5

PEX pipe does not corrode or otherwise interact with copper or other materials the way dissimilar metals do. It's essentially an inert substance under normal circumstances. The bulges and darkened areas, however, do appear to be signs of a problem and I agree with your assessment that these were caused by heat, probably from the torch used to sweat the ...


2

With the boiler removed, if there is any water it will be minimal and not under pressure. Have some towels handy unless you want to go to the bother of figuring out where to connect an air hose or shop vacuum to the presumably disconnected pipes where the boiler used to be. And then have some towels handy anyway, but either of those will help get some of the ...


2

Possible manufacturer could be: https://www.emerson.com/en-us/catalog/therm-o-disc-10h Product bulletin describes how the thermostat works: The 10H capillary tube is vacuum-charged with selected fluids to give specific calibrations. When the calibration temperature is reached, a change in fluid vapor pressure allows the diaphragm to snap through and ...


2

According to the manufacturer, Heat-Timer Corp. The item pictured is a "Varivalve" air vent. "The function of the radiator air vent is to provide a means for air to be driven out of the radiator as steam enters. At a given pressure the fill time of a radiator varies proportional to its heat capacity and inversely proportional to the venting capacity ...


2

The radiator is probably steel. To remove the paint, you can sandpaper it. Optimally, you should dismount it, so you're able to get to the back of it as well. If you dismount it, you can also take it to a workshop and have it sandblasted. That's the quick way to strip the paint. As for painting: If you get down to bare steel, apply a primer that is ...


2

That looks like the body of a Thermostatic valve (TRV). It looks like the actuator pin (in the center of the front face) is stuck in. This can usually be unstuck by wiggling with a pair of pliers. If it's really stubborn, some WD-40 or a LIGHT tap with a small hammer may help. You can then get a new TRV head and add that to control the room temp. There ...


1

Yes, I believe there is a strong possibility that is asbestos. Please get it tested and, if confirmed, professionally abated. I believe there are some fiberglass-based products that would be a good choice today.


1

Here in Italy pex is widely used for new heating system (both radiators and underfloor), just check the maximum allowed temperature is high enough (I'd say over 120°C) and you could use it for both flow and return. The story is different if your heating is steam. The slope could be there because originally it was naturally-circulated hot water (hot water) ...


1

I don't have any first hand experience, but I don't think there's anything wrong with using PEX for a hot waater heating system. I base this on two recent observaations. 1) A new $million+ house I was in uses PEX to distribute hot water from a central boiler & manifold to places of use. 2) My son's old house used PEX to send hot water from the boiler ...


1

For an easier job, I would not go to the trouble of stripping the paint back to the metal, unless your radiator is in poor or rusty condition. In which case it might be more economical to replace it. You can lightly abrade the existing topcoat with P120 or P180 grit sandpaper to de-gloss the surface and provide a key for the new paint to stick to. Try not ...


1

Maybe your hot water always runs through the towel heater ( when the hot water is flowing to any fixture). In an older hotel in Bournemouth ; I had a room where the steam/water always flowed through the towel heater ( when the heat was on).


1

OK I got it. I had one of those in my kitchen, under a counter. Not sure of the official name for it, but I've heard it called a "heatilator". It's basically part of your baseboard hot water heating system. I think the purpose of the metal cover is to provide a sort of chimney effect, where the rising air gains a bit of velocity and helps pull cooler air ...


1

That's a thermostatic valve, a mechanical device which closes when exposed to heat and opens when cool. As the hot steam enters the radiator the air inside escapes through the valve. Once the hot steam reaches the valve it shuts, trapping the steam inside. As the steam cools it condenses and the resulting water returns through the pipe, while the now open (...


1

Replacing the windows with modern double-paned isn't worth the cost; they're not that much better. However, I would recommend looking around for gaps around the windows where the putty stuff has dried out and repairing them. That's a mostly-labor job, and isn't that hard. In general, your first goal should be to seal any gaps. This is not only much cheaper ...


1

Seems your TRV was allowing a small flow to maintain the temperature of the (disconnected) radiator. Try capping the open end of the pipe, the male end in your illustration. Your local hardware store will have the right sized cap; take a cell-phone photo of the threaded open end with a ruler placed next to it, at the maximum width of the threads. To be ...


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