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I would tile over or build a frame work and Sheetrock , if I wanted to minimize it I might remove the facing brick , I have done this a few times with inserts and used tile around the opening, I don’t like plaster or Sheetrock around fireplaces but with inserts the temps and smoke are better controlled this is the reason I use them.


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If that uneven texture in the first photo is paint lifting up, then I don't believe it was caused by a missed area of mist coat. A severe reaction like that is more likely to be surface contamination under the paint or something wiped onto the wall after painting. It's interesting that the problem occurs on both adjacent faces. Maybe there is something ...


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I am not sure what a mist coat is but it looks like there was dust that kept the mud or paint from sticking. If you had used a skim coat of mud without cleaning the surface as it dries it can flake off. The same is true on top of the mud--if it's dusty the paint may stick to the dust and flake off when dry, so in both cases a good wipe down is needed to ...


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How thick is that paneling likely to be? No one here can make that assessment for you; you will need to inspect the wall, by either drilling a hole at the intended mounting site, or opening the wall up. Is that same double-thickness situation (which looks like plaster over drywall, or maybe two layers of plaster) likely to be under the paneling? Again, ...


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It looks like there is more damage likely hidden under the plaster and the wood members there would be structural. You should remove the plaster to get to and repair this damage or verify that there is none. I suggest removing all the plaster of the relatively small area that is the ceiling of the bay window and replace with drywall after the repair work is ...


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I know this is not the answer you are looking for, for this wall is ready for plastering as it is. It will need a scrubbing or power washing to remove all or most of the dust left over from the original plaster. To get the wall flat like you ask Will require at least scraping with a tool like this. (image courtesy Razorback) This will be very time ...


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On a home this old there will be layers of oil based paint and possibly additional layers of Latex paint. The biggest concern is good prep work (cleaning removing loose material) and a Quality paint. I have used both oil and latex on Victorian era homes with excellent results. It is really an opinion question today.


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While I have used Structo-Lite for many years without issue - if your repairs aren't of substantial depth/thickness, any discussion here would be moot. For cracks and what not, on plaster walls, 90 Minute Setting-Type should suffice. Just mix what you need and store the bag in a dry place. You'll more than double the coverage area, and won't have to worry ...


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Don’t mix use the correct product. Mixing can affect the strength and texture. For a light skim coat use a topping mud or topping compound or add water to standard joint compound or mud. Prior to coating make sure to clean the surface, the leading cause of failure is surface contamination. Dust is a big one, smoke , oil all of these may be hard to see but ...


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I would patch cracks with general purpose , any large cracks use paper tape or mesh so it won’t crack in the same place after being painting. To give a really easy nice finish after the patch work is done is to use “topping mud”, it is much lighter than general purpose and way easy to sand. I used this method on “quick skim” jobs where I wanted to change the ...


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I've seen it flake off a ceiling, use a veneer plaster instead.


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