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If you want to replace the whole faucet, do a computer search for a 5/8" OD outside compression hose faucet. Arrowhead brass & plumbing has a model #254CCLF that should do the trick. You may find a replacement at a plumbing store or large hardware store. If you do not want to replace it , rebuild it as the other guys have written.


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A "stopcock" is traditionally a 90 turn on/off; the photo looks like a valve. Difficult to determine type of valve from the photo. For a valve you can loosen the packing nut and this may help to turn the stem, oil may help. Be sure to retighten the packing nut.


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I agree with SiHa. Also, notice how the body of the valve has a hex nut formed into it. This means you can rebuild it. If you find a valve upstream to stop flow, simply remove that entire assembly and take it to a good hardware store or plumbing supply shop. Presto, a fresh valve. Be prepared for quite a bit of water dropping out from above. Then take SiHa's ...


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Yes, that is almost certainly your stopcock, they very commonly seize up, especially if they are opened 'hard'. You could try tapping firmly on the end of the stem, whilst trying to turn it, to get it to release, but it's likely to be jammed solid. It looks like you're in the UK, so you should, hopefully have a stopcock out in the street. It'll be with the ...


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I would suggest you replace the handle with one that will not corrode. You show it close to the water feed entrance to your domicile, during parts of the year the water coming in is colder than the dew point causing moisture in the air to condense. This in turns causes it to rust. You could clean it and coat it with a rust inhibitor, this is not permanent ...


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Dissimilar metals is why its rusting and no the valve itself is fine just replace the handle carefully and. Contrary to one answer yes u can buy just a handle


5

I'm not familiar with the name of that top part, but this image from The Fixit Zone calls it a "bonnet nut". That could be a regional name. In a very traditional hose bib like yours, there are two ways for it to leak. It can leak out of the hose connection if the internal washer is worn out, or it can leak out of the handle if the "packing&...


2

The hose bib that you have is connected to the wall with a compression fitting. The parts of the fitting are shown in the image below. Imagine the tee is your hose bib. I assume you are trying to replace the hose bib, and that presents a few problems. Looking at the image, the ferrule is a deformable soft brass washer that crimps onto the pipe when you ...


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My guess is that it would be a "male" hose bibb, though I've never heard that term. It "ends" at the nut on the pipe leading into the wall. If you were to put a wrench on that nut, and another on the flats (where it says ABC in the first pic), you could unscrew it. Of course, you'd want to remove the hose first.


5

In the UK, that fitting is sold as a "draincock" and is used for draining the pipes after shutting off the supply upstream. This one is likely intended to protect the pipe leading to the outside tap from freezing in winter. We have an identical one next to our water meter which allows us to drain the whole house prior to any major plumbing work. ...


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If I assume that barb screws into a tee underneath the insulation... Then I would replace that barb with the correct valve to match the washing machine supply hose - usually 1/2" or 3/4". But it is possible that that barb is a soldered type which means it becomes more tricky - still possible though to replace the tee and get to the valve needed.


3

This connector is called a "barb" connector. This is an elementary as it gets. The barb is made to connect a flexible hose to it. Any hose will do. A garden hose without a connector, flexible plastic hose of many types, semi-rigid plastic pipe, even pex if it is the correct size. Push an open ended hose onto it. Seal and secure the hose/pipe with a ...


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It isn't ideal. And it isn't something that anyone strives for. However it isn't the end of the world. What it means is that you will have to wipe it with a bleach product every 3-4 weeks as pink mold will grow. Having the flange sit at a slight angle with no lip outside is what you want. There should only be droplets left, not a few tablespoons ...


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