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36

Those wooden circles are plugs that will pry out of the holes in the balusters. Under that would be a pre-drilled hole for a screw (typically). I would have never used nails on this in the first place. The correct fix is going to be to remove the nails and replace them with screws that fit into the existing holes snugly. If there is really just a nail ...


26

It's called a "Widow's Walk". The name stems from the fact that it was a prominent feature in homes near the sea, where wives of seafarers would (presumably) go to stare out at the ocean, hoping to see their husbands returning, but often finding out that they were widows.


22

That welding would be termed by one of my instructors as “bird droppings”... It needs to be done properly where the weld joins and fills the 90 gap evenly and is called a fillet weld. Get them to grind it out and do it properly. A 4” angle grinder with a new disc will get into that. Have a look at some of the welds shown here: https://www.youtube.com/...


20

No. It's all or nothing. Imagine a visually-impaired person (or someone in the dark) coming down your stairs and the rail ends. What's the assumption? That they've reached the bottom. That can end badly.


12

You'd just slope the 4x4 posts, set the top rails on them, and fit your 2x4 rails underneath. A slight wedge gap would be present, but that's not going to look terrible. I'd reconsider for a few reasons, though: You'll need a substantial slope to drain enough water to make a difference. We're talking about beads of water or, at worst, shallow puddling. Both ...


9

A rule of thumb is that a good weld looks good . Your base metals look like stainless ; If it is strongly magnetic it is ferritic or martensitic. If one of those the welder must use the right fillers to avoid hard brittle welds. The weld shown does not inspire confidence.


7

It appears that the rim joist is pulling away from the joists to which it's nailed due to the outward forces on the railing. You could screw the rim joist to the joists (where those nails are now), which might give a bit more holding power, but you wouldn't gain a lot. Using lag bolts in this situation should be avoided because they won't hold well in the ...


7

That handrail does not meet code, because it is not continuous from top to bottom of stairway and the ends do not terminate correctly at the bottom. The Code (ICC R311.7.7) requires handrails: 1) Height to be between 30” and 38” above the nosing of the tread, and 2) Be continuous on at least one side of a stairway with 4 or more risers and be from a ...


6

Use the core drill you mentioned before, make sure it is deep enough, say 4" to get to the bottom of the iron stub. That is the standard mounting depth. To keep the drill in place, drill a hole in a piece of 3/4" plywood big enough (1'X4'??)to lay on the stair you need to drill with the hole in the place that the old post is located. Stand on this while you ...


6

A parapet. par·a·pet /ˈperəpət/ noun a low protective wall along the edge of a roof, bridge, or balcony. "she stood on the bridge, leaning over the parapet to watch the water race by" This is a definition from Google. There are likely to be stricter definitions in architecture than in literature or military usage, for example. Widow's Walk and Captain's ...


5

After consultation with my master-carpenter-looking-over-my-shoulder, Dan, the following solution was arrived at: 1.The newel post - built up from 1x3 clear oak boards glued together. Two are full length, one is beveled (before gluing) to sit on top of angled knee wall. Attached by two lag bolts at base and one lag bolt into handrail. 2.Base - shoerail ...


4

Interior? Exterior? I'll assume exterior, since you're even considering pressure-treated wood. Cedar generally stands up to weathering considerably better than untreated pine does - hence the cedar siding & roofing all across the USA, but treated pine weathers reasonably well, too. It does like to split a little. Either will require careful priming with ...


4

I dont know how you would make curved channels. But anything short of installing pulleys in the posts I don't think the wires would be tight enough. With the codes 4" maximum opening the wires need to be extremely tight to prevent a child from spreading the wires apart. Plus the turnbuckle and screw eye contradicts the clean lines of the wire.


4

If you cannot find wooden porch rail parts long enough in your local home center, you can use stair rail parts. The handrail comes in lengths up to 16 feet, in oak or hemlock. You would also need shoerail. The center section of each comes out to leave a channel to hold the balusters. All of these are unfinished, but you may be able to find primed versions....


4

Although it is a nuisance to remove all those banisters, it might be feasible to add a similar number of them. Install new banisters between the old ones, but extending upward 25% to 50% longer. Connect their tops with a railing similar to the existing one. In this picture, I haven't yet installed the new top railing, but you get the idea. The banister ...


4

A few tips on this, in addition to JPhi's answer The plugs shouldn't be glued in. They're tapered so they can be tapped into the hole and pried back out. I keep a narrow head flat screwdriver (like this one) for this reason. Tap your narrow head (using a hammer) against the bottom of the plug and you should be able pry it out. Even if it causes damage to ...


4

Just a warning, unless you are pretty handy this should be done by a pro. If you have done large glue ups before, and have 2 people to help at glue up time and everything protected from dripping glue, you may have a chance. It starts with your wood selection, for a finished hand rail that will measure 1 1/4" to 1" thick by 2" wide you will need 8- 1/4" ...


4

You could screw up through the lower 2x4 into the top 2x4, such that the screw heads would be on the bottom of the lower board and not seen from the top. But I think there's a different question here: Why reinforce the existing board? When working on problems like this, I first try to determine the root cause of the problem. Did that 2x4 warp because a 2x4 ...


4

I believe if tubing is used the end of the hand rail must be closed. We use square tubing quite a bit and close the ends at top and bottom I believe this is what the code is referring to.


3

It looks neat. I think I'd be looking for a glass railing engineer (as in an engineer employed by a firm in the business of glass railings or engineered/architectural glass structures in general) to ensure that the glass, mounting and attachments were all adequate. And I like doing stuff myself. I'd just be uncomfortable with the possibilities for building ...


3

We would have to talk to your building department to answer that question. For something like this there may be a serious safety issue. If a small child got hurt or someone got knocked over you would be liable if you didn't fix it and knew about it... It is customary in the US to get the replacement cost of something that isn't code built into the price ...


3

Forget angle brackets, they aren't designed for that direction of force. The images are mine and how I do it, and I'll tell you they are solid railings. Bolt your railing to the rim board and bolt the rim board to the joists with tension ties (or deck ties). If you can do it through the railing posts, it's better, but not necessary) You can't tell in the ...


3

No easy way. The half wall is going to be built like a wall, with studs and a top and bottom plate. You'll have to rip it out, and install a banister in its place.


3

The handrail is primarily a safety device, so make sure you don't sacrifice that goal to save a little bit of work now. Based on your description it doesn't sound like the spindles will really contribute much to the lateral (sideways) strength of the railing. So if you omit the intermediate posts you need to make sure the top rail is constructed with enough ...


3

I have it! 4" cable pulleys (used in garage doors) You put them on the inside, (no post grooving) The 4" diameter means the spacing between strands will be perfect, the tensioning will be uniform, with no kinking. You just offset the opposite pulleys down by 4".


3

Assuming that the framing around the post socket is solid, this is what I'd do for a rock-solid result: Procure some items: Heavy-duty construction adhesive--the kind that comes in a caulking gun tube. Liquid Nails in blue/gold is what I have in mind. Wood shims. 6" are ok. 8" are better. A bubble level in the 2-4' range Utility knife with a fresh blade ...


3

Have you thought if it do you like the idea of adding a industrial looking pipe hand rail? (I think black would look great).You could do a 6” or so version of the kind of mounting seen in this bunk bed railing All these fittings are easily found. Be sure to use a pipe diameter that is code approved I think 1-1/4


3

If you were to replace all the lag bolts, you could play around with plumb by shimming the top or bottom of the post where it sits on the rim joist. Be sure to use galvanized bolts (and healthy sized washers on both ends) that go all the way through the post and the rim joist. A very big caveat: this might have met code where you are, but a 2x4 post -- ...


3

Generally speaking, when the wind gets behind a sail, it exerts considerable force. People have crossed hundreds of miles of ocean with no more than 3m x 3m x 3m. If you manage to affix the corner of the sail firmly to a sturdy pole and affix the pole immovably to the railing, you may be rewarded with the sight of sail, pole, railing, and all soaring off ...


3

I'm not sure it's worth the trouble if you don't have a saw to cut an angle off the posts. Odds are that the wood will dry out to whatever shape it wants to be anyway, either holding or shedding water accordingly. I find any water sitting on top of this board soon evaporates. Just make sure you keep up with the protection on the top board especially. 2x6 is ...


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