New answers tagged

2

I have a powered caulking gun and I have found it not useful for caulking. It's difficult to control and doesn't seem to stop on cue like a nice manual one. However it's fantastic if you use large amounts of adhesive. For example I used over 200 tubes of green glue when I did my home theater room and the power gun made it an absolute breeze. I imagine if you ...


2

Even with consistent pressure pushing the caulk out of the tube, inconsistent movement speed will also result in an uneven bead. In fact, for me personally it is always a result of not being able to move quick enough that results in an uneven and sloppy bead. Whenever I have free movement and an open space, that bead will be even and clean. If I'm confined, ...


0

I love my power tools (and do use both of my routers!), but I'm not sure i would bother with a powered caulk gun unless you do a LOT of caulking. Instead, maybe consider a manual gun with adjustable leverage ratio, which will give you more options for matching the accuracy and required strength to each job...


3

I take it by the fact that you linked to an eBay item that Weller quit the rotary tool business. Okay then. Fortunately, they were competing with the Dremel, which is basically the "household name" for that type of tool. I bet yours is equivalent with a 1/8” arbor and similar speeds. (You can test that by putting a 1/8” drill bit in it, if it ...


2

Dremel tools are high quality and go up to 35000 rpm. I would get their wire brushes which are available in many sizes, shapes and materials.


1

What to look for: It will have a firm attachment to the tool, and the number of RPM will be 28000 or higher. Tools for these mini die grinders tend to have 1/8" shank or 1/8" hole so ignore the quarter inch ones, they are for full size die grinders.


2

With the small SDS drill the wall tiles went off like a dream. The floor tiles were thicker than usual, and placed not in tile adhesive, but mortar. The small drill was not enough to remove them in reasonable time. After realizing that the underfloor must also be replaced, I left that work to a contractor, who sent me two rugged man and some of Hilti's ...


0

I'd seriously consider making the jump from "just a power screwdriver" to a full-blown drill/driver. There are a lot of them out there. My recommendation is to pick one of the major house brands (e.g., Ryobi from Home Depot) or a major brand (e.g., Dewalt) so that you can start with a drill/driver, one battery and charger (that's the typical ...


1

This is what I use: A speed wrench and a bit holder. You can press as hard as needed, you get crazy leverage, and it doesn't wear out your wrists. Tremendous torque and you can stop on a dime. Also, it lets me hold the drill back for use as a drill for pre-drilling holes. source


1

When navigating the cordless drivers/drills on the market, there are a several factors to consider. We assume that, in this day and age, not to mention COVID, you're shopping online and don't actually see the tool until it's delivered and you opened the box. The voltage Is it a 4V unit, a 12V unit, or a 20V unit? The torque you obtain from the first (<50 ...


Top 50 recent answers are included