properties here in New Zealand for everything in a typical household - from drinking to flushing toilets, with minimal treatment. Its pretty much the norm for people in rural locations (if you are a few miles outside a built up area, you wont have mains water or sewerage) - capture rainfall runoff ...


8

Were it me, I'd consider a 'janky' looking roof much better than premature shingle failure due to overload. Run a section of downspout across your roof and dump it into the existing gutter, angled in the direction of flow, so that the water doesn't splash into the gutter at a 90 degree angle, but joins water already headed for the downspout.


6

I would look at seeing if you could use large size slider bolts. I used this type of device to provide the safety latch for a large hinged stairway I had built in my garage some 13 years ago. The stairway was raised and lowered via an electric winch and cable/pulley system but I added two of the slide bolts (one on each side) as a safety measure when the ...


5

You could try the gray colored Schedule 80 PVC pipe. This is a much heavier duty material that will stand up to being outdoors. It is recommended by manufacturers. such as U.S. Plastic Corp, that PVC pipe and fittings be painted after installation with a coat of white water based latex paint to provide for UV resistance. The UV light is what is part of the ...


5

No it is not safe. NEC requires all conductors to be installed in an appropriate enclosure or totally removed. I suppose I should give you NEC Article 110.3 for the reference that does not allow what your picture is showing. You might want to quote this to your property manager and contractor. Needless to say this is an unsafe situation and you might ...


4

Water will raise the grain of your nice, smooth decking, requiring a re-sand. Also, rain will soak into the wood, requiring a significant dry-time delay before sealing. Yes, you should tarp it.


4

What can a rainwater contain? Something that was either in the air or on the roof. Acids: sulfuric or nitric, coming from the air pollution. If the air is more or less safe to breath, water raining from it is acceptable for the purpouse intended in regard to the acidic content. Steel pipes may suffer some corrosion, but they are rarely used today. Plastic ...


3

I would suggest the opposite of wallyk. Instead of trying to back track the leak, which probably goes through sealed off areas, try to reproduce it. Dry it, then use a hose on different parts of the outside window, once you have identified what part of the window is admitting the water, look for any ingresses. You basically need to divide the possible areas ...


3

Where is the water damage relative to the exterior ground level? I note in the outside picture that there is significant slope to the ground - if the ground on the uphill and slope-side sides is not shaped to move water away from and around the house, it would be likely that there would be water damage on the lower parts of the walls from water flowing over ...


3

What you need is a set of gargoyles: Definition and Origin of Gargoyles and Grotesques Gargoyles came into gothic architecture in the early 13th century and are defined as "a waterspout, projecting from an upper part of a building or a roof gutter to throw water clear of walls or foundations." The origins of the word 'gargoyle' are derived from the old ...


3

The main risk I can think of is electrocution. Most likely the parts are not designed to get wet, exposed to sun, and/or extreme temperatures. GFCI will protect you if you get electrocuted and the voltage goes to the ground, but if you happen to get electrocuted in a way that continues through the wiring back to the neutral, there will be no voltage ...


3

All concrete sets up under water. http://www.cement.org/cement-concrete-basics/faqs The only thing that will be impacted is the finish. If the top was not covered then the concrete will take on a bumpy appearance as the finer material may wash away and expose the aggregate.


3

People who have GFCI trips are way too quick to blame the detector rather than consider it may be doing its job. Rain is very consistent with a genuine ground fault. Since NM cable jacket is at least modestly effective at excluding water, you should check each of your junction boxes on the circuit for water ingress. Not because of a two-bit electrical ...


3

Some possibilities come to mind : Louvered panels, slatted panels, slatted ventilation panels. A google search for the text below gave many from 4" by 4" to fencing and all types in between. slatted ventilation panels


3

The new house I bought has some of these, so I've done some checking on how they work and how to keep them in repair. The most important things are to keep the vertical part that attaches to the downspout sealed, and clean out the emitter side as necessary or keep the gutter and downspout from getting leaves and seeds that will clog the downspout or tubes. ...


3

I've had this happen during heavy rain on all my downspouts that feed into underground pipes that emit in the yard several feet from the house. In my case, the pipes were not clogged and where some of the pipes comes out of the ground is actually 6 feet higher than the exit points. I personally installed all the pipes and remove emitters on my house. Some ...


3

Yes, you're going to want to run either a direct-burial cable or a conduit in a trench from your home to the pond. You'll also want to pull a permit for this work even if you plan to do it yourself and be sure you understand the code requirements in your location so that you don't make an expensive mistake and have to pull it out and re-do the work.


3

The extension cable or almost any method would be fine if you made sure the circuit has GFCI protection. Now, GFCI isn't just a different style of receptacle. It is actually a zone of protection. Obviously, it protects things plugged into the plugs (including extension cords), but it also protects any downline wiring that is attached to the GFCI's "...


3

There are situations where water pooling on a flat roof is a problem, but this probably isn't one of them. The cases where it's a problem are where water pools, the weight of the water deforms the roof structure, so more water pools, so the roof deforms more and collapse results. You appear to have a relatively small area of poorly graded surface near the ...


2

I had a similar problem and added a length of corrugated tubing to my existing downspouts. What was happening is that the water came down the downspouts too close to the house. It did not have time to soak into the ground and pooled around the foundation. So using some black corrugated pipe and the right adapters got that water 5-10 feet from the house. ...


2

This is a stunningly bad idea, IMHO. As @Comintern notes, that's a rather significant load to plop beside your house. Far simpler and safer to run your downspouts over to where your sump pump discharges, and put a basin & pump there that pumps water uphill, to your storage tanks, set somewhere uphill, so they will provide water pressure when you are ...


2

It seems like the easiest solution would be to just put up a gutter and then move the lower ladder to one of the other walls, no?


2

First off, your friend should definitely talk to his landlord about the flooding. Even if the landlord won't address it, it's possible your friend could be held liable for water damage from the flooding if he doesn't notify the landlord. There are two big differences between the pump you need here and a normal sump pump. The first is that it won't be run ...


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