Hot answers tagged

8

This is a good idea, except 1/8" x 1/8" is kinda small. 5/32" would let you use common .160 spline. Check spline availability in your area prior to choosing groove size. Yes, "trying to use the circ saw on a vertical surface is a bit dodgy". You should remove the panels and lay them flat on sawhorses if possible. You should consider using a router, which ...


7

Unless you limit usage to tiny kindling fires, this is a bad plan. Sparks are common when burning wood, and a slight breeze can put them almost anywhere. Logs burn at 600-1000 degrees F or more and hold a lot of heat in case of a tipover, etc. You will see smoke deposits almost immediately, not "over time". Wood smoke is very dirty. It's also likely that ...


5

Nope. You need a 20A breaker at the main. When you upsize wire for long distance, you do not also upsize the breaker. There's no reason to; the long distance doesn't consume any additional amps, it consumes volts. Amps remain the same. A 30A breaker is not legal on a circuit supplying 15A or 20A breakers, you can only have 30A receptacles on that. If ...


5

Every place I've lived has city or state laws that prohibit this. In Virginia, the law says no open fires (exludes bonfire which is 50') within 25' of a structure.. So, don't do this. If you are intent on continuing anyway, sketchy, unproven advice can be read below... Ten feet clearance above the flame would be needed. Wood fires can reach over 2000 F (...


4

You would need to add a new wire from a new switch for the ceiling fan. If the (required) fan-rated box that will be installed is large enough you can simply leave the splice for the center light in that box just capped off.


4

The smoke alone is going to choke you out. Even a small fire in this location is a genuine hazard. The overhead roof is way to close. The fire department would go nuts if they know you wanted to do this.


4

As long as the tar paper doesn’t get ripped up it will be fine. Even if the paper or felt is damaged it can be repaired or replaced and a little water on the plywood won’t be a problem long term.


3

Patching rarely works out, structurally or aesthetically. If you want the cost effective remedy then go with smashing it up and installing properly supported decking material. This will likely involve installation of footings for support joists. A close look at the pictures reveals an underlying problem related to movement of the porch foundation, that is ...


3

If it were sunnier on his deck, he may have less rot as the dew would dry more quickly and completely. Will removing the tree eliminate the issue? Probably not completely given how crowded things look. You're certainly not obliged to remove things that block sun from your neighbors property, however. Your house might also qualify as a sun-blocker, but I ...


3

You have to jack the porch up to get it back to the correct height. I would suggest using a level to hold at a congruent part of your roofline or front molding. Take a car jack and a 4x4 and prop the roofline until it is a bit higher (1/8") than level. Slide under some pressure treated wood or rubber shims under the posts. Check in local rafters, ...


3

It is almost certain your tree has very little to do with the condition of your neighbor's home. A couple of things to keep in mind however: Your tree ceases being your tree when it crosses the property line [in the US]. You are neither responsible for trimming that portion of your tree nor can you prevent your neighbor from trimming right up to the line ...


3

Use a 8" x 4" x 1/2" Steel Angled Deck Bracket: (the same thing that should be supporting 'B') Menards cityofchicago.org deck code, page listed as 25:


3

Based on what I've seen in the pictures I'd say you have two option: 1) get a sander and sand the entire deck or 2) get two gallons of stain remover and spray in on the entire deck and scrape it all off. Deck stains are most durable when applied to wood and coating new stain over bare wood and then wood with old stain won't give you the results you want. ...


2

If you're rebuilding, can you plan it so the posts go all the way from the footer to the existing roof? It's probably easier and maybe cheaper all around that way, and far stronger. The attachment to the roof above would probably be best handled by a piece of specialty hardware, the exact type would depend on the details of the roof corner, something ...


2

In areas with little or no seismic activity, or no high wind lift, it can be toenailed in at the top and bottom with 4 12D galvanized nails on each end. 8 toenails, 2 on each face is cool too, but I feel it is overkill. In other areas, you will need to use post clips of one sort or another similar to that you already have illustrated elsewhere in your ...


2

A post base. There are several styles, this is one.


2

Unless you want to get into concrete repair here and need an excuse, dig a 5-6 foot long pit on one side of the sidewalk, and a 1 foot long pit on the other side. Drop pipe into the 5-6 foot long pit, hammer in. Run a hose up it and flush the dirt out (probably not continuously - it's easy to overdo) and drive some more. When it pops out on the far side you ...


2

Without awaiting the rest of your pictures, I'll note that if you are removing the decking you're a hop, skip, and a jump from removing the whole porch (or at least the lower frame) which might make it a lot easier to work on. Temporary roof support during porch work is often done with 2x10's angled out into the lawn beyond the porch. Image Search for "porch ...


2

I would endeavor to keep the pier but "fix" it. First would be to get the pier block back into its original, ideal position. Probably this can be done DIY with a car jack, a bunch of scrap lumber, shovel, and a helper to muscle the block out of the way, dig/fill appropriately, then replace the block. Then drive some mini-pilings in front to help hold its ...


2

I'd budget two or three days if you're by yourself. The stairs will likely be the most time consuming. The slab is going to be obnoxious primarily because it's over that hole. It doesn't look like you can fit staging in there, and a ladder is problematic because falling debris can knock it over. I assume the dangers of demoing the slab while standing on it ...


2

If I understand the question correctly, then steps should always be a uniform height. The 9 1/2" rise at the bottom of a series of 7 1/2" rises is definitely bad. Adding a 2" platform on the ground below the step to even out the overall step size is a great idea. I'd suggest you make the platform be large - something like 2 feet deep and 6" wider on each ...


2

If it's a hollow core, then no, it won't be okay. A solid core or panel door of some kind will be okay for a while, but you'll get the longest life out of an exterior grade door.


2

If you want to have a fire pit there, go get yourself a nice propane fire pit. If you want to have a wood fire there, you'll have to build some type of chimney to direct the heat/smoke away from the ceiling. If you're really ambitious, you could build an outdoor fireplace. Just make sure the chimney is high enough above the roof, to meet local codes.


2

it depends how far those holes go. if you can over-feed one end of the joist, you can then align the other end with with the other hole and back it in. ledgers, as you suggest are a legitimate solution too, also brackets, but on brick ledgers are easier. ledgers both sides is probably the easiest to get right. you're then not relying on any unseen ...


2

There are several ways you could go about repair/replacement. Sister your new joists to the old, tear out the old deck entirely and do a floating deck, or ledgers with hangers. Your choice, and depends on the size of the porch/deck, cost of repair/rebuild and any possible code requirements.


2

Typical porch light cable will be a 2 or 3 wire big (compared to Ethernet) cable (plus ground). That is not the type of cable you would use for Ethernet - it just won't work. Could you replace that cable with an Ethernet cable - i.e., instead of running a separate cable? Maybe: The existing cable would have to be either in a conduit all by itself, or NM (...


2

I would say this home is C 1920. But I guess it could be built more recently like and older home. It's possible those columns are not so load bearing. The joists above the porch could be cantilevered. Like.. But even if load bearing I don't think it is that big of a deal. Just support them well under the porch. http://stairs4u.com/glossary/images/...


1

Beams typically rest on their posts or trimmer studs. This case is no different, really, and there's no rule that says you have to have a chunk of post running up the height of the beams. I'd miter the beams at a 45 degree angle so that each rests on half the post. Screw them together well and toenail them into the post. It'll look something like this: 8 ...


1

If you are SURE nothing is dripping there, easily tested by placing a dish over the spot during and after a rain shower, then the spot is probably absorbing moisture from the air. Something may have been spilled on the decking there that absorbs moisture better than the rest of the decking. Like a sugary or salty drink, or an animal secretion....


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