38

It appears to be a Plastic Water Softener Air Gap...what ever that is! https://www.homedepot.com/p/KEENEY-2-in-Plastic-Water-Softener-Air-Gap-PP855-69/204374532


18

That is a simple brass hose barb. I'd carefully unscrew it from the pipe, being sure not to twist and damage the PVC. Then I'd take it to my local hardware/big-box store and purchase one in a matching size. If you have enough slack in the tubing, I'd also cut it off an inch or so below where the barbs are stuck in it and bring that to the store. I'd use it ...


6

I'm not entirely sure from the picture but it looks like there may be corrosion involved in the failure of your hose barb. If that is the case I would modify FreeMan's answer by recommending a plastic hose barb for a replacement.


5

Would try some lubricating oil on the moving part, then move it back and forth a few times to see if it helps. If that does not help, then can buy two shut off valves to add between kill switch and hoses. Can then leave kill switch open. This is low cost work around till you are happy to have someone come to replace or fix.


5

In the UK, that fitting is sold as a "draincock" and is used for draining the pipes after shutting off the supply upstream. This one is likely intended to protect the pipe leading to the outside tap from freezing in winter. We have an identical one next to our water meter which allows us to drain the whole house prior to any major plumbing work. ...


5

I'm not familiar with the name of that top part, but this image from The Fixit Zone calls it a "bonnet nut". That could be a regional name. In a very traditional hose bib like yours, there are two ways for it to leak. It can leak out of the hose connection if the internal washer is worn out, or it can leak out of the handle if the "packing&...


4

Access panel is good. As usual, your call on "I need a plumber now" or "I can tackle this myself." I [expletive redacted] hate glued in tub drains, as they have to be exactly perfect, and rarely are. This one was evidently quite wrong, and somehow man-handled into place under stress. So, I'd cut the pipe, install a slip joint drain ...


4

If you see nuts like these: Images from Lowes.com, used as example only Then that indicates your plumbing is simply screwed together. (Note that you won't see the red (or sometimes translucent white) washer until you've taken the joint apart.) Unscrew the nuts, wiggle the pipes apart, and set the pieces aside. Odds are really good that you'll be able to ...


3

I have not found an exact match for it, but I'm fairly sure it's a backflow preventer / siphon breaker / vacuum breaker. Nothing else makes sense with that low of a pressure marking, and I have found similar examples, just not this exact model. The intent would be to prevent water siphoning back out of the water heater into the cold water line in the event ...


3

Which is generally considered superior for garbage disposal grind components, galvanized steel or stainless steel? As noted in the other answer, the manufacturer warranty is probably a much better indicator of quality than anything else. There are many variables that affect durability, even just of the cutting blades, never mind the rest of the appliance, ...


3

Can't be guaranteed but it probably will fit using your existing plumbing fittings. You have tons of space and plenty of vertical drop to the wall drain. Everything you have there is compression/slip joints that have some room to slip in and out and rotate. The new unit is 3/4" wider so you'll rotate it and the trap to a position where they line up, ...


3

Those are faucet cartridges that eventually wear out, start leaking, and need to be replaced. Most cartridges are readily available either online or at your local plumbing store. You might even be able to find the correct one at your home goods store. I would suggest that you start by identifying the brand of faucet you have. It should be imprinted somewhere ...


3

This connector is called a "barb" connector. This is an elementary as it gets. The barb is made to connect a flexible hose to it. Any hose will do. A garden hose without a connector, flexible plastic hose of many types, semi-rigid plastic pipe, even pex if it is the correct size. Push an open ended hose onto it. Seal and secure the hose/pipe with a ...


3

Yes, that is almost certainly your stopcock, they very commonly seize up, especially if they are opened 'hard'. You could try tapping firmly on the end of the stem, whilst trying to turn it, to get it to release, but it's likely to be jammed solid. It looks like you're in the UK, so you should, hopefully have a stopcock out in the street. It'll be with the ...


2

Pull this out. Charlotte Pipe 3-in x 2-in dia Reducer Cast Iron Fitting, Lowes And put this in. Fernco 3 in. Hub x Cast Iron Service Schedule 40 Weight Donut, ferguson.com If it doesn't connect to a 90 degree elbow hooked to a wye laying on its side, it was done wrong in the first place. That's the only situation you should have to bust up concrete.


2

You will need an Allen Wrench to loosen the set screw. They are sold in sets of right angled wrenches and several varying sizes. There are metric and SAE sized also. Faucet set screws are usually SAE and sized towards the smaller end of the wrench sizes.


2

Interior is the side to cut in your case, and you will need to get into the wall to remove/replace the piping and hose bib. Simplest terms: you limit exposure to the elements/pests/etc. the greater the extent to which you leave the shell intact. Cut an inspection hole in the wall to get an idea of the area you'll need to work with; cut the pipe out; sweat on ...


2

Shut down the cold water supply to the boiler and draining the remaining hot water before replacing parts along the hot water line.


2

If you're serious about not wanting to shut off the water to the entire building, which you could do at night or off hours, you'll have to work it hot... I mean wet. Get the right replacement valve, open it up and attach a hose to it that goes outside or to a drain. Disconnect the supply hose from the washer and then, slowly start unscrewing the bad valve. ...


2

First thing to try is take off the faucet altogether, get a bucket by the pipe, and get someone to trn on the ball valves. No pressure there, then look further back. Good pressure there (turn it off again!) then there's something up with the new faucet.


2

If you are buying just one or two (or probably anything up to a pallet full), you really don't get to pick this kind of spec. The specs you will generally get to choose (by picking different models) are: Power - Typically advertised in horsepower (e.g., 1/2 HP, 1/3 HP) but more properly measured here in Amps (current) or Watts (power), which should be ...


2

That looks like an accessory vacuum breaker that screws on. They're required by Code, so it was probably sold as part of the sillcock. A new sillcock will have a vacuum breaker built right into it. Since I also see a manifold in that picture, you may want to review the literature on use of those with sillcocks and vacuum breakers. E.G. this question.


2

That nut needs to come all the way off. There may be yet another nut below (above?) it which needs to also come off. The hold-down plate will then slide down and off, allowing faucet removal from the top. Liberal amounts of spray penetrant will help immensely, and some force may be needed (strike with a long-handled tool) to bust that plate free from its ...


2

I'm concerned about the cost/work involved to get this fixed The valve body can stay in place as all the parts inside are servicable. Most likely it only needs new o-rings, which a plumber could do in less than 30 minutes. Plumbers charging what they do, I'd expect this to cost between $150 and $200. A description of the work involved to disassemble and ...


2

If I assume that barb screws into a tee underneath the insulation... Then I would replace that barb with the correct valve to match the washing machine supply hose - usually 1/2" or 3/4". But it is possible that that barb is a soldered type which means it becomes more tricky - still possible though to replace the tee and get to the valve needed.


2

My guess is that it would be a "male" hose bibb, though I've never heard that term. It "ends" at the nut on the pipe leading into the wall. If you were to put a wrench on that nut, and another on the flats (where it says ABC in the first pic), you could unscrew it. Of course, you'd want to remove the hose first.


2

The hose bib that you have is connected to the wall with a compression fitting. The parts of the fitting are shown in the image below. Imagine the tee is your hose bib. I assume you are trying to replace the hose bib, and that presents a few problems. Looking at the image, the ferrule is a deformable soft brass washer that crimps onto the pipe when you ...


2

I agree with SiHa. Also, notice how the body of the valve has a hex nut formed into it. This means you can rebuild it. If you find a valve upstream to stop flow, simply remove that entire assembly and take it to a good hardware store or plumbing supply shop. Presto, a fresh valve. Be prepared for quite a bit of water dropping out from above. Then take SiHa's ...


2

Turn off your water to the shower and disassemble the valve parts. Soak everything in a decalcifying cleaner. Vinegar may do it as well. You'll need to pull the cartridge. Given the state of calcification in the pics you might need to buy a valve puller to remove it. They aren't expensive and your local homestore should have one. After cleaning everything ...


1

First - a leak here is bad regardless of water leakage or not. If it leaks water sometimes, it leaks sewer gas all the time. You could try just a new rubber coupling. Perhaps the one you have is somewhat damaged. Examine the pipes carefully and remove any sharp edges that might damage the new coupling before attempting to install it. You could also cut the ...


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