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80

This is a common mistake, which will lead to premature roof wear. What the installer should have done, was to install an A to B transition elbow, and continued down the roof with a section of down spout. Then used an A elbow to have the water dump directly into the lower gutter. It should end up similar to this Allowing the high volume of water to flow ...


20

It turns out people have consumed rainwater for millions of years. So there's some precedent. This is very well covered online, so grab a search engine and get reading. Here's a summary of concerns. In the US, it may be illegal (look up "water rights") but for individual home use, that is usually ignored. You'll get a lot of water from your roof really ...


15

As I mentioned in a comment to Jay's post, rainwater collecting may be illegal, dependent on your State. Western states, which get less rain, generally employ the doctrine of "prior appropriation"; an entity can claim the rights to water that will enter a waterway even if it hasn't arrived there yet. This means that by collecting rainwater into a cistern, ...


14

All PVC is subject to UV light degradation. PVC without UV protection will eventually suffer a loss of impact resistance. Your pipe will be whole, until impact at which it will shatter or crack instead of flex. Some PVC (PVC UVR) is UV resistant. The sunlight still damages the PVC pipe, but it is in a matrix of other chemicals that compete for the UV ...


13

This is caused by: poor roof design poor gutter installation Since it's not cheap to fix the roof, the solution is to fix the gutters. You simply need larger and/or repositioned gutters. The catch is if you also have heavy snow loads. In that case, you also need strong, well-installed gutters. :) In this case, since it's really only one spot, I'd probably ...


10

If you plan to use that collected water for drinking and cooking then you will need a proper filtration / treatment system... Ingesting diluted bird-droppings is not a good idea... So, a simple filter may not be enough, you may well need UV treatment, but you should consult the authorities for the standards in your location you are legislated to meet and ...


9

Could you turn the end of the downspout 45-90 degrees so the water exits across the roof slope, rather than down it? This would help distribute the downspout flow across more roof area. Not sure if that's a standard approach, but it seems quick and easy to try, and easy to undo if it doesn't work


8

Were it me, I'd consider a 'janky' looking roof much better than premature shingle failure due to overload. Run a section of downspout across your roof and dump it into the existing gutter, angled in the direction of flow, so that the water doesn't splash into the gutter at a 90 degree angle, but joins water already headed for the downspout.


7

Your catchment and cistern (the part that's open to air and thus to contamination by insects/bacteria) should be as small as it can be while still providing enough capacity to take in the rain as it falls. Once rain enters the cistern from the catchment, it should then be pumped into a holding tank which is air- and water-tight, and from which you draw your ...


6

I would look at seeing if you could use large size slider bolts. I used this type of device to provide the safety latch for a large hinged stairway I had built in my garage some 13 years ago. The stairway was raised and lowered via an electric winch and cable/pulley system but I added two of the slide bolts (one on each side) as a safety measure when the ...


5

You could try the gray colored Schedule 80 PVC pipe. This is a much heavier duty material that will stand up to being outdoors. It is recommended by manufacturers. such as U.S. Plastic Corp, that PVC pipe and fittings be painted after installation with a coat of white water based latex paint to provide for UV resistance. The UV light is what is part of the ...


5

Sounds like either the gutters aren't secured tight enough, or you don't have a drip-edge flashing between the roof and gutter. The drip edge deflects water out and away from the house trim and into the gutter. You install it under the shingles, pulled out slightly from the trim, and secured with roofing cement.


5

A good example is the roofs in Bermuda. If you search for 'rain collecting in Bermuda' you'll find lots of examples. Here's one: https://web.archive.org/web/20131015161843/http://www.momcentral.com/blogs/mom-central-goes-green/harvesting-rain-bermuda-life-and-law


5

No it is not safe. NEC requires all conductors to be installed in an appropriate enclosure or totally removed. I suppose I should give you NEC Article 110.3 for the reference that does not allow what your picture is showing. You might want to quote this to your property manager and contractor. Needless to say this is an unsafe situation and you might ...


4

Water will raise the grain of your nice, smooth decking, requiring a re-sand. Also, rain will soak into the wood, requiring a significant dry-time delay before sealing. Yes, you should tarp it.


3

Where is the water damage relative to the exterior ground level? I note in the outside picture that there is significant slope to the ground - if the ground on the uphill and slope-side sides is not shaped to move water away from and around the house, it would be likely that there would be water damage on the lower parts of the walls from water flowing over ...


3

I would suggest the opposite of wallyk. Instead of trying to back track the leak, which probably goes through sealed off areas, try to reproduce it. Dry it, then use a hose on different parts of the outside window, once you have identified what part of the window is admitting the water, look for any ingresses. You basically need to divide the possible areas ...


3

What you need is a set of gargoyles: Definition and Origin of Gargoyles and Grotesques Gargoyles came into gothic architecture in the early 13th century and are defined as "a waterspout, projecting from an upper part of a building or a roof gutter to throw water clear of walls or foundations." The origins of the word 'gargoyle' are derived from the old ...


3

The main risk I can think of is electrocution. Most likely the parts are not designed to get wet, exposed to sun, and/or extreme temperatures. GFCI will protect you if you get electrocuted and the voltage goes to the ground, but if you happen to get electrocuted in a way that continues through the wiring back to the neutral, there will be no voltage ...


3

People who have GFCI trips are way too quick to blame the detector rather than consider it may be doing its job. Rain is very consistent with a genuine ground fault. Since NM cable jacket is at least modestly effective at excluding water, you should check each of your junction boxes on the circuit for water ingress. Not because of a two-bit electrical ...


3

Some possibilities come to mind : Louvered panels, slatted panels, slatted ventilation panels. A google search for the text below gave many from 4" by 4" to fencing and all types in between. slatted ventilation panels


2

I had a similar problem and added a length of corrugated tubing to my existing downspouts. What was happening is that the water came down the downspouts too close to the house. It did not have time to soak into the ground and pooled around the foundation. So using some black corrugated pipe and the right adapters got that water 5-10 feet from the house. ...


2

It seems like the easiest solution would be to just put up a gutter and then move the lower ladder to one of the other walls, no?


2

This is a stunningly bad idea, IMHO. As @Comintern notes, that's a rather significant load to plop beside your house. Far simpler and safer to run your downspouts over to where your sump pump discharges, and put a basin & pump there that pumps water uphill, to your storage tanks, set somewhere uphill, so they will provide water pressure when you are ...


2

First off, your friend should definitely talk to his landlord about the flooding. Even if the landlord won't address it, it's possible your friend could be held liable for water damage from the flooding if he doesn't notify the landlord. There are two big differences between the pump you need here and a normal sump pump. The first is that it won't be run ...


2

Tracing water leaks is one of the most challenging things that one might have to do with a structure. Water can travel quite a distance and in completely non-intuitive paths. It is especially difficult to trace where two materials are butted against each other, like a pair of 2x4s side by side. In this situation, water can travel laterally or upward ...


2

I had a similar problem caused by the lower gutter being overhung by the roof too much. There was only actually about 1/3 of the gutter 'visible' for rain from the roof to fall into. It was resolved by repositioning the guttering. (In our case that was relatively trivial as the guttering was mounted on extendible brackets fitted to the rafter feet).


2

For the second question you might apply some septic dye into the old pipes. But often things get into the basement any old way, and then get trapped in the sump pit, rather than entering via the sump pit. If you have a cleanout you can look into, septic dye might also address the assumption that they connect to the sanitary sewer line at all. Perfectly ...


2

A sump pump normally runs only when there's enough water to lift a float switch, meaning at least several inches. The sump is then allowed to fill until it hits that depth again, at which point the cycle repeats. If the low area is only 2 inches deep, a better solution might be to fill it in. Or fill in enough that you can walk past it and not worry about ...


2

This is generally a bad idea. If they were safe to use outside, the company would have labeled them so. If you insist on trying the experiment, make very sure that they're connected to a GFCI so that you don't shock anyone. I'd argue for an AFCI as well to reduce the chance of starting a fire — by which point you've pushed the cost above just getting ...


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