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10

The post looks reasonably adequate as it was originally built even by modern standards. If it wasn't you'd have seen disaster long ago, when it first started to decay. To maintain the style detail I'd rebuild to match, using pressure-treated lumber. By doing so you eliminate the need to cut that notch and you end up with a more robust post. A single post ...


5

+1 option #4, plastic standoffs. "Any thoughts on the most robust way to anchor the posts?" You said you are renting and can not anchor. Take some five gallon buckets and mix up some cement, fill the buckets with the cement and put an eye bolt in so it stick out of the top. Put a nut and washer on the threaded part of the eye bolt that will be in the ...


3

Quikcrete makes fence post mix that does not require mixing, but after you pour the dry into the hole, you then soak it in with water. http://www.quikrete.com/AtHome/Video-Setting-Posts.asp You might want to enlarge a holes a bit.


3

Either will work. They'll both hold up a conventional roof of that size without issue. Your concern is more a matter of diagonal bracing, especially if the posts won't be in the ground.


2

I would say this home is C 1920. But I guess it could be built more recently like and older home. It's possible those columns are not so load bearing. The joists above the porch could be cantilevered. Like.. But even if load bearing I don't think it is that big of a deal. Just support them well under the porch. http://stairs4u.com/glossary/images/...


2

I think the Fence Bible described a method for putting a few inches of gravel at the bottom of the hole, resting the post on that for drainage, then pouring concrete.


2

Whether your concrete base will survive is irrelevant, because your beam will fail. See: https://www.amesweb.info/StructuralAnalysisBeams/Stresses_Steel_Hollow_Structural_Sections.aspx Input: Output: Notice the highlighted field of the output. That's the stress you'll be putting on the connection with the ground, (assuming it's rigid). The yield ...


2

That base goes into a hole drilled into a concrete slab, and is then attached with epoxy. The base of the bracket bears on the cured slab. Follow the epoxy manufacturer's instructions regarding hole clearance and cleaning procedure.


2

I have learned the hard way that it is not a good idea to use a PTO post hole digger with your tractor near trees. To avoid getting the auger stuck in tree roots, first dig with a shovel. If you find roots larger than 4 cm diameter, use a spade to clear the dirt from around the root as much as possible and then use a small chain saw to cut the roots on ...


2

The simplest solution here is to dig out a few inches around your existing concrete post footings and add additional concrete mix to the dug out area. If you do this now that the ground is dry you should be good-to-go for the longer term. Note that even though the post holes were originally 28" to 32" deep you would not really need to dig down that full ...


1

If the setting time is not an issue, you can certainly use normal quickcrete - or save even more money by purchasing cement and aggregate (sand/gravel/rock) and really making use of the mixer. Standard concrete mixing practice is to mix the dry materials and then add water. Common error is to add too much water and make the resulting concrete weak, though ...


1

What you're trying to do appears possible, with a few extra parts. See here (forgive the crappy art, I made several edits): The two red rectangles are the beam-post braces I would add (minimally) to handle the horizontal loads which can no longer be handled by your odd post. The post I drew where there isn't one is just a short floating section used to fix ...


1

I think it depends on your application. If it is inside and dry you can just push it all the way down. to prevent rot outside (or basement) I would leave a 1/4 inch (5mm) gap to allow the wood to dry out in case water collects under it. I assume you mean newly poured concrete. The steel is strong enough either way.


1

The tool of choice here is a jackhammer. Today's electric ones will do the job nicely. You should be able to rent one and a portable generator to power it from a local tool rental shop. They should be able to fix you up with the correct tool for the job.


1

Strong winds or heavy snow will destroy that structure as you currently have it planned (if it would even be able to support it's own roof). Imagine that this structure is not a structure, but a stool - if you sit on a stool where the legs are not tied together somewhere other than the top, the legs of the stool will want to push outward at the bottom, and ...


1

(Sorry I'm not Metric, we use 2x material) Dado out a wooden Post for the pole, then add a 2x to the side you dadoed out to cover it and screw it to the dadoed post and bolt the whole thing together Depending on the Diameter of the post, you can also wrap it in 2x. We have also done 2x6 Left to right (So you see the 2x6 face on the fence, I like 4x6 Fence ...


1

I have built 3 sheds using two 2X4 at each corner ( two were 8' X 12', one was 8' X 16' and 2 stories). I used 2 X 4 on 16" centers and 1/2 " plywood walls. None fell down or blew away. All were set on flat concrete or cement blocks. The compressive strength of southern pine is about 13,000 psi so using a design value of 5000 psi appears safe. As noted you ...


1

Not using graded lumber can get you in trouble. Or what I mean is using a lower grade than allowed for a residence. If you ever have an earthquake this could be an area that the insurance company says they won’t cover your loss. And you want to use material that is below grade 2 and specifically listed as not for structural. I would not have this prior to ...


1

I myself would prefer to replace it, as the crack/check goes down beyond the knot breakout or simply for aesthetics (compared to the treatment below). If that crack/check goes to the bottom or within 2-feet of it may split entirely, so replacement would be the only option. However, if the crack/check goes a foot or less below the picture frame, then the ...


1

I had a similar problem. This is what I did: Removed a paving slab, this gained me 2 inches. Used a hose pipe, with the nozzle set to jet, to erode the soil that had got in, then wiggled what I could, and some came out. Used a chisel to break up what remained. Used the water jet to clear out debris.


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