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25

Nononono! Tell him to save his latex paint! I sometimes paint things at industrial sites. Latex works fine on the buildings, but when it is used on steelwork of any kind, it turns into an unmitigated disaster, that you pay for for decades. This is a metal thing left outdoors. It will have much higher extremes of temperature than a house's walls. It ...


17

Porch and floor paints are formulated to work well on floors and are self priming. Very few primers are rated for floor use, so what you would have is a "bad" primer layer followed by proper floor paint which would give inconsistent results. Consequences would most likely be chipping and peeling paint because the primer was too thick, too soft, or ...


7

The results I get for that product name indicate that it is oil based. As such, water cleanup won't do. You should (before painting, with a clean brush) dip your brush in paint thinner and wipe it out so that the deep parts of the brush are -pre-loaded with thinner rather than paint. When done painting, you need to clean the brush with paint thinner, not ...


5

The rule of thumb is you can use latex paints over oil primers and latex primers. Do not use oil based paints over any surface currently coated with a latex primer or paint. The oil based paint or primer will usually lift the latex product and leave you with a wrinkled surface that looks like alligator skin.


5

yes, you can use it, just re-prime it. You'll see that the fresh coat of primer with melt right through the dried primer.


5

You should add another coat if you don't think it looks good enough. If you think it looks good with one coat, don't put on a second. In more concrete terms, you generally add another coat if the color or finish is not even. That may come with one coat, or it may take two, three, or even more. It depends on the surface, the primer, the paint, any existing ...


5

Absolutely you can skim. (Lots of people deliberately prime in order to see the defects that might not be obvious.) If you can, use topping mud, which will sand more easily and give a better feathered edge than all purpose mud.


4

If you want the boards to look brand spanking new again, you will want to go with method one. I'd use a heat gun to do it, and not the harsh chemical strippers. Either method takes about as long as the other and the heat gun method is less toxic, and, you either already have a heat gun and don't need to spend money, or you'll buy one and have it for a long ...


4

You didnt have to use a mop, for next time all you have to do is take a broom to it and sweep the dust off, put some primer on, wait for it to dry and then take a pole sander to it, and dust clumps left on the wall is forever gone.


4

Yes you can overcoat the primer with more joint compound. If you have some left just use that, but if you need to purchase more consider topping mud. Topping mud is made for feathering places like you have and it sands just a bit easier. In either case standard joint compound or topping mud will work on a primed surface. Remember to prime the freshly mudded ...


4

It's a shame your contractor couldn't follow directions. Check to see if the paint he used contained a primer, many paints out there now do. The primer you purchased can be applied over latex paint so you could still use it over the painted ceiling and then repaint it.


3

You should prime it first. Primer is essential to get good adhesion and coverage. If you're really trying to avoid applying two coats, the next best thing would be a paint + primer combo.


3

TSP and a sponge mop. Wash the walls once with a TSP solution, then again with clean water to remove any soapy residue. This stuff really works, so that means if you've sensitive skin, wear those big rubber cleaning gloves.


3

I've used BIN primer with great success in the past. The reason the can says to use under a high-hiding paint or to prime the whole surface is so the primer doesn't show through. Say you have some unpainted, knotty wood and you spot prime the knots. When the whole board is painted, the spots where the primer is will be very obvious since they are bright ...


3

I'd consider any color that's darker than the gray primer itself to be better suited to gray primer. It's not just about color hiding, but also edge exposure. If you prime with white and then paint a dark or bold color, it's possible that fringe white will show where you've masked, etc.


3

For painting over previously painted surfaces you do NOT need primer. High quality primers do not hide colors very well because they are designed to adhere to a raw surface and typically do not carry many "solids" to cover. In fact the highest build and cost primer we use turns almost clear when it dries. I also suspect one coat of paint will not give you ...


3

You can absolutely mud over cured primer. (Or cured finish paint, for that matter.) Use all purpose mud (not a setting compound) and scuff the primer gently with 120 grit.


3

You can hide the color with paint or you can hide the color with primer. In general, primer is cheaper than paint so on "color changes" you want to do as much as you can with primer - even to the point of tinting your primer if you're not using white paint. So, I would go ahead and use another coat of primer and then paint over it with the final color. ...


3

This is mostly a matter of opinion. You'll usually get a better (more uniform) result if you do things edge-to-edge or corner-to-corner, including primer. The undercoat can have a significant effect on the sheen (and sometimes the color) of the topcoat. Another consideration is lighting. If the room has few windows and low lighting, the ceiling finish will ...


3

As far as I can tell the primary purpose of a primer is to identify areas that need more work. Primers are generally easy to sand to allow you to fix these problem areas. Anytime I talk to my rep at sherwin williams they seem to indicate that you can use an initial coat of any paint as a primer. The initial coat will seal up substrates. Using a paint as ...


3

Primer is generally used for one or more of these reasons. If they apply, use it. If you're unsure, use it. Save cost (cheap sealing and color/texture uniformity coat) Improve adhesion over glossy or dirty surfaces Block stains


3

If you try to lay a topcoat over an inconsistent surface, the inconsistencies will "print through" and give an inconsistent result. Look at what you have there, you have a dog's breakfast of colors and surfaces. Different colors, stripper-etched vs normal, stains, and whatever that caulking or filling material is. (you're in trouble if it's ...


3

Yep. Tint is completely optional as a measure to cover existing paint or prepare for new color.


2

I would strongly suggest the walls are primed and use a mold inhibitor behind the cabinetry, especially behind the sink cabinet and where the dishwasher will set. Raw drywall should be sealed before anything is installed against it in my opinion.


2

You'll have some waste with spraying. Considerably more than with a brush or roller, anyhow. Find the square footage---both sides---and divide 325 into it. You'll get about that amount, 325 square feet per gallon, if you're careful. You will likely need more than one coat… Also, make sure the surface has been well prepared by removing loose paint and ...


2

You need to make sure whatever you use is a "DTM" primer - direct-to-metal. The instructions on the can are usually awful, so you should check out the manufacturer's website. If you're using the right primer and having adhesion issues, the most common cause is probably not prepping the surface properly before applying the primer. Usually you need to wash ...


2

It is always a good idea to sand before painting, though that is one way to do the prep work. De-glossers will prepare the surface too, although I have no experience in this type of prep. The name brand cleaner will not dull the surface, but it will help in the surface prep. If there is soot present, this is good to remove that, then sand or de-gloss. If ...


2

Definitely spray, especially since you don't have to cover anything, and the area is large. This is based on my experience spraying walls and ceilings at our home over 40 years. I find spraying to be kind of fun because it goes on so fast. And I like how smooth the surface is after it's sprayed. That being said, I've also learned (the hard way) to test the ...


2

Spray and roll, more commonly called spray and backroll around me is when you spray the paint on and then another person follows behind you with a roller to roll the freshly spread paint. One of the reasons to do it is to get more even coverage in textured ceilings. It's easier to do with two people so if it's just you might just want to skip the sprayer to ...


2

Depends on if you want it to look good or not. If you don't care just go to local big box and grab a can of spray paint - I use the rustoleum auto body primer for any metals. Then I go over it will whatever type of spray paint - usually a bronze or satin finish. If you don't sand it you will have rust bubbles in your paint and unless you use an obnoxious ...


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