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5

It's similar to the reasoning behind using a filter for your AC units. You want to filter the air to prevent clogging up the coils and dirtying up the ducts. There is a lot of moisture in a bathroom and if you mix that up with dust and lint from towels you've got a combination of particles that will stick to the blades of the fan and also clog up the shaft ...


1

Yes you can. You will just need to remove the bolts that are at the bottom of the bowl and then raise the toilet up. I recommend flushing it first as it'll be lighter. ALso have a trash bag handy. Although you have flushed the toilet, there's usually still some water in it. I recommend one person lift the toilet up and another person put the bag under ...


1

(this answer has a UK perspective) As I understand it the main advantage of compression waste fittings is that they are not too fussy about the exact size and material of the pipe. This means they can be used with both the pipe designed for solvent-weld fittings and the pipe designed for pushfit fittings. They also have more wiggle room during assembly ...


1

It is not made for more pipes, it is a floor drain and the only way to hook more pipes t it is to break up the floor and tie into 3" line that drain does eventually tie into. This picture of the drain cap I was referring t. It is like the older cast iron type. Looking up this type of drain that is around now have openings all over it. The way it is ...


4

Here is the correct answer to the question as it is written. The copper ring is a ferrule, which is part of a compression fitting. You absolutely need the copper Ferrule for a watertight connection, and plumbers tape is not necessary when this type of connection is installed properly. If you do not know what a copper Farrule is and what a compression ...


0

You're better off hiring a new plumber. If he can't remove the cartridge then replacing the valve from the backside will be your best bet.


1

Although it was not a shower valve, my kitchen sink cartridge was real difficult to pull. Here is a video by Moen on YouTube on how to remove the shower cartridge you may have. It is very simple once you see how it is done. The plumber may have not had the cartridge handle turned to the on position. But I would not let that guy touch my shower or anything ...


3

Maybe it's me but I would try to pull it myself. Sometimes they're difficult due to corrosion and scale buildup. Once you have the cartridge puller and with the water supply turned off spray some Limeaway or other decalcifier on the cartridge. Let it sit for a bit then give it a shot. I haven't had to use a Moen puller but I doubt that if used according to ...


0

I'd repeat what you did with the faucet but after removing the cartridge put a large bowl over the opening and then open the supply valve for the hot to flush out the pipe. See if it's the same flow as the cold. Then examine the cartridge and back feed some water through to flush out any debris. Also, many faucets have valve screens installed around where ...


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Yes, there could be a connection between the two. In fact several things. Sometimes scale buildup (lime deposits) will occur especially in hard water areas. If the hot shutoff valve is old or your water is particularly hard you could have builup in the valve that is preventing full flow-through. Sometimes turning the main off and then on will loosen some of ...


0

I like solid pipe to my valves. A larger diameter pipe is stronger , but a properly anchored valve will be fine in any size. Will it hurt to go larger NO. Is it a waste of $ ? Probably. Replacing the valves would be my option but I have the proper tools , if you don’t have the tools for copper a shark bite will be fine.


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I don't think the shutoff valves leaking should have anything to do with the diameter of pipe you're using. It sounds like the situation is: you are replacing that last bit of pipe anyway because the shutoff valves are leaking, and you want to know if you can also increase the pipe diameter while doing this. Changing the pipe diameter will not do anything ...


0

If the shutoff valves are leaking repair or replace them. Why go to 3/4" copper? It sounds like a fairly simple repair. Sharkbites are fine but I don't see why you would need them. Edit It's okay to go to 3/4" and use sharkbites - won't hurt a thing if installed properly. Maintaining the 1/2" throughout would have been the cleaner way to do it. With pictures ...


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