15

Here's how you get paint to stick to things. Scuff-sand. Paint cannot bond to a shiny surface; don't take my word on it, try to paint a mirror and see what happens. Paint wants to see a surface that looks like Swiss Alps on a microscopic level - lots of jaggies and crevasses for paint to flow into and bond in shear. To human eyes, that doesn't look ...


13

Any home improvement centre sells two essential things for this: painter's tape and plastic sheeting. Buy a thin plastic for the walls, and thicker one for the floor (or, better yet, use drop cloth for the floor). Buy wide painter's tape, it's much easier to use it to attach plastic sheets to walls, shower doors, etc. Tape and cover everything. There will ...


10

If you want a really nice job, get a drywall pole sander and give the wall a quick going over with 200-250 grit paper before priming, and before your final colour coat. Remember to wipe with a damp rag (use the pole sander if you like) before applying any paint/primer.


7

I have fixed paint similar to this in my current house. There were large areas where I could peel it off back to the plaster by hand or with a scraper. Your builder's first coat has failed to adhere to the plaster and now it's peeling off. This could have been caused by: Painting with full strength paint rather than a mist coat Painting before the plaster ...


6

There's one tip that was completely missed, and should have been at the start: When painting over a surface that has had to be repaired or was very dirty (scrub it clean first), get both the paint and the primer tinted to the same color. As long as you buy the paint/primer in the same brand and they are both the same base, you will have exact match. This ...


5

It makes me die a little inside when people paint over raw red brick.... That said, you tape and paper the walls where they meet the brick. Then you plastic from the paper as far out as you think you might overspray. You may even want to form a "curtain" out of the plastic to keep the brick in a make-shift paint booth. It is just as you would mask any ...


5

EDIT: Comments above say that you have 1-2" of water. There is no solution for this other than fixing the drain. (Or going to marine style doors with a raised threshold.) What I've describe below can mitigate minor flooding, but won't help with the serious issue you seem to be having. ORIGINAL ANSWER: The proper long term answer is to fix the the drain....


4

You didnt have to use a mop, for next time all you have to do is take a broom to it and sweep the dust off, put some primer on, wait for it to dry and then take a pole sander to it, and dust clumps left on the wall is forever gone.


3

One paint company defines the various finishes as follows: Satin: A finish with a low luster appearance. Washable surface, reflects some light. Semi-Gloss: A finish that has noticable gloss and sheen. Washable, sometimes scrubbable surface, but shows surface imperfections. Reflects light noticeably Eggshell / Low Gloss: A finish ½ way between ...


3

I'd suggest a quality primer (Killz would be a good brand) and then a high-gloss latex, perhaps with an anti-mildew additive (most paint departments will have anti-mildew bases designed for high moisture areas).


3

Overspray can be managed with masking on the sides with kraft paper made explicitly for this purpose. For floors and / or large wall areas you can also use poly plastic that comes on large rolls with the plastic up to 12 feet wide


3

HVAC Open cold air returns Prep humidifier: Open intake, turn on water, set thermostat Change furnace filter Test furnace Electrical Shut off A/C circuit breaker If you have baseboard heaters, turn on any circuit breakers, test heaters Do you have a generator? Does it start? Do you have a plan to connect it if needed? Outside Clean out my garage so I ...


3

TSP and a sponge mop. Wash the walls once with a TSP solution, then again with clean water to remove any soapy residue. This stuff really works, so that means if you've sensitive skin, wear those big rubber cleaning gloves.


3

This is a subjective question, but ideally any paint that's not well-bonded should be removed. Eventually it'll flake off as well. That said, there's always a balancing act to be done. You'll have to assess the situation and proceed accordingly. It may not be economically practical to strip the paint entirely, depending on intended lifetime of the siding, ...


3

Based on what I've seen in the pictures I'd say you have two option: 1) get a sander and sand the entire deck or 2) get two gallons of stain remover and spray in on the entire deck and scrape it all off. Deck stains are most durable when applied to wood and coating new stain over bare wood and then wood with old stain won't give you the results you want. ...


2

You can mix some of your paint with the primer to tint it to the final color hue. This has always worked for me. This is a good method if the paint change is a drastic one.


2

Ok. What I've found when transitioning from one wall color to another is not tinting the primer to the top coat but rather tinting the primer to neutral gray. I've done it both ways and, for some reason, (probably what parts of the spectrum gets reflected, what gets absorbed) the neutral gray (photographers among us, think 18% gray card...) allows fewer ...


2

I picked up a mop with a wringable, rectangular sponge head from the drug store. What I did was get it wet and wring it out to dampness. After taking it from the ceiling to the floor and stepping to the side a bit to repeat, I'd be able to get about three sweeps of the wall before the head looked like it needed to be wrung out again. I did all walls and ...


2

You could take a proactive approach and sand it in any case. This will lead to better paint adhesion which is a good thing. It is also a great idea to wash previously painted surfaces with a strong solution of TSP (tri sodium phosphate). Make sure to use good rubber gloves and hot water - for your protection and best results. The TSP wash does a fantastic ...


2

You'll have some waste with spraying. Considerably more than with a brush or roller, anyhow. Find the square footage---both sides---and divide 325 into it. You'll get about that amount, 325 square feet per gallon, if you're careful. You will likely need more than one coat… Also, make sure the surface has been well prepared by removing loose paint and ...


2

Cut slots in the concrete close together with an angle grinder and diamond blade, knock off the little ridges you have just created, and then either flatten with a cup grinder or level up with compound.


2

Depending on the paint you bought, you may be able to add lime which is a mold inhibitor due to its pH. If you can still return the paint, making your own milk paint (aka casein paint) at home is an option. Milk paint has the property of being a natural mold inhibitor if done correctly. Numerous recipes (and youtube videos) can be found online with a quick ...


2

The first step would be to strip off as much of the old paint as possible. The best way I've found to do this on stucco or concrete is to use a wire brush bit in an electric drill. Second (and most important), it looks like you have some areas with significant cracks in them, so you'll also want to repair or fill the cracks in order to prevent them from ...


2

check your home warranty clauses so you are intimately familiar with them ask your neighbors (assuming you have some, and after you give them a bottle of wine as a welcome) if they have had any flood / foundation / insect-pest / neighborhood problems check city regulations for parking and other municipal restrictions contact Homeowners' Association for rules ...


2

To expand a little on haimg's answer. Cover the floor first, even extending the covering up the walls a little to catch spills. Then cover the walls. The most important step, is prepping the surface to be painted. Scrap and sand any rough spots. Use a cleaner, such as borax or TSP to clean any residues. Patch holes using a plaster material. Not rubber ...


2

"Liquid Sand Paper" is a diluted form of the solvent used in gloss paints in the first place, Diethylene glycol monobutyl ether (DEG monobutyl ether). It also contains fine grains of silica (quartz) in suspension. It works by slightly dissolving the surface of the gloss paint and allowing the silica grains to embed themselves in it, which then allows the ...


1

Glass tile on wallboard presents no special challenge. Glass tile on plaster is ok also, as long as it is not too uneven. You'll need trim on the top and bottom to make the transition look good. Also as @HerrBag alludes in the comments, glass tile is harder to get right compared to opaque tile.


1

I doubt there'd be any problems. After all, when the moisture resistant paint was first put on, more than one coat would have been used, therefore it is possible to paint over it. Just make sure you give the wall a good clean (i.e. use sugar soap) before putting the new paint on.


1

You should try to get things that have height off your floor. A little glue stained on your floor, paint, stuff like that - won't hurt anything. The thinset will bind to that just as good as the concrete. So you want to make sure anything sticking up is scraped and anything that is loose. Leveling is not a must. Most basements slant towards the drain....


1

Re: the doors solid wood or thin hollow core doors? Weight when unhung and picked up will tell. Also deflection when pressing pretty hard in the center section will reveal a hollow core door if still hung on it's hinges. If you want to strip a wooden door and it is solid wood, sanding through the stain and paint is the way to go as you can start with 80G ...


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