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1

It is really a function of the chuck and the gearing in it. I have a 1/2" DeWalt hammer drill which will crush bits super tight. A lighter duty drill driver does not clamp down as much on the bits. I like keyed chucks, but find little reason to stick with them when replacing a chuck on a drill. The keyless ones are usually quite adequate for the ...


0

If you have it apart, I would place a single drop of machine oil (I use a spindle oil, which I also use in the SO's quilting machine) on the rear bearing. Don't let it get on the brushes. I have a Craftsman drill I bought in 1969, and still use from time to time. A drop of oil every 5 or 10 years served it well. The gearbox was readily serviceable, and ...


3

I have both a Bosch rotary hammer and a DeWalt rotary hammer drill. The Bosch instructions say to apply grease from time to time on the bits. Bosch even includes a small tube of grease. DeWalt instructions never mention adding grease to the bit. When the DeWalt was factory new, a bit inserted came out with a light coating of grease. So I asked at the (now ...


0

The 'impact driver' is for drilling holes in concrete more easily. It's not for screwing in screws! There may be a switch to turn off the impact action, in which case, voila! If not you can try by all means, but most screwheads will get damaged by its action.


0

Some, but not all, impact drivers can also run in a non-impact mode. If it can do that, great. If it can't then don't try - you will ruin the screws and/or the wood.


1

I have seen people use the impact drill for screws, they tend to deform the screw heads so that you cannot remove the screws later. For drywall that's irrelevant, for assembling something with wood, it might be. But... Drywall screws are not a good choice for wood anyway, the shafts are thinner and weaker, because for drywall, you don't need the screws to be ...


1

Not sure product recommendations are on-topic here, but DeWalt does make a 20V Flexvolt series product called the Portable Power Station DCB1800 which can supply 120VAC @ 15A. It also functions as a charger for your batteries. It's not cheap, though.


1

Some angle grinders, such as the DeWalt model that I have, come with three different sizes of guards. I have not measured them but I believe they support 4", 5" and 6" grinding wheels. The down side I see using a bigger guard than the size of the wheel is that it will be like working with a wheel that is nearly worn out compared to the larger ...


2

Get yourself a coarse rasp from your home store. It's a really, really coarse file and is great for removing a lot of wood in a short time. it has a curved and a flat surface. (picture from Amazon)


3

Do you have a saw? Any sort of saw, be it hand saw, circular saw, hand or power miter box. These are all appropriate tools for squaring up an end like this. Even a jig-saw with a long enough blade should get you a cut that's close enough to finish sand. An angle grinder would not be a good tool for this, which is probably why you're not finding any wood ...


2

I actually have the same question. I recently bought Blue Max bandsaw tires and out of the package the rough side was out. Also on a YouTube video where Blue Max tires were being installed it looked like the smooth side was against the wheel. It is my guess that with Blue Max at least the rough side is out. Hope this helps.


-1

The only reason those rings exist is to provide one with a means of operating the tool using a blade with a bigger accepting hole diameter than the thinner, less girthy in circumference acceptor shaft If the tool you plan to operate the blade inside, preventing centrifugal forces from borking the rotational integrity of the blade and causing it to spin like ...


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