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If you want to do radiant infloor heating you will need to insulate under the slab. If you don't you will constantly be rejecting heat to the ground underneath the slab, and it will suck excess heat out of the system. If your not going to insulate beneath the slab, abandon the idea of radiant infloor. Your also going to have to use HE Pex for radiant ...


3

Here are some potential downsides, besides cost (which is a big one): Can't have central air conditioning. How to heat the basement? I assume you plan on insulating under the PEX tubing to make most of the heat go through the floor. This makes it tough to heat the basement, if that's something you want. Will the warm floors be noticable? For well-insulated ...


3

That is the drain valve, and yes the screw on top opens or closes the valve. Normally a water heater is filled using the normal supply piping on top, by opening the shutoff valves and opening some hot water taps to release any air trapped in the system.


3

There’s several issues you’ll need to determine to “dig-out basement” 1) location and type of all existing footings, 2) load on existing footings, 3) angle of repose of soil, 4) water table. 1) In order to not undermine the existing footings, you’ll need to not only locate the extent of all footings, but insure you understand what type of footings are ...


3

Will using an electric space heater improve the efficiency of a heat pump? No. When the temperature drops below the operational range of the heat pump, resistive heaters are used to provide heat. This would be the same as a space heater. However when the heat pump is running the heat pump is far more efficient at heating than a space heater. Depending on ...


3

There are lots of resources covering this topic, and since your question is rather broad I'm inclined to refer mostly to them. In general, you can install hardwood over floor heat if: Subfloor temperatures are reasonable (say within 15 degrees of room air temperature) You stick to quartersawn wood species that are known to handle heat well, or You go with ...


2

After checking what type of instant water heater that is - since it's gas-fired, your operating cost will be MUCH lower with gas providing the heat than with electric resistance heat. Perhaps 30% (not 30% less, unless you have remarkably low electric rates and high gas rates) - typically near 30% of the cost of running electric resistance heat, for the same ...


2

You could order a cheap thermal camera ($200 from http://www.thermal.com/ ) and see them. I have no affiliation with that company but own one of their products and LOVE it.


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Your goals are somewhat at odds. Even where radiant floor heating is used as the only source of heat, the floor typically does not get anywhere near "toasty." The floor temp is typically only 5 to 10 degrees above ambient (75 to 80 F), and the vast size of the radiator (i.e. the entire floor) provides enough energy to heat the entire space with such a ...


2

Electric resistance heat is a great long-term solution for the electric power supplier; it's usually one of the most expensive heat options for the homeowner to run, barring power subsidies or absurdly cheap power, which happens a few places, but not many. The details will be local, so you'll have to investigate the relative costs of the heat sources you ...


2

Heat moves from hot to cold. The more insulation you put in walls, roof lines, or attics, the more heat you push into the uninsulated ground. It makes sense to insulate and isolate the ground from your inside environment even if it doesn't have floor heating. Never install radiant without insulation, the insulation is more important than the radiant ...


2

Concrete is not an insulator. It is thermal mass; virtually the opposite thing. You absolutely need to insulate your slab on all sides that you don't want heat escaping (i.e. all but the top). If you can't put insulation under the new radiant hydronic slab, you should abandon it. 50% of the heat will he lost under the house. It will run all the time and ...


2

That is the drain valve and you only need to use it in the event that you should have to drain or empty your water heater. It is opened and closed by turning the screw on the top of the valve. Reasons for draining may be to flush your water heater out or to empty it in order to remove or service it, or if you do not have any other drain valve for your ...


2

Here is the way a system like yours should work. The heating tank, tank #2, is set to maintain a set water temp. That temp is determined by how the water temp is maintained. It could have a programming sensor that adjusts the temp up or down depending on the outdoor temp or could have a manual set point usually around 125 degree F max. Now to answer your ...


2

If in only 1 pipe is there a derate for the number of current carrying conductors? In the U.S. I would be using thhn/thwn wire, but with 25 amp actual draw I would need to upsize the wire to #8 because 125% of 25 is 31.25a . 1-1/2 rigid pvc would allow 18 #8 , i would not try to pull multi conductor cables through conduit it costs more and is not needed ...


2

I'm currently storing 9 240VAC 500 watt radiant (or infrared) panels; not sure if I'll use them or not, but they certainly exist in the US market. Mine were taken out and replaced with an oil-fired boiler as a less expensive source of heat. The space they were in had at least a 10 ft ceiling and they were ceiling-mounted, and quite effective, just expensive ...


2

The ribbed side is the neutral (actually called grounded conductor, not to be confused with the equipment grounding conductor). NEC 400.22 Grounded-Conductor Identification. One conductor of flexible cords that is intended to be used as a grounded circuit conductor shall have a continuous marker that readily distinguishes it from the other conductor or ...


2

I have almost the exact same setup as you (hydronic floor heat and air handler for backup heat) and mine works with one tstat just fine. So while you aren't asking for too much from "a" thermostat, you may be asking too much from "that" thermostat. I looked at the specs and didn't see anything about 2nd stage heat or aux heat, it might ...


2

Comment, not an answer (but it might be): [I am new and won't let me 'comment' until '50' reputation; but it DOES let me 'answer', go figure...] Correct, it is a No-no to cross transformer supplies (at the R's). Most equipment now have one side of the 24VAC transformer physically attached to ground. This will lead to having both (or potentially 3, if AC has ...


2

You need an expansion tank on a closed-circuit hydronic loop. You'll also need air vents for removing the dissolved air when it comes out of solution as the water (or antifreeze) heats. These are commonly deployed on the bottom and top of an "air scoop" which is a standard hydronic heating component. You ALSO need a pressure and temperature relief ...


2

Because the radiant floor could get too hot while the external temperature sensor still indicates below required T. This could damage the element or part of the floor. The underfloor heating (water) I fitted had two temperature sensors - one for the ambient and one at the output of the mixing valve to shut down the pump if the output was above a certain ...


1

Your choice of radiant heat is the best, no matter where you put it, albeit it will not be the most efficient under your floors as a retro fit. The way radiant works is just that, radiant. Extremely different than forced air, where warm air is blowing out of ducts, dramatically changing the humidity. If warm air was blowing under your floor, yes they may ...


1

theory is that the pipes are hot enough that radiation is signficant. Putting a low IR emmisivity surface reduces the amount of radiant energy the bottom of the cavity absorbs. If you just have a low e foil, then you cut the radiation in half. However by conduction the entire air space gets warm. So you will have the foil as a barrier for conduction too....


1

After you remove the floor, dig 2 inches lower for the insulation and pour the new slab to the same thickness as before.


1

Gosh - a buck a therm is "expensive gas rates" - if I could get it (I can't and never expect to) it's more like a buck and a half...year round. So, you're using 1 million to 1.3 million BTUs/day - if you could manage storage swing of 50 degrees F (not unreasonable with radiant floor, a low-temperature emitter) that might be 3250 gallons of water (at a round ...


1

It would almost undoubtedly be a better use of your available money, time, and space to add insulation, not a complicated solar heat storage system, which after all, will do nothing for you half the year. Start with your basement and insulate the walls and the rim joists. Then move to your attic and air seal the floor and add about 12-16 inches of cellulose ...


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If you originally had 4 thermostats, each controlling 1 zone, then the normal way for wiring was that a thermostat opened and closed each zone valve and when the zone valve opened an end switch made and allowed the boiler to fire. Zone valves can be either 2 wire or 3 wire hook-up. Most are 2 wire but there are some 3 wire available. AS I said, that is the ...


1

The system you describe is a "monoflo" system. They work pretty well when installed correctly. It sounds as though yours is installed correctly. If you want individual control in each piece of radiation you could add rad valves to each radiator piece. If you are not well versed in this, I would seek professional help so you don't change something that is ...


1

You'd need custom heat spreaders, and it still won't work well The heat spreaders used for hydronic systems only spread the heat along one face (so either a subfloor or the ceiling drywall). You would need to get a custom heat spreader for a single tube to do both. A hydronic radiant ceiling also requires much higher temperatures than a floor does, so you'...


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