1

I would be installing 4"x4" joist hangers between the rafters and set in pieces of 4x4 P.T. lumber. If you are hanging the bed with chains, I'd drill through the 4x4's at the appropriate spot and insert bolts with washers and nuts on top. Good luck.


1

This isn't a complete answer, but neither is it appropriate as a comment ("to ask for more information or suggest improvements")... Just a few suggestions as to how you might get a little more information about the structure. There's probably some eave overhanging the wall outside the space. The height of the fascia would probably reveal the vertical ...


1

Assuming it’s “Lodgepole Pine” (Idaho Pine and Ponderosa Pine is slightly less) and it’s grade is a No. 2 and better (no loose or missing knotholes), then a 4x6 spanning 18’ will support about 105 lbs. loaded at the mid-span (slightly higher if it’s loaded at third points or further from the center point).


1

I ended up custom making metal brackets that wrap around the rafter and joist. Then fastened and eye bolt to the bottom of the bracket. Similar set up on the other side. Works well so far!


1

Every thing is cool except you cannot screw into the bottom of the joist. Drill a hole horizontal through the side of it, near the middle, and use an eye bolt instead of an eye screw. Use minimum of 7/16" bolt diameter. Nut is up real tight on both sides and swing to your hearts content.


1

Virtually any 4x4 lumber will be more than strong enough. Pressure-treated SPF would be fine, as would untreated pine/fir or cedar. You won't break a good-quality 4x4, as each is only carrying roughly a quarter of the load. Screws are almost unnecessary here, but almost anything that fits the holes well is fine. They carry very little load and simply ...


1

1" or 1-1/4" flexible polyethylene pipe, such as is used for irrigation systems, would probably do well. It would be rigid enough to hold shape, yet light enough to not knock a kid out in a forehead shot. If you're concerned about rigidity, nest one size inside another. You should be able to buy it by the foot from big-box home stores, or in small coils at ...


1

Typically it's suggested that A-frame play sets be firmly anchored in the ground to prevent tipover. A couple vigorous kids can impart enough force to tip a structure. Longevity takes a back seat to safety here. Use lumber that's decay-resistant (I wouldn't have concerns about the new breed of pressure treated lumber), and either bury it sufficiently or ...


1

The problem with the pipe idea is that unless you're going to run it at an angle, you'd never be able to get a pipe through several consecutive rafters. You may actually be OK with lag screws - a properly installed 3/8 lag screw should provide an enormous amount of withdrawal resistance. Here's a sample chart from Masco:1 I wouldn't be horribly concerned ...


1

The chain configuration does not just affect the amount of support. It also controls the angle of the seat of the swing as it moves through its arc. If you use a single hook on each end, the seat is always perpendicular to a line that extends from the center of the seat to the hook. If you use two hooks on each end, the seat will track differently, ...


1

The naive approach is to just put a bolt through the chain, below the plank, at the appropriate height, possibly with some washers around the chain to sit between the plank and the side of the bolt. My biggest worry with this approach is how the bolt will interact with the other hanging chain link that passes through the same chain link that the bolt passes ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible