70

Your grinder is a Class-II Double Insulated appliance and therefore does not require a ground/earth connection. But even if you did decide to fit a 3-pin plug, what would you connect the 3rd pin to? There's no 3rd wire in the cord, nor is there a ground point in the device to connect it to.


32

The filling is melted aluminum that galled/melted and filled the gullet and is covering one of the Tungsten Carbide teeth. You can pull it off with a pliers. The negative rake angle of the blade is fine for cutting aluminum, it will push your workpiece away instead of tending to grab onto it. It will generate more heat and be more likely to melt the ...


23

The technique is called double-switching. According to this article, on AC equipment the technique is used to avoid dangerous conditions when hot and neutral are reversed, as often happens with outlets that have been improperly wired. It is permitted by this exception in NEC 404.2(B): 404.2(B) Grounded Conductors. Switches or circuit breakers shall not ...


20

It is double insulated. Your prior one wasn't so its case had to be grounded. Look for the square in the square icon on the name plate of the device: You will not be any safer if you replace the plug.


18

Yes the J shape is supposed to be there for expansion. If you look at a Diablo blade it has the J relief cuts at the edges and also d-shaped relief cuts within the body of the blade. The large tooth looks like it may be build up of aluminum on the carbide tooth. It definitely doesn't look like carbide. If it is Aluminum it should be easy to pull off with a ...


18

For cutting locks, nothing beats an angle grinder. Good locks are all made with hardened steel that should be as hard as any metal cutting blade for a saw. The reciprocating saw will be able to make a little progress into the shackle, but its speed will dull the blade quickly, and once it's even a little dull, it will stop cutting and melt/grind the teeth ...


17

The problem with 'All-rounder' tools is that they are rarely actually very good at anything. Sure they'll let you cut a wavy line in tile, but how often will you be doing this? My advice would be to buy good-quality tools as, and when, you need them. An SDS drill, battery drill-driver, and decent hand-saw will get you a long way. If you'll be cutting sheet ...


15

It depends on what you're cutting, why you're cutting it, and what type of cuts you're making. Long Straight Cuts When it comes to long straight cuts, a table saw is the best in the business. Set the fence, turn it on, and it'll cut the same width pieces forever. With a band saw (or most other saws), you'll be looking at using some type of jig for long ...


14

An ordinary electric drill does not have the speed of the Dremel (30,000 rpm) which is the key to getting the best results from many of the accessories. Also, the Dremel tool is much smaller and lighter than an electric drill which is very useful in many applications such as carving, etching and working with small work pieces. Dremels can be used with non-...


14

Probable reason: they made ONE saw assembly and used a motor that could be configured as 110 or 220. For 220 you would break both lines, for 110 you don't need to, but there is nothing saying you can't (so long as your switch breaks both lines together), so it's just easier to have everything the same.


13

While I appreciate this isn't an answer to the question, I'd like to point out that power tool safety is as much a state of mind as anything. All saws (with the possible exception of the sawstop and similar systems) can bite you, and correspondingly, all saws can be used safely. So, my advice is to learn from experts how to use your chosen saw. Don't slip ...


13

The issue here is voltage drop in the circuit supplying the saw. The saw's motor has an optimal voltage range, and will not run well if the voltage is too low. The voltage drops over the length of the extension cord; the longer the cord, the greater the drop. However, a heavier gauge cord will have less voltage drop than a lighter gauge cord. (Voltage ...


11

Your hedge trimmer sounds like it has died or is in the process of dying. A quick google search confirms that this can occur with Black & Decker hedge trimmers, although it does not appear to be wide spread. Because you didn't provide the model it isn't possible to give you a more specific reason why it has failed. My opinion is that when you were having ...


11

No Your multitool does not have a Starlock mount. But some Starlock blades are compatible nonetheless. Starlock Starlock has three types of blades: Starlock regular, Starlock Plus, and Starlock Max. The latter are more sturdy. All Starlock blades are 3D-curved; they have a bulge. The three sub-types differ only in the cutouts. DTM51 is not Starlock Your ...


9

The most likely solution is to create a template and use a router with a bit that follows the template. The router would also be used for easing over any sharp edges. photo credit, sample image, not a product recommendation


9

Make a piece of board that looks like the following with some small 0.1 to 0.2 inch thick strips glued to it. This board would be long enough that you can hold it safely near the belt sander. The pocket in the middle will be the periphery size of the small item that you want to sand. Stick a piece of double stick tape into the cavity bottom to hold your ...


9

Some other helpful hints (not from Heloise) 0) ALWAYS wear gloves and eye protection. (Note: if you're using one hand to hold down the material being drilled, a glove can reduce injury if the drill bit jams. On the other hand, you should never depend on body parts to hold things in place) 1) When drilling into soft material such as plastic or pine, ...


9

I do not know what "multi-tool" you are referring to. Best DIY all-rounder cutting tool for straight edges? It depends on what you are cutting and how long the cut is. There is not one tool that will do every job well. There are some tools that will do several jobs well and other jobs in a pinch if you do not have the correct tool. ( having the ...


7

This isn't something I would worry about at all. If you are a typically householder you don't use your driver 8 hours a day 5 days a week year after year after year. If you do, you should be buying a tool designed for professional use (which the DCD790 appears to be, judging by it's price). I'm just a householder and I find drills last me at least 10 years. ...


7

The Intermittent "sputtering" is sign of a loss of power going into the motor windings. there is pretty much only two ways this happens, A: there is a short somewhere (plug, cable or switch) or B: the contact brushes are dead. If mild shaking of the grinder added to the sputtering, I would say its the brushes. This is an easy fix, since you just need to get ...


7

As a woman who sharpens knives for a hobby, I always keep a pair of "fillet gloves" around. These are the gloves a lot of fishermen use when filleting their catch. The gloves are made with (to quote the manufacturer Rapella) "...A comfy blend of natural and synthetic fibers with stainless steel provides the best protection ever.... “ Although the gloves can ...


7

Looking at the Milwaukee web site the chuck capacity refers to the largest solid bit (hole diameter) the drill is capable of drilling. They are referring to using a solid bit not a hole saw. If you notice, that diameter increases as the power of the drill increases along with the price. That is not to say that you can't drill a hole larger than the rated ...


7

Especially within the same size class of saws (eg. 8.5", 10", 12") you will find that machines sometimes have blades which differ in size up to 5 mm / 1/5" (12": 300–305 mm, 10": 250–254 mm). For the less common sizes the size difference might be even more obscure: consider Mafell’s MT55 requirement for 162 mm blades, which is slightly smaller than 6-1/2" (...


7

Here's the relevant bit, which includes some liability tone: Your tool was properly lubricated before leaving the factory. In from two to six months, depending upon use, take or send your tool to an authorized service center for a complete cleaning, inspection and lubrication. Tools used constantly on production jobs will need relubrication more often....


7

While the other answer is correct in normal conditions - that is the purpose of the pin. I would use a bar that fits into the hole in that shaft and a properly fitting wrench as if it has been overtightened it will need some force to undo it. Using the normal mechanism relies on the strength of the aluminum casting which may break under these conditions. And ...


6

The answer depends on: hours used a day (lets assume 10) days used a week (assume 7) rate charged by your power company (assume 13 cents per kilowatt hour) Under these assumptions, the difference is about $500 a year. You can refer to the chart below if you want to change the hours, days, or rate.


6

Unless it came with a 20A plug (pictured below), it's designed to plug into a 15A receptacle. The 20A plug has one blade twisted 90 degrees to prevent it from being plugged into a 15A receptacle. The corresponding 20A receptacle has a slot shaped to accept a standard 15A plug or a 20A plug: This assumes that the plug on the snowthrower is factory installed ...


6

Gauge is the thickness of the drive tangs on the saw chain. Chain gauge must match the groove width on the bar. The only effect chain gauge will have on standard spur sprockets is the contact area it presents on the spur teeth, thicker gauge = wider contact area. Rim Sprockets use a pocket that must be wide enough to allow the drive tangs to seat. Pitch ...


6

Hand sand - it's a small, thin item...you can cut a sanding belt and lay it out on the edge of bench, or glue it to a board, and surf the item along it with your fingertips on top. Power sanding may save a few seconds if you never have to stop and apply bandages, but once you do, it's not faster in total. Clamp it with a block or fixture so that the item ...


6

Just some things I see on jobs all the time: Do not use a power drill (you want to keep mix things). You will blow out the motor in a good power drill by using it as a mixer. I see my guys use their Makitas with a mixing rod. And have seen many ruin them. I simply give them a 30 year old craftsman electric drill I have that I would give away for $5. It ...


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