25

Pressure treated wood can handle submersion. Many folks just pack rock around the post, so they are always in water after rain. You should be fine to go ahead and pour your concrete with no worries.


17

Pressure-treated lumber is pressure-treated by... wait for it... submersion. It was literally dunked in a vat of liquid. The vat was sealed and pressurized, forcing the liquid to enter the wood. It was then not kiln dried. Your lumber is in roughly the same condition it was in when you purchased it. Also, it would have been just as wet even if there had ...


11

This should be a good starter project, here are a few tips I've picked up over the years: Even pressure treated wood will deteriorate over time if it's exposed or in direct contact with the ground/moisture. Do what you can to protect it from the elements and get it raised off of the soil. Use a moisture barrier between wood and concrete. Take care to ...


10

You have to cut the wood somehow... You can give your blades a wipedown with a slightly damp rag to remove sawdust particles (let them air-dry well afterward), but I wouldn't worry too much. Corrosion involving PT lumber is mostly a problem with long-term contact; the copper compounds in the chemical treatment are more "galvanically noble" than many common ...


8

Unless you have a kiln to dry wood in, drying wood in a standard environment takes a really long time (if you buy firewood, usually you want ~2yr old wood!). I don't know that leaving it out for a couple weeks would dry it if it were so saturated that there is visible water coming out of it. It is recommended to let wood used for hardwoods sit a couple ...


7

A lot depends on why you want the fence and how much room you have. Driving around Southern Ontario, I can easily see cedar rail fences that are over 100 years old, unmaintained, and have not fallen down. They don't even have posts! Cedar just won't rot, and they were constructed to be stable, let the wind and snow through, and endure. They take up a ton of ...


7

In general, the codes require fasteners to be of hot-dipped, zinc-coated galvanized steel in accordance with ASTM A153, type 304 or 316 stainless steel, silicon bronze or copper. [source] FWIW, everything you ever wanted to know about pressure treated wood here.


5

It's beneficial. Here in Texas, where it is humid and wet and we also have a lot of ground-based termites, I use TimBor for posts and rot sills in fences. The problem is, you want to have put that treatment on the wood before it goes in the concrete. At this point, your best method of preventing termites from getting into the structural portions of your ...


5

It's always good to inspect your deck every year after winter. Check for any loosening fasteners, any signs of rot, check for mold, and inspect places where wood meets wood. I would advise against an annual power-washing. It is extremely harsh on the wood, even if done by a professional. It requires a lot of work to restore the surface, as the pressure ...


5

A concrete post/form in the ground with some sort of above ground post or embedded post in the concrete is the way to go. Depending on what you want from your fence, ie: privacy, security, looks, etc. will effect what kind of materials to use for the actual visible fence. There are many choices of composite materials and vinyl products out there that are ...


5

I literally buy pressure-treated wood sight-unseen. I live near a chain of lumber yards that offers convenient delivery at a reasonable price. They offer pressure-treated fence posts with a consistent quality level, which is appropriate for my uses of the lumber. I can call them up, ask for a number of fence posts cut to a particular length, and arrange ...


4

It really depends on your surroundings and climatic conditions.I think the pressure treated timber posts concreted into the ground are good to go.You just have to follow these simple steps while installation: Remember the 1/3 rule while installing the post: that is 1/3 of the post length should be buried. STEP 1 Dig the hole widening out at the bottom. A ...


4

You may not use electro-galvanized bolts for ledger or joist-beam attachments. See IRC 502.2.2.1. Hot dipped or stainless steel only. Electro-plated is also not appropriate for contact with treated lumber. It may be that the bolts you listed are hot-dipped, but usually those magic words are listed, due to the code requirements.


4

Interior? Exterior? I'll assume exterior, since you're even considering pressure-treated wood. Cedar generally stands up to weathering considerably better than untreated pine does - hence the cedar siding & roofing all across the USA, but treated pine weathers reasonably well, too. It does like to split a little. Either will require careful priming with ...


4

Leave it exposed to the elements. You're not doing it any favors by sealing it with plastic. In fact, you'll run the risk of staining it by trapping moisture and/or fostering mildew and other grossness. It's better to let it dry out gradually over the winter and have it seasoned and ready for sealing in the spring. It may fade or gray out slightly, but the ...


3

Stainless is the most reliable way to go, though hot-dipped galvanized is also an option. It wasn't an issue until CCA was phased out a few years back.


3

Wolmanized wood is a subsection of pressure treated wood. There are many different processes that fall in the preserved wood category and Wolmanized wood used a copper azole process. It is manufactured by Arch wood products.


3

The answer is simply No. PT wood will warp if you let it sit. It would have to be in an ultra controlled environment to dry and not warp horribly.


3

I usually nail them together. Construction adhesive won't be enough. You could use screws also. For spacing I usually start by making sure the crown is going the same direction and at one end put 2 in within a few inches top and bottom, then at 6" away from those put another nail on the top an inch from edge another 6" one an inch from the bottom another 6"...


3

@jasper has a good answer, but to address the actual "standing in the store" side of things... First, know what you need in a board. Do you need the entire length, or are you going to be nipping some off? Do you need it to be straight? Do you need something that's more dry or more wet? Do the faces have to look nice or will anything do? With the above in ...


2

Wet wood is common when considering the PT stuff. Although not as easy to find, but there is such a thing as KDAT wood (kiln dried after treatment). You should consider the project and for things that will be exposed to the weather or high humidity, wet wood is OK, just heavy to work with. Two years of drying would only be required if you are building ...


2

+1 on the stainless fasteners. TheSean, you're actually working with that pressure-treated lumber in its IDEAL condition for working. After it dries, it'll become much much harder & more prone to splitting. Right now it's very resilient, and every fastener you drive into it "wet" will become tighter as the wood dries out. Too, dried PT lumber will give ...


2

It probably depends on how much effort you're going to be putting into it. If you're just planning on slapping something together quickly, then sure, go for untreated, and if something goes wrong, you can rebuild it in a couple of years. I'd personally use pressure treated, as I'd have to make a larger structure due to local ordinances. (I can't store ...


2

Hegde post or a live fence is made out of living trees and or shrubs that are manipulated into a hedge. Once established they can last a lifetime. They just need to be pruned two to three times a year which creates a good source of mulch. All fences need maintenance however. That just comes with the territory. http://www.motherearthnews.com/homesteading-...


2

I'll tell you what I did, following the boys on "Ask This Old House": Pressure treated posts, 10' Hole dug with power awl to 4' plus a few inches Pea gravel in the hole bottom Set post on pea gravel and adjust height with more pea gravel Begin filling around post with pea gravel, tamping down frequently with big steel stick Fill with pea gravel to within a ...


2

It will not last long (7 yrs max) if the bottom of the post is wet. If you place stone at the base of the post, it should last 20+ yrs.


2

The quick answer is both/neither. You want pressure treated for any lumber that is exposed to the elements, especially moisture from rain or the ground. And you want the fence posts in concrete. The rule of thumb is 2/3 above ground, 1/3 below, so a 6' fence should be at least 3' in the ground. For the concrete, flair out the bottom of the hole to prevent ...


2

Pressure treated wood should be dried out before painting. 3 monthes - a year depending on climate. I would go with a good primer first before painting. Use floor paint for floor or just go with a solid stain.


2

If you already bought (and can't return) 8 foot wooden posts and you want a 7 foot high fence (or "at least 7 feet") I would suggest not burying them at all, as that's doomed to failure. Put metal post bases (or metal posts) in the ground and bolt your wooden posts to them. Otherwise buy 10 or 12 foot wooden posts if you want 7-8 feet above ground and you ...


2

You can sit the rails (or beams) right on the piers and level them using shims. That bracket is used for vertical mounting columns.


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