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5

Every time me and my colleagues enter this room if the meeting is over ~30 mins we leave with symptoms of fatigue, dizziness and a reduced mental ability, it takes about 1-3 hours to overcome these symptoms. This sounds very much like Carbon Monoxide(CO) poisoning. It saturates your blood, which slowly suffocates you by preventing your blood from carrying ...


4

Threats to health can be scary. But in this case, you'll want to keep on learning about radon. Learn what it is, exactly; learn where it's found in terms of what part of the building, and how it's mitigated. The upshot is I've never heard of a radon mitigation system on the second floor, least of all the 9th! You have more to fear from wildfire.


4

Radon is serious business But at least there's some cool science around it. Ever wonder why volcanos exist? Why is the earth hot? Turns out it is radioactive decay. When God created the earth He "aged" it 5 billion years, which destroyed all radioactive substances except uranium, which has such a long half-life that some still exists. "Half-life" means ...


3

The radon pipe should be tightly sealed through the basement floor. If that gap you identified goes though the floor, then it should be sealed up because the system is supposed to vent radon from the soil. That opening would prevent that from happening and if you had a lot of rain, you could get water rising up through that gap. Wait until the basement ...


2

Pipes are installed under your house and extend up through the roof. If radon will passively escape and lower your radon gas level, then you’re fine. If the radon gas level does not go down, then you’ll need to hook up a fan on one of the pipes running up through your house and “exhaust” them out from under your house.


2

Almost certainly for drainage. Carrying any water leaking in from the walls to the sump. My understanding of radon mitigation would be that this gap and the sump pit need to be sealed from the top and power vented to the exterior. Any underslab drainage on the "basement" side should be connected to the vent system as well. If you already had a radon ...


2

Since it's low-volume and outside I wouldn't worry about it, but Ed's right that there's some indication of blockage. There should be very little back-pressure on that pipe. However, I've never seen downspout used for radon systems. I'm not sure how you'd reliably seal that (and it may not be legal where mitigation is required by code). My guess is that it ...


1

Radon is emitted only from rocks in the ground or from masonry. Unless your apartment is composed entirely of raw concrete and has no ventilation, radon is an unlikely concern. You can buy small testing kits that will tell you how much radon is present. On another note, it also debatable what concentration of radon is linked to an increase in cancer. ...


1

There are 2 types of Radon mitigation systems: 1) gravity, and 2) forced air. 1) Typically a gravity system will be installed, with an option to install an exhaust fan at a later date, if the gravity system is not effective. 2) After the gravity system runs for a year or so, additional readings will be taken to determine if the system is effective and ...


1

Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas that can cause lung cancer. You can't see or smell radon. Testing is the only way to know your level of exposure. See https://www.epa.gov/radon for more info. That said, it looks like you've tested for it by a certified Radon tester and discovered that it's above acceptable levels. You should mitigate it by ...


1

There are several issues: 1) effectiveness of slab vrs. framing/crawl space, 2) effort/cost, 3) storage use, 4) future considerations 1) Both systems are effective and are widely used for radon remediation. The key to both systems is sealing the soil area from the living area. 2) The even if the cost is not important, the effort to level the existing ...


1

Is your current setup like one pictured on this site? What do you mean by "best"? Building a subfloor will be more expensive, but you can probably use your current radon system. Pouring concrete will be a cheaper floor option, but it might not be compatible with your radon system, and refitting it would drive the cost up. The wood floor would be the ...


1

I'm sure that you've walled that in by now... Would the general location of that pipe be a good spot for a wood or pellet stove? My speculation is that pipe layout may be for a 'cold air intake' for a wood stove. When installed in mobile homes wood stoves must be fed by outside air because the mobile home is supposedly 'so tight' relative to air leaking in....


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