25

Pressure treated wood can handle submersion. Many folks just pack rock around the post, so they are always in water after rain. You should be fine to go ahead and pour your concrete with no worries.


17

Pressure-treated lumber is pressure-treated by... wait for it... submersion. It was literally dunked in a vat of liquid. The vat was sealed and pressurized, forcing the liquid to enter the wood. It was then not kiln dried. Your lumber is in roughly the same condition it was in when you purchased it. Also, it would have been just as wet even if there had ...


7

In general, the codes require fasteners to be of hot-dipped, zinc-coated galvanized steel in accordance with ASTM A153, type 304 or 316 stainless steel, silicon bronze or copper. [source] FWIW, everything you ever wanted to know about pressure treated wood here.


5

I literally buy pressure-treated wood sight-unseen. I live near a chain of lumber yards that offers convenient delivery at a reasonable price. They offer pressure-treated fence posts with a consistent quality level, which is appropriate for my uses of the lumber. I can call them up, ask for a number of fence posts cut to a particular length, and arrange ...


5

In my state the bottom plate is required to have the foam seal and treated lumber for external load bearing walls only. I do use foam internally but not treated lumber. The foam prevents moisture from wicking into the plate and rotting it. I do use the foam inside but more often I will use tarpaper as I usually have a roll and it works well and is cheaper ...


5

The pier and footing is the best approach. A structure, even a deck or pavilion should not have to rely upon the posts being anchored in concrete for structural support. The pavilion itself should be planned and supported to be structurally sound in itself regardless of the type of footing used. If properly installed with an anchored metal post base the ...


4

You may not use electro-galvanized bolts for ledger or joist-beam attachments. See IRC 502.2.2.1. Hot dipped or stainless steel only. Electro-plated is also not appropriate for contact with treated lumber. It may be that the bolts you listed are hot-dipped, but usually those magic words are listed, due to the code requirements.


4

Interior? Exterior? I'll assume exterior, since you're even considering pressure-treated wood. Cedar generally stands up to weathering considerably better than untreated pine does - hence the cedar siding & roofing all across the USA, but treated pine weathers reasonably well, too. It does like to split a little. Either will require careful priming with ...


4

+1 on the stainless fasteners. TheSean, you're actually working with that pressure-treated lumber in its IDEAL condition for working. After it dries, it'll become much much harder & more prone to splitting. Right now it's very resilient, and every fastener you drive into it "wet" will become tighter as the wood dries out. Too, dried PT lumber will give ...


4

The answer is simply No. PT wood will warp if you let it sit. It would have to be in an ultra controlled environment to dry and not warp horribly.


4

Leave it exposed to the elements. You're not doing it any favors by sealing it with plastic. In fact, you'll run the risk of staining it by trapping moisture and/or fostering mildew and other grossness. It's better to let it dry out gradually over the winter and have it seasoned and ready for sealing in the spring. It may fade or gray out slightly, but the ...


4

I've been involved directly and indirectly with home construction since the 1980s. Here in Minnesota, bottom plates, window bucks, sill plates, and anything else in direct contact with concrete (or even separated by foam "sill seal") have been pressure-treated by code and convention for decades. You're right that warpage is a problem. Keep the treated ...


3

Stainless is the most reliable way to go, though hot-dipped galvanized is also an option. It wasn't an issue until CCA was phased out a few years back.


3

Wet wood is common when considering the PT stuff. Although not as easy to find, but there is such a thing as KDAT wood (kiln dried after treatment). You should consider the project and for things that will be exposed to the weather or high humidity, wet wood is OK, just heavy to work with. Two years of drying would only be required if you are building ...


3

I usually nail them together. Construction adhesive won't be enough. You could use screws also. For spacing I usually start by making sure the crown is going the same direction and at one end put 2 in within a few inches top and bottom, then at 6" away from those put another nail on the top an inch from edge another 6" one an inch from the bottom another 6"...


3

@jasper has a good answer, but to address the actual "standing in the store" side of things... First, know what you need in a board. Do you need the entire length, or are you going to be nipping some off? Do you need it to be straight? Do you need something that's more dry or more wet? Do the faces have to look nice or will anything do? With the above in ...


3

That is natural aging , the most rot resistant wood redwood turns gray within 5 years , cedar within 3 and that’s in Oregon. If you stain it a color or paint it it will hide the aging but this is normal with most any wool product, pressure treating keeps it from rotting not aging.


2

Hegde post or a live fence is made out of living trees and or shrubs that are manipulated into a hedge. Once established they can last a lifetime. They just need to be pruned two to three times a year which creates a good source of mulch. All fences need maintenance however. That just comes with the territory. http://www.motherearthnews.com/homesteading-...


2

Pressure treated wood should be dried out before painting. 3 monthes - a year depending on climate. I would go with a good primer first before painting. Use floor paint for floor or just go with a solid stain.


2

All PT lumber comes wet. They put it under pressure and force chemicals into it. Then they palletize it tightly so it won't warp in transit and ship it. I usually lay the boards out on a flat surface stacked up in criss cross layers with air space between each board. I put some cinder blocks on top to keep the top layers from warping. In the summer in ...


2

If you already bought (and can't return) 8 foot wooden posts and you want a 7 foot high fence (or "at least 7 feet") I would suggest not burying them at all, as that's doomed to failure. Put metal post bases (or metal posts) in the ground and bolt your wooden posts to them. Otherwise buy 10 or 12 foot wooden posts if you want 7-8 feet above ground and you ...


2

Offgassing has never really been a concern with treated lumber. Direct skin contact and ingestion were concerns with CCA treatment, and to a lesser degree with the products that have replaced it. As long as you're not spending a lot of time in contact with wet wood, and as long as your pets and family members aren't gnawing on it, I wouldn't be concerned.


2

You can sit the rails (or beams) right on the piers and level them using shims. That bracket is used for vertical mounting columns.


2

It shouldn't be too difficult to pull that bow out, and the screws should hold it in place. I'd use a rope with a cinch loop or a ratchet strap to pull it all together, then run your screws in. Seeing as you're pulling from end-grain you may have a hard time doing it with just screws. They might strip.


2

Copper Naphthenate is the stuff I use it looks like a green stain , now o days the % is much lower than in years past so I will apply several coats if in contact with earth but for rails and things not touching earth 1 coat works fine. Edited for correct chemical thanks Jimmy


2

Most building codes require PT wood that will be in contact with basement concrete floors. So the bottom plate of a 2x4 wall and code requires the use of fasteners (galvanized) approved for use with PT wood.


2

Pressure-treated lumber should last longer. Any preservative applied to untreated wood would only affect the surface to a few mm inside, so would have to be reapplied more frequently.


2

Stainless steel is more brittle than the steel commonly used for screws. In some cases I have twisted off long ss screws. This may be a critical deficiency in some applications. I use stainless steel exclusively for installing grab bars in showers. These are ss screws which come with the bars. In dry situations I use whatever I have except never drywall ...


2

Treated wood doesn't always twist/warp/shrink, but in my experience more often than not it will to some degree. For something small like window planter boxes etc. I would use non-treated lumber and stain or paint with a quality exterior grade product. Obviously if the project is a deck or similar structure subjected to the inevitable wrath of Mother Nature ...


2

Those are galvanized. The texture says it all. Those different dark and light spots of silver all over the nail are crystals created as the zinc quickly cools in the air. Take a look at the image below and at this article by the American Galvanizer Association. https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://galvanizeit.org/uploads/...


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