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2

First thing to try is take off the faucet altogether, get a bucket by the pipe, and get someone to trn on the ball valves. No pressure there, then look further back. Good pressure there (turn it off again!) then there's something up with the new faucet.


1

I believe that chrome cap on the front of the knob needs to be removed. The valve I have is similar. Look all around the temp control knob for an inset set screw that takes a small allen wrench to remove. The other possible option is the chrome cap needs to be carefully pried off. In either case I think you'll find the key to removal of the knob is on the ...


1

You've mentioned the shutoff is "upstairs" but I couldn't infer the elevation of the outdoor faucet. I presume it is a few feet above outdoor ground level and that "upstairs" is several feet higher than that. In this case the "drain" on the shutoff is not a drain at all. (I'd call it a bleeder, by the way.) Instead it would be ...


1

Drains on the inside valve for outside faucets are indeed normally open for the winter to prevent freezing. You close them when you turn on the faucet in the spring - evidently you didn't look when you turned the valve on? Builders are not required to use any particular sort of pipe, so long as it meets code, unless otherwise specified in the contract. ...


1

If it is spring loaded then orientation does not matter but if it is swinging pure then it has to be orientated that its weight causes it to close.


1

You will need to install a flange to fit your existing pipe. Take some measurements and stop by your home store or a plumbing supply store. you'll probably need a close flange similar to the one below so you don't block that drain pipe As with all flanges, you will still need to drill holes into the floor to secure the flange to the floor.


1

You need to install a toilet flange for cast iron. The only thing that looks weird is that side pipe that enters and would likely be blocked by installing this flange.


6

I'm not entirely sure from the picture but it looks like there may be corrosion involved in the failure of your hose barb. If that is the case I would modify FreeMan's answer by recommending a plastic hose barb for a replacement.


18

That is a simple brass hose barb. I'd carefully unscrew it from the pipe, being sure not to twist and damage the PVC. Then I'd take it to my local hardware/big-box store and purchase one in a matching size. If you have enough slack in the tubing, I'd also cut it off an inch or so below where the barbs are stuck in it and bring that to the store. I'd use it ...


1

Thanks to MonkeyZeus suggestion. Here's the answer I'm trying. If you look around you can find a 12VDC Circulation pumps that do 2 GPM for under $50. Simply install an outlet in a location safe from water near the appliance or fixture that has some means to control it whether a switch or motion sensor. Install the pump between hot and cold lines. Plug the ...


1

So it was the diverter that is in line with the faucet. The valve inside the diverter is stuck down. It only moves a little up when the faucet is running. The valve in the downward position supplies water to sprayer which is why the sprayer was fine. Interestingly if you cycle the sprayer on and off a few times the valve loosens some and can move upward more ...


1

There are a couple common reasons why the valve(s) might be locked up: You reinstalled the valve in a position other than wide open. If the valve stem is in the closed or partially closed position (see pic below of valve that is not in the fully open position) when installed, the stem could strike the seat before the valve-body is fully tightened. This ...


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