5

If you want to do radiant infloor heating you will need to insulate under the slab. If you don't you will constantly be rejecting heat to the ground underneath the slab, and it will suck excess heat out of the system. If your not going to insulate beneath the slab, abandon the idea of radiant infloor. Your also going to have to use HE Pex for radiant ...


3

Here are some potential downsides, besides cost (which is a big one): Can't have central air conditioning. How to heat the basement? I assume you plan on insulating under the PEX tubing to make most of the heat go through the floor. This makes it tough to heat the basement, if that's something you want. Will the warm floors be noticable? For well-insulated ...


3

That is the drain valve, and yes the screw on top opens or closes the valve. Normally a water heater is filled using the normal supply piping on top, by opening the shutoff valves and opening some hot water taps to release any air trapped in the system.


3

There’s several issues you’ll need to determine to “dig-out basement” 1) location and type of all existing footings, 2) load on existing footings, 3) angle of repose of soil, 4) water table. 1) In order to not undermine the existing footings, you’ll need to not only locate the extent of all footings, but insure you understand what type of footings are ...


3

Will using an electric space heater improve the efficiency of a heat pump? No. When the temperature drops below the operational range of the heat pump, resistive heaters are used to provide heat. This would be the same as a space heater. However when the heat pump is running the heat pump is far more efficient at heating than a space heater. Depending on ...


2

After checking what type of instant water heater that is - since it's gas-fired, your operating cost will be MUCH lower with gas providing the heat than with electric resistance heat. Perhaps 30% (not 30% less, unless you have remarkably low electric rates and high gas rates) - typically near 30% of the cost of running electric resistance heat, for the same ...


2

You could order a cheap thermal camera ($200 from http://www.thermal.com/ ) and see them. I have no affiliation with that company but own one of their products and LOVE it.


2

Your goals are somewhat at odds. Even where radiant floor heating is used as the only source of heat, the floor typically does not get anywhere near "toasty." The floor temp is typically only 5 to 10 degrees above ambient (75 to 80 F), and the vast size of the radiator (i.e. the entire floor) provides enough energy to heat the entire space with such a ...


2

That is the drain valve and you only need to use it in the event that you should have to drain or empty your water heater. It is opened and closed by turning the screw on the top of the valve. Reasons for draining may be to flush your water heater out or to empty it in order to remove or service it, or if you do not have any other drain valve for your ...


2

Electric resistance heat is a great long-term solution for the electric power supplier; it's usually one of the most expensive heat options for the homeowner to run, barring power subsidies or absurdly cheap power, which happens a few places, but not many. The details will be local, so you'll have to investigate the relative costs of the heat sources you ...


2

Heat moves from hot to cold. The more insulation you put in walls, roof lines, or attics, the more heat you push into the uninsulated ground. It makes sense to insulate and isolate the ground from your inside environment even if it doesn't have floor heating. Never install radiant without insulation, the insulation is more important than the radiant ...


2

Concrete is not an insulator. It is thermal mass; virtually the opposite thing. You absolutely need to insulate your slab on all sides that you don't want heat escaping (i.e. all but the top). If you can't put insulation under the new radiant hydronic slab, you should abandon it. 50% of the heat will he lost under the house. It will run all the time and ...


2

Here is the way a system like yours should work. The heating tank, tank #2, is set to maintain a set water temp. That temp is determined by how the water temp is maintained. It could have a programming sensor that adjusts the temp up or down depending on the outdoor temp or could have a manual set point usually around 125 degree F max. Now to answer your ...


2

If in only 1 pipe is there a derate for the number of current carrying conductors? In the U.S. I would be using thhn/thwn wire, but with 25 amp actual draw I would need to upsize the wire to #8 because 125% of 25 is 31.25a . 1-1/2 rigid pvc would allow 18 #8 , i would not try to pull multi conductor cables through conduit it costs more and is not needed ...


2

I'm currently storing 9 240VAC 500 watt radiant (or infrared) panels; not sure if I'll use them or not, but they certainly exist in the US market. Mine were taken out and replaced with an oil-fired boiler as a less expensive source of heat. The space they were in had at least a 10 ft ceiling and they were ceiling-mounted, and quite effective, just expensive ...


1

Your choice of radiant heat is the best, no matter where you put it, albeit it will not be the most efficient under your floors as a retro fit. The way radiant works is just that, radiant. Extremely different than forced air, where warm air is blowing out of ducts, dramatically changing the humidity. If warm air was blowing under your floor, yes they may ...


1

theory is that the pipes are hot enough that radiation is signficant. Putting a low IR emmisivity surface reduces the amount of radiant energy the bottom of the cavity absorbs. If you just have a low e foil, then you cut the radiation in half. However by conduction the entire air space gets warm. So you will have the foil as a barrier for conduction too....


1

After you remove the floor, dig 2 inches lower for the insulation and pour the new slab to the same thickness as before.


1

Gosh - a buck a therm is "expensive gas rates" - if I could get it (I can't and never expect to) it's more like a buck and a half...year round. So, you're using 1 million to 1.3 million BTUs/day - if you could manage storage swing of 50 degrees F (not unreasonable with radiant floor, a low-temperature emitter) that might be 3250 gallons of water (at a round ...


1

It would almost undoubtedly be a better use of your available money, time, and space to add insulation, not a complicated solar heat storage system, which after all, will do nothing for you half the year. Start with your basement and insulate the walls and the rim joists. Then move to your attic and air seal the floor and add about 12-16 inches of cellulose ...


1

If you originally had 4 thermostats, each controlling 1 zone, then the normal way for wiring was that a thermostat opened and closed each zone valve and when the zone valve opened an end switch made and allowed the boiler to fire. Zone valves can be either 2 wire or 3 wire hook-up. Most are 2 wire but there are some 3 wire available. AS I said, that is the ...


1

You'd need custom heat spreaders, and it still won't work well The heat spreaders used for hydronic systems only spread the heat along one face (so either a subfloor or the ceiling drywall). You would need to get a custom heat spreader for a single tube to do both. A hydronic radiant ceiling also requires much higher temperatures than a floor does, so you'...


1

I'd have to go with #5 as the better way and only right way. If the partial new floor has to come up for radiant heating anyway, and it does, then I'd strip everything to the joists and do it right with screws. You'll be eternally quiet, solid and comfortable with the heating protected by the subfloor and reflected up by foil-faced insulation for maximum ...


1

You're a bit stuck here The Carrier Infinity system isn't a standard "on-off" control, unlike conventional thermostats. Instead, it uses a serial connection between the thermostat and the controlled devices (zone controller + furnace in your case), which the Nest hasn't a clue how to speak. Your best bet for integrating more sophisticated automation into ...


1

This is a very common problem in old steam heated buildings. They get too hot or too cold. Your only option as a renter is to open windows or use vent fans if you have them. I would contact your landlord or management company and see what they have to say. Perhaps they have a solution. You can also talk to your super and see if they have any tips or tricks. ...


1

I would maintain a hot water heating system for the increased comfort. Forced air is actually quite uncomfortable to people but it is cheap to install. Just google "ideal heating curve" and you will see the many graphs comparing different types of heating systems. Like here. And here. So you can choose, save money now and suffer or spend more now and be ...


1

I do not know if the piping has been corrected however let me make a few comments: you cannot daisy chain cast iron radiators and expect them to work/heat properly. Each radiator must have its own supply and return piping. Also you cannot series connect radiators. As to the radiator being piped backwards it will only affect the operation a small amount and ...


1

I can't say I'm familiar with your setup, but only with big old radiators & baseboards of the same principal & setup. Your problem is no problem in those systems, they are just to circulate water in one direction of a daisy-chain. The only definition of inlet was which side a flow management valve was installed on. But, definitely get the plumber ...


1

in Oregon we have a lot of these the most common is the contacts weld shut on the contactor/relay most of these systems here are 220v and they only switch 1 leg usually the thermostats had the contact but it sounds like your thermostat is the controll for a relay/contactor it will probably be located in a metal box in the ceiling if you find it tap it it may ...


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