Hot answers tagged

66

I have had great success using a 4x8 foot sheet of white foam board. It is extremely light weight. I hung it from ceiling on strings attached to three binder clips or bull dog clips like show below. When not in use find a place you can store it flat. If it gets broken it’s cheap to replace. If it falls on a child no one gets hurt. The white foam is a good ...


14

Cut a sheet of wood into the dimensions of your window. Screw in L brackets in the four corners of the wall where you want to put the wood. Then just like a picture frame you install four rotating pegs to hold the board in place while you watch the movie. Depending on your budget, you could also install magnets on the back of your board to hold it in place ...


11

If you're not too attached to your current design, consider getting a pull-down projector screen (example). They hide away almost completely when not in use, and you can install it without permanently attaching anything to your window frames. They also have reflective properties that make your pictures look better than a normal painted-white surface would. ...


8

The usual approach is a couple coats of polyurethane varnish. I'd sand it a bit to clean it up and give it a coat on all exposed surfaces. Steel wool between coats. It'll be apparent when you've applied enough coats to seal the edge grain well enough to protect it. Reapply every couple years as needed. If you want the plywood to have a color, simply stain ...


7

Just add (nail, screw, and/or glue) additional framing material to the side face of the joist to provide more bearing area for the subfloor.


3

It sounds like the mill’s blow detector was not functioning. Or a bad batch of glue, , plugged nozzle several possibilities, take it all back. I used to work in a plywood mill and with 2 sheets bad that unit probably will all have the same issue. I would take the cut sheets back. The mill randomly pulls sheets and chizzles chunks and those chunks only a ...


3

Never tried this, honestly don't see a point in doing it this way (expensive material, and yes, foam melts.) Ignoring the option of using a blade that causes less problems, a supporting material that costs less and does not melt would be appropriate. OSB, or MDF for two, or hardboard, for another. Hardboard being the generic term for Masonite® which you ...


3

Here are some of my experiences: 3/4" boards The max commonly available width is going to be 12" (11.25" actual), so for 14" you would have to join two 8" boards ripped to width. This requires more work than the other options and you have to find two very straight boards to start with. They can warp in the future, but glueing and biscuiting two pieces ...


3

Since you are cantilevering off the wall, the verticals must be exemplary. This is a very significant structural side load. I would consider Unistrut, and it must be tied to studs proper, never to drywall itself. If the stays (diagonal cables) came the whole width of the bed, they would carry up to 100% of the occupancy load if the person is rolled out ...


3

If you do not have a table saw and the run out table big enough for this job and you do not have a track saw you can use a straight edge and clamps. The straight edge (hear after referred to as SE ) needs to be rigid so it will not flex in the middle, a long level works, but some times it so thick that the motor of the saw may not pass over it, and the ...


3

Cut your new patch to a size that would lap the framing halfway. Lay it in place and trace it. Cut out the old subfloor to the trace line with your circular saw set to a suitable depth. While you could add framing blocking, that's sometimes easier said than done in tight areas.


2

The plywood plant I worked in made hardwood faced plywood. The core section(s) were fir. The reason hardwood is suggested for furniture is for looks. There may be all hardwood types out there but I know several plants in the Pacific Northwest only face the panel and some times on only 1 side.. as for the thickness that is where your strength comes from the ...


2

You can certainly use pine/fir plywood. It depends entirely on the appearance you're after. Pine tends to look more casual or rustic than fine hardwoods. It's also softer on the surface veneer, which is why the best furniture tends to be mahogany, oak, maple, cherry, etc. It's not substantially less rigid, though. Hardwood plywood is usually only hardwood ...


2

As you can see the factory prints information on each sheet during the manufacturing process. Occasionally there is an error and ink is splattered during the time the sheet is passing through the conveyor getting trimmed,stamped,edges painted,etc... Looking at your first picture we see the pattern of black spots stops at the joint between two sheets. That ...


2

Many designs have legs at both exterior corners, but your design uses stays, the stays should reach more than half way across the platform, else they and the hinge will be seeing magnified loads. the top end of the stay should be as high as possible on the frame. perhaps consider folding stays instead of telescopic. The ladder should rest on the floor when ...


2

60" is too long of a span for 3/4" material even with nothing on the shelves. If they don't sag noticeably immediately from their own weight, they soon will. I would install corbels reaching at least 2/3 depth at the center point for each shelf. Then you can use whatever you like, as almost any 3/4" material will span 30" fairly well. If you really want a ...


2

I agree with fred_dot_u, and I'd add a few points: The grade and type of plywood is important. CDX will have 3-4 plies, gaps, knots, etc. that could dramatically weaken the critical corner areas of your piece. Better plywood has no voids, many thin plies, and higher-quality veneer. A bias might be the best approach. If you cut square with the sheet, half ...


2

Of all your designs, the last one certainly has much to its credit. If you use sheets of plywood to create the individual inverted-U shapes, you'll gain that much more strength. Consider a combination of the design previous (with the gussets) and cut your shapes to include an arc to the inside of each leg. This provides for contiguous transfer of forces as ...


2

The wild and crazy, "probably-more-work-than-it's-worth" idea is to make solid shutters that fold to the sides of the windows when you want light+circulation. But, it appears that you already have the plywood. And, you want the projection area to exceed the dimensions of the plywood, so it really should be flush mounted with the wall and have as little gap ...


2

Your biggest problem isn't retaining the plywood, it's how not to damage the window or walls. Cut the plywood accurately to the window aperture minus 1/4" each side, and then stick pipe insulation all the way along each side (including corners!) to cushion the edges. This also makes the plywood sheet an interference fit to the window aperture, which means ...


2

The culprit turned out to be my lack of experience. Previously, I’ve only used the regular, direct-drive circular saw, but had never used a worm-drive saw. When I had installed a new blade, I assumed that branded side of the blade should be visible just as it is on a regular saw. Since the blade on the worm-drive saw is on the left side, but rotation is the ...


2

My first guess was, with at least 667 pounds on a caster, there's no way 1/2" plywood is going to hold up. I'd want this plan stamped by a PE and a certificate of insurance for their E&O policy. There's information available for uniform loads on plywood for general construction but not for concentrated loads. I would not put much faith in something ...


2

Do you need to seal the faces? Not really in the conditions you described. I have worked in a plywood plant and all the product used the same glue. The difference was the quality of veneer and if any holes were plugged , and later filled and sanded. The last step they did spray the edges and put the company logo on the side of the unit. Painting the surface ...


2

I would try boiled linseed oil and turpintine. I use them for the floors on my trailers.


2

I'm not an expert on this but based on what I know about breathable membranes in building construction I don't think you would want to have the membrane on the interior side of the OSB or plywood sheeting. I'm also not sure why you would want to do that. The problem is that these membranes are water-proof but vapor-permeable. With the OSB between the ...


1

A method to prevent tearout that I've had success with was using 1.5 or 2 inch painters tape. Roughly figure out where you want to cut and place the tape over that area. Tape on both sides, pressing it down firmly. You use the wider tape to give you a margin of error. Mark your line and cut. Peel off the tape when finished. A blade with a finer cut (more ...


1

Yes, you can add insulation without removing the plywood. There are several issues you’ll need to address: 1) ventilation, 2) vapor barrier, 3) recessed ceiling lights 1) Ventilation in the attic is critical. The code calls for “cross ventilation”. That means soffit vents, gable end vents, or both. (Ridge vents can supplement soffit vents or gable end ...


1

I'm assuming that the floor of the attic is insulated, and the roof is not insulated at all. Do I have the right picture? Options A: Put insulation on top of the plywood. This is straight forward, and can be done with soffet baffles at the edges, and half a day's work with an insulation blower. You can choose between cellulose and fiberglass. The former ...


1

If you CNC cut 10 U-shaped pieces from 1/2" plywood then glue it up, as you show in your last image, you essentially have one U-shape cut from a piece of 5" thick plywood, except that you don't have the pressure and heat used in manufacturing plywood. By cutting flat shapes, you would have some increased strength on the corners, but I'd still want to have ...


1

I would use plywood, it is much stronger than MDF. Finish the edge with heat activated veneer, or moulding. What are you putting on the shelves? If you are putting heavy items such as books, 60 inches is too far of a span. I have a 30 inch span that doesn't sag noticeably with books. You could probably go a little more, maybe 40 inches without additional ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible