Hot answers tagged

13

Radon doesn't cause persistent coughs, and certainly doesn't cause miscarriage. Radon is a non-reactive, radioactive gas that can increase your risk of lung cancer after being exposed to it for long periods of time (years to decades). Reducing the radon levels in your home will do nothing to stop your cough or any other chronic health problems. Mold on ...


6

First Radon is a pretty serious thing if you are working that much inside your basement. I have seen Radon levels in basement stay consistently at 4 times what is in the upper levels. Your 6.8 reading is high but not alarm bells until you get a few readings that high. Initial steps: Open windows. Better than using fans is trying to create a convection ...


5

There's a good reason it's "an insane buy" but since you seem to be committed regardless (these things are why you pay an inspector and put conditions in the contract allowing you to walk away if inspection turns up issues...) There's no guarantee that a new well with solve any (much less all) of the issues, unless it ends up in a different water supply (not ...


5

If you have radon, it's already likely getting in--concrete is permeable. So adding a small nail hole isn't going to change anything. Also note that tapcons don't actually penetrate all the way through the slab. If you have radon, you need to get a radon remediation system installed. This will put a hole in your slab so the radon has a place to go (and then ...


5

Every time me and my colleagues enter this room if the meeting is over ~30 mins we leave with symptoms of fatigue, dizziness and a reduced mental ability, it takes about 1-3 hours to overcome these symptoms. This sounds very much like Carbon Monoxide(CO) poisoning. It saturates your blood, which slowly suffocates you by preventing your blood from carrying ...


4

You are much better off preventing it from entering in the first place. But once it does enter, ventilation is the only way to reduce the levels. How effective this would be depends on the exchange volume. You would be committed to running this exchanger 24/7 for ever. Replacement costs would be much higher than the typical radon fan. Anything running 24/7 ...


4

To check if the fan is working, you can put a plastic bag over the end of the exhaust pipe and see if it inflates. Gauge oil is just the orange fluid that goes in the manometer (pressure meter) tube that indicates the pressure difference being driven by the fan. If it is missing or low, then it could give the negative reading. It should go to zero when the ...


4

That is 100% a code violation. A flexible cord CANNOT be used as a substitute for permanent wiring. The means of disconnect, or service disconnect, is the switch outside. They should have simply hard wired with cable to the receptacle box, or better yet, run a circuit to the fan, not for the added load, but to keep the fan isolated from other loads.


4

If you can hear it, then it's broken. You probably have a broken fin on the blower blade/impeller or a failed bearing. Get someone to check it out before it completely fails.


4

If you are going to concrete this, you need to extend the sewer cleanout or you'll be taking a hammer to the concrete when you need that (if you even remember where it is, then), and you'll need to sleeve the copper waterline with something to protect it from the concrete, or you'll be having a massive leak and needing to hammer the concrete to fix that. ...


4

Radon is serious business But at least there's some cool science around it. Ever wonder why volcanos exist? Why is the earth hot? Turns out it is radioactive decay. When God created the earth He "aged" it 5 billion years, which destroyed all radioactive substances except uranium, which has such a long half-life that some still exists. "Half-life" means ...


4

Threats to health can be scary. But in this case, you'll want to keep on learning about radon. Learn what it is, exactly; learn where it's found in terms of what part of the building, and how it's mitigated. The upshot is I've never heard of a radon mitigation system on the second floor, least of all the 9th! You have more to fear from wildfire.


3

We had the same thing happen to our system. During the winter, water accumulated under the concrete where the radon pipes went into the basement slab and totally blocked the air flow causing our radon levels to go up. We have a 24/7 radon alarm that showed the higher levels. We ordered a new fan but that was not the problem. We cut the pipe near the ...


3

If you are trying to mitigate it, mitigate it; if you can't get a company in to do it, do it yourself. You need to suck it out of the soil under/around the house before it enters the house (indeed, you'd like to change the air leakage to "from the house to the soil", not vice versa) and you do that by reducing the pressure under and around the foundation - ...


3

assumptions from what's in your photo: 1) it looks like the right side of the opening is your access, and the ducts are rigidly installed. 2) the crawlspace looks unheated, as the ducts seem to be insulated, and the fact that you mention radon must mean you have an actively vented (fan) crawlspace to evacuate any radon gas (along with a radon alarm in ...


3

As you have probably learned doing research, there isn't a hard-and-fast cutoff between "safe" and "dangerous". But 2.0 pCi/L seems to be the threshold for considering remediation, and that's for a living space. If you're using the room for exercise you'll probably only be spending a few hours per week there, which would dramatically reduce your exposure. ...


3

Fresh air from outdoors is presumed to be lower in radon concentration than air that is trapped in the house. Any introduction of outside air will thus lower the radon concentration inside the house. The answer to your exact question depends on your goal: Are you trying to see the maximum possible concentration in your house? Then you should keep all ...


3

This is actually just a vacuum measurement system - used to show that there is negative pressure in the radon mitigation system drawing radon gas up and out of your home. As long as the liquid in the right hand arm is higher than the left, then it is working.


3

My basement is quite tightly sealed (it's a newer house), and the cleanout hatch like yours is screwed down piece of plywood, which is caulked all around. I suggest you do something like that, too. Remove the hinges, apply a generous amount of silicone caulk, and screw it down shut. If you ever need to open it, it's easy to do, and if you don't, that seal ...


3

The radon pipe should be tightly sealed through the basement floor. If that gap you identified goes though the floor, then it should be sealed up because the system is supposed to vent radon from the soil. That opening would prevent that from happening and if you had a lot of rain, you could get water rising up through that gap. Wait until the basement ...


3

Concrete is Porous this is why we put vapor barriers down and foundation drains because if there is moisture it will permeate the concrete. Doesn’t that mean the foundation is not done correctly? No concrete is porous and if moisture can make it through it is much easier for a much smaller substance to make it through. Not only can it come just through the ...


2

A u-tube doesn't need calibration in the respect that the difference between the two scales will be twice the static suction. For convenience though, in order to read accurately from 0, it should be "calibrated", because some oil will slowly be lost over the years. Simply disconnect the tops of the tube and slide it until the oil level is even with the zero ...


2

It is oil of a specific density to correspond to the scale. I believe red is one density and blue another, at least for Dwyer manometers. I'm fairly sure replacement oil is available. If you don't care about the accurate reading and only that the fan is working, you could just use plain mineral oil, but you should post a notice next to the gauge that the oil ...


2

There are a variety of risks, including the risk that the system will fail to work as intended. You either punt those to let someone else design the system, or you take them on yourself when you design it. To look at just one that you've thought of: Not growing bacteria in your water system is pretty much a matter of having clean water to start with and ...


2

I would install a frame built out of treated lumber to support the lid. Anchor it to the concrete with construction adhesive and concrete screws (Tapcon). It appears that your pit is very shallow, so you may need to build the frame above the pit and surrounding it to gain height for the pump, etc. I'm thinking 2x4s against the walls and 2x10s oposite, flush ...


2

EPA sets the "Action Level", the level at which mitigation should occur, at 4.0 pCi/L. I agree with @Henry Jackson, if you got 2 short-term test results that averaged 1.7 then continue to use the space as before. The reason for 2 short term tests is to rule out high levels that would pose an immediate threat. You should now conduct a Long-Term Test for a ...


2

Yes, your area is known for radon and it It looks like pipe is the rough-in for a radon system. When we install radon piping, we install a series of perforated pipes embedded into gravel in the crawl space or under a slab-on-grade floor. We also provide a series of pipes in the ground around the exterior of the building too. Usually the two systems are ...


2

Some thoughts: It might still be broken, but it sounds like it may have been making that much noise before and you didn't notice it. You probably should check to see if there's some internal problem - they're usually pretty quiet. Ours is right outside our bedroom, and we barely hear it. But it's on the other side of a brick facade wall, so that probably ...


2

It would be cheap and easy ( my favorites for any home improvement) to spray urethane foam under the tub. You can get it at any lumber/hardware store. It would certainly reduce the amount any gas that might enter that way. It makes a "closed cell "foam which is relatively impermeable.


2

I spoke to the manufacturer this morning and they confirmed that a small number of units went out with the incorrect part number but with the correct model number. So this is the RP265.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible