New answers tagged

0

I can answer from experience rather than comparison or speculation because I have done the very thing you describe, starting with a proof of concept using a window unit. This perhaps should be a comment; however, answering is the path to gain reputation to do that so here you go... Verifying effectiveness on actual equipment Other answers have covered ...


0

I have had a similar problem with a square D pressure switch locking out in my case it was the position the switch was in. These have a safety that you are resetting so if the actual pressure is below the set point (low water level pump running but not building pressure) it requires a manual reset my pressure was set 50 and the air in the bladder was charged ...


1

I don't know about the electrical cost saving aspect but one thing to consider for sure is that your plan involves spraying dirty water onto your condenser coils. A condensate reservoir is a breeding ground for all sorts of nasty things. You ever notice how a condensate reservoir and output line always gets discolored? Now you wish to continuously spray this ...


2

Safer than going to the distribution box is to use a true RMS AC current clamp meter such as this: https://www.amazon.com/KAIWEETS-Multimeter-Auto-ranging-Temperature-Capacitance/dp/B07Z398YWF/ together with a current splitter, such as this: https://www.amazon.com/Amprobe-ELS2A-AC-Line-Splitter/dp/B001DPR0FE/ Unfortunately, clamp meters (especially cheap ...


2

As another poster mentioned, the only way to know if there's any appreciable gain in efficiency is to measure it. The physics says the system should be more efficient since you're lowering the temperature of the condenser. How much, and if this is measurable at all are hard to determine by theory alone. Rather than setting up complicated tests over ...


4

should this come out ahead since the water is "free" as condensate? Probably. Your logic is sound.. As others have mentioned, heat pumps are already quite efficient, and the most you can gain from this system is going to be dependent on how much condensate the evaporator produces as well as the outdoor humidity. Unfortunately both of these are ...


12

Disclaimer: This question is about Air Conditioners. The "You" discussed below is an air conditioner owner. This answer is not about heat pumps, which are a different class of equipment (operating on the same scientific principle, but there the similarity ends). Well, an aircon owner would likely ruin their condenser coils* by letting water ...


15

See other answer for how to test for actual efficiency gain, but you're basically cooling your output coil with a swamp cooler. In commercial settings it's called a free cooler. Water is either misted or dripped over a porous substance that the cooling air passes through. It cools the air as it evaporates, but greatly increases humidity. The concern I ...


9

If you gather and archive a local source of weather data, and operate the mist system on alternate days for a while, you should be able to gather a pretty good sense of the effect on power use, despite variations in internal and external temperatures & dewpoints. Over time, your data set will have "directly comparable days" as well as "...


25

Clamp Power Meter Buy or borrow a clamp power-meter with a "kWh" feature, that is, the ability to perform an energy measurement. Not all clamp meters have this, e.g. a "True RMS" meter performs an accurate power measurement for non-sinusoidal signals but still not an energy measurement. Open the AC unit or the electrical panel (careful, ...


0

I have had success in a similar situation using an automatic regulating valve (also known as a flow limiter). The REG valve from flows.com maintains a constant flow rate (within a range) regardless of pressure. I believe it works with a spring loaded flow restrictor that closes the flow path as pressure increases. These are simple inline valves that resemble ...


3

Your use of GFCI is highly correct Electric-shock drownings are an epidemic in the U.S. This is when someone goes dockside, or to a pond, or in a fountain, and is shocked by leakage current. Often, this takes out their rescuers, too, in a tragic daisy chain until a rescuer arrives who realizes this is an elecricity problem AND has rubberized waders OR ...


Top 50 recent answers are included