10

The typical way to pre-warm water is to install a standard tank water heater before the tankless, but leave it turned off. Using an automotive radiator is a terrible idea. You don't want to connect something not designed for potable water to your plumbing. That's just asking for trouble. The pex idea is interesting. The only reason that I can think that ...


9

Bleeding radiators is quite simple, and can usually be done by homeowners. All that's required is a radiator key, a towel and/or bowl, and a bit of time. Why Bleed Radiators Even with closed systems, air can still find its way into the system. When it does, it will collect at the highest points available (the top of radiators). Trapped air can cause ...


8

You could add a smaller tank-less heater in front. Some of them are even rated to be plugged into an outlet so you won't have to do additional electrical work. In Europe I've seen it done with a bigger unit to supply the whole house and a smaller one at the shower for use during the winter. In either case you're going to get a lot further with this ...


7

The official statement is that if you have no calor BT app that is currently paired, you are lost and should return the device to the dealer as broken. However, there is a way out - the following steps are written for a Linux environment but probably can be adapted to other OSes: Install a current (!) VirtualBox and VirtualBox Extension Pack for USB ...


7

PEX pipe does not corrode or otherwise interact with copper or other materials the way dissimilar metals do. It's essentially an inert substance under normal circumstances. The bulges and darkened areas, however, do appear to be signs of a problem and I agree with your assessment that these were caused by heat, probably from the torch used to sweat the ...


6

This is an old question, but I just wanted to add: Adding a fan to a radiator will not increase the overall efficiency of your heating system (at least the way efficiency is normally expressed: usable heat output per unit of fuel, or per dollar). Adding a fan will make the radiator deliver heat to the room more rapidly, but the boiler will then have to work ...


6

From what I've read and experienced with household radiators: Building a cover over a radiator, according to everything I can find about radiator efficiency, will absolutely decrease efficiency about 30%. This is true even if reflective material is added. Radiator shelves and enclosures were often meant for this purpose - to control an oversized radiator. ...


5

I'm afraid your super is right. The supply valve must either be fully open or fully closed. If it is partially open, condensate cannot properly drain back to the boiler. It will collect in your radiator instead. How much heat is put out is regulated by the size of the vent valve. If the boiler works by central control, meaning the steam goes on and off for ...


5

You are correct that having a hot radiator on what's effectively a cold space - the porch - is very inefficient and, presuming nobody's on the porch most of the time, wastes a lot of energy. And you are correct that the hot water going into that radiator is being cooled in the process. However, it is unlikely that the water is going to any other radiators, ...


4

To echo what @acrosman said, yes insulate the pipes. I'd suggest using fiberglass pipe insulation joined with foil tape, and loose fiberglass / PVC caps for turns. Wear a respirator. Cuts can be made with a sharp, long utility knife. here's an example:


4

To answer your question, the radiators in your home are a closed loop. If they are single-pipe steam radiators, then there is a small amount of vapor loss out of the little valve on the radiator. (The one that may hiss a bit while warming up.) If you have that type of system, the water level in your boiler must occasionally be topped up, but that would be a ...


4

We ended up bleeding the radiators, upping the pressure, and replacing the thermocouple. After all of that, we discovered that flames had been shooting out of the front of the boiler and melted half of the valve, messing up the electronics for the pilot light. We ended up replacing the entire boiler since it was 35 years old anyway, but the reason for the ...


4

Do NOT use an automotive radiator - it's not meant for nor suitable for potable water use. If you have a "relatively warm basement" you can either use a plain, uninsulated pressure tank (a "tempering" tank in this application - cold in the bottom, warmed out the top) or run a long run of large-ish diameter PEX (to minimize pressure drop) around the basement ...


3

This type of radiator should be warm to the touch, not hot like an cast iron radiator. If you touch the fins with two or three fingers it should feel hot enough to be very uncomfortable. Lastly, go to incoming pipe coming up through the floor again, it should be very hot, too hot to touch for more than a few seconds. Usually the water moving through the ...


3

There is a pretty new product in the UK market at least, which is a radiator fan unit. It does need a power source but it has a built in thermostat so it only turns on when the radiator gets hot. Seems to be quite effective, we have one and it made a real difference to our living room. Not sure if they are in any stores or anything yet but we just got ours ...


3

Don't change them. Single line steam radiators are tricky at the best of times, and most modern plumbers have little experience with them. In addition base board radiators make it impossible to put bookcases in. (In our climate they use up all of the external wall.) There are lots of ways to dress them up Recessing them is a bad idea, as the space to ...


3

The pipes should look like this: There should be an unrestricted flow around the system. Each radiator should be connected to both the flow (red) pipe and return (blue) pipe. The turnable value (or better still thermostatic valve) should be on the input to each radiator. There should be a simple on/off valve on the outlet which is normally set to fully ...


3

If the radiators are still hot you'll have to get the shut offs repaired first. The heat and the resulting drying action will raise havoc with the wood. The issue isn't so much a fire hazard as a drying hazard. The wood is going to shrink in the winter and expand in the summer. The seams and joints will split. I would also make the design so that you have ...


3

In the technical guides for the Giacomini valves, it appears that some of the heads can be removed by unscrewing it past the the open position. Have you tried that? This is assuming that the top part on your model spins. For other models, it appears the whole head pulls off the valve. An example is shown in this guide: http://www.giacomini.com/export/sites/...


3

This is the sound of metal pipes and radiator components expanding and contracting. As they do so, they rub against other fixed parts, like wood framing, brackets, etc. If they stick slightly, you'll hear a popping or clicking sound as they stick and unstick from the friction against this expansion and contraction. So the solution is to locate any points ...


3

Low water Air lock or circulator not working is most common problems. What is the pressure of system ? Should be around 12 cold 20 hot. Add water to system if lower. You may have automatic feeder. Check for any air bleeder that can be open.


3

You could try using a portable fan to blow air across the radiator so that the room becomes more evenly heated. The moving air will actually extract more heat from the radiator than still air would, so you may find that this makes the room noticeably warmer.


3

Do you know for sure that this is a hot water system? Sometimes steam can sound like running water. If it is hot water, there is a giant air bubble in the radiator preventing it from filling. It needs to be bled off by opening the small valve near the top at one end. You will typically need some sort of tool or key for this. Slowly open the valve. Along with ...


3

Other than looking for hidden bleeders (i.e. I have one where the baseboard cover needs to be removed to reveal the bleeder) and bleeding any bleeders that you can find, you may need to swear at whoever put in the new radiators and retrofit bleeders where they are missing. There is often an automatic bleeder/vent on or just after (in which case it's often ...


3

Why is knob and tube top priority to replace? It's quite safe if left alone. You only need to replace it in visible areas: the stuff behind the wall doesn't need replacing. You might want to add some circuits in certain rooms, but you don't have to remove the old ones. No upgrading the radiators (from your description they don't sound like baseboard ...


3

The item on the left is the steam trap and can not be regulated or shut off. stay away from this item. The shut-off valve is the item with the screw on the top. Turn the nut ccw (counter clockwise), just slightly about a 1/4 turn, then put a wrench on the stem above the nut, I would use a 6" or 8" pipe wrench or vise grips, and try to turn cw (clockwise) ...


3

Possible manufacturer could be: https://www.emerson.com/en-us/catalog/therm-o-disc-10h Product bulletin describes how the thermostat works: The 10H capillary tube is vacuum-charged with selected fluids to give specific calibrations. When the calibration temperature is reached, a change in fluid vapor pressure allows the diaphragm to snap through and ...


3

These are dual-fuel radiators. Meaning they actually can use heat from two different sources, which is why the numbers aren't adding up the way you expect. In their standard mode of operation, they work just like a traditional radiator on a hot water heating system -- water is heated in a central boiler, then pumped through radiators throughout the building....


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