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4

Threats to health can be scary. But in this case, you'll want to keep on learning about radon. Learn what it is, exactly; learn where it's found in terms of what part of the building, and how it's mitigated. The upshot is I've never heard of a radon mitigation system on the second floor, least of all the 9th! You have more to fear from wildfire.


3

Concrete is Porous this is why we put vapor barriers down and foundation drains because if there is moisture it will permeate the concrete. Doesn’t that mean the foundation is not done correctly? No concrete is porous and if moisture can make it through it is much easier for a much smaller substance to make it through. Not only can it come just through the ...


2

As I understand it, you cannot possibly "tighten" your basement enough to prevent radon from getting in, there is no way to attain a radon level of zero.


2

Almost certainly for drainage. Carrying any water leaking in from the walls to the sump. My understanding of radon mitigation would be that this gap and the sump pit need to be sealed from the top and power vented to the exterior. Any underslab drainage on the "basement" side should be connected to the vent system as well. If you already had a radon ...


2

I don't think you can build a slab that can prevent radon from entering. The vapor barrier under the slab is what keeps the radon and other soil gasses out. It is really difficult to have perfect seams in the vapor barrier (there are wall seams, seams around post footings, etc). Typical modern requirements for areas known to have high radon levels are for ...


1

The primary reason I think a professional radon inspection might be worth paying for, in the context of buying a house, is that if radon is found, you'll get a thorough report by a professional that explains where and why radon was found, an estimate for the cost of mitigations, and the risks of not doing that. This then becomes a negotiation tool to get ...


1

Systems typically read around 1" WC. The open hole that is whistling is curious. How far from the exhaust pipe is this hole? With that much air being pulled the WC should be higher than 1/4". WC is the difference in column heights not the reading on the positive scale. Add the below zero value to the above zero value.


1

Radon emitted from soil can pass through concrete quite easily. Furthermore, concrete and other earth products themselves can emit radon as well. The fresh air vent coming from under an addition will not be any better with or without a concrete pad if the radon source is not properly mitigated. If you have a concern for radon exposure in your home the only ...


1

Radon is emitted only from rocks in the ground or from masonry. Unless your apartment is composed entirely of raw concrete and has no ventilation, radon is an unlikely concern. You can buy small testing kits that will tell you how much radon is present. On another note, it also debatable what concentration of radon is linked to an increase in cancer. ...


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