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1

Air is dissolved in water, that's how fish and many other types of marine life live underwater. As water is heated it releases some of that air. (thanks for the advice, Ed)


2

First, if this is a forced hot-water system with baseboard heating, they're called convectors, not radiators. Bleeding the system is fairly simple (though a bit messy and time-consuming), and, as you diagnosed, the most likely fix. There should be an air bleeder, or purging, valve at the end of each baseboard unit and one in the basement by the boiler, ...


0

Possible reasons: Loss of heating water Failing safety valves Failing automatic air release valves Tenants or house cleaners misusing (radiator breathing) valves as water supply Leaks in the heat exchanger or pipe system, valves or radiators Expansion tank Incorrect pressure setting in air chamber Failing membran Leaks Air in the system ...


5

PEX pipe does not corrode or otherwise interact with copper or other materials the way dissimilar metals do. It's essentially an inert substance under normal circumstances. The bulges and darkened areas, however, do appear to be signs of a problem and I agree with your assessment that these were caused by heat, probably from the torch used to sweat the ...


1

Yes, I believe there is a strong possibility that is asbestos. Please get it tested and, if confirmed, professionally abated. I believe there are some fiberglass-based products that would be a good choice today.


1

Here in Italy pex is widely used for new heating system (both radiators and underfloor), just check the maximum allowed temperature is high enough (I'd say over 120°C) and you could use it for both flow and return. The story is different if your heating is steam. The slope could be there because originally it was naturally-circulated hot water (hot water) ...


1

I don't have any first hand experience, but I don't think there's anything wrong with using PEX for a hot waater heating system. I base this on two recent observaations. 1) A new $million+ house I was in uses PEX to distribute hot water from a central boiler & manifold to places of use. 2) My son's old house used PEX to send hot water from the boiler ...


1

For an easier job, I would not go to the trouble of stripping the paint back to the metal, unless your radiator is in poor or rusty condition. In which case it might be more economical to replace it. You can lightly abrade the existing topcoat with P120 or P180 grit sandpaper to de-gloss the surface and provide a key for the new paint to stick to. Try not ...


2

The radiator is probably steel. To remove the paint, you can sandpaper it. Optimally, you should dismount it, so you're able to get to the back of it as well. If you dismount it, you can also take it to a workshop and have it sandblasted. That's the quick way to strip the paint. As for painting: If you get down to bare steel, apply a primer that is ...


0

You have baseboard heat AND forced air? Because if you HAD baseboard heat at one point and someone CHANGED to forced air, but just left the old baseboards there, I would consider removing them, then taking the hardwood all the way to the base of the wall. If you are still using the baseboard heaters, then you have to be concerned for the air flow coming ...


2

That looks like the body of a Thermostatic valve (TRV). It looks like the actuator pin (in the center of the front face) is stuck in. This can usually be unstuck by wiggling with a pair of pliers. If it's really stubborn, some WD-40 or a LIGHT tap with a small hammer may help. You can then get a new TRV head and add that to control the room temp. There ...


0

The smooth one is a cover, the valve inside that is for isolating the radiator for maintenance - you remove the cover and inside is essentially the same valve as at the other end, so you can use the knob off that to engage the shaft. The ridged one should be able to turn, but has probably not been moved in years and is siezed through silt and lime. The ...


1

Maybe your hot water always runs through the towel heater ( when the hot water is flowing to any fixture). In an older hotel in Bournemouth ; I had a room where the steam/water always flowed through the towel heater ( when the heat was on).


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