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13

Yes, knock off any bumps between coats, but there's no need to get it perfect. A screen sander on the end of a pole is the best tool for this job. And it goes without saying that you should minimize any bumps while the mud is still drying to avoid having to sand it later. Some even recommend using the premix joint compound on the last coat and, just before ...


12

Pick up a small bucket of an all purpose patch likeDap Flexall All Purpose Filler. The all purpose stuff is a little thicker than typical joint compound, so it makes filling a bit easier. Remove the switch cover. Using a taping knife, fill in the holes by pushing the compound into the hole and drawing the knife away from the hole. Like so... Repeat for ...


12

It's all about particle size, which is classified using the Wentworth scale or The Krumbein phi (φ) scale. Sharp Sand Sharp Sand, also known as Concrete Sand is a coarse sand with larger particles. This type of sand is typically used in concrete. φ scale - 1 to 0 Size range - 1/2 to 1 mm (0.020–0.039 in) Builder's Sand Builder's Sand, also known as ...


11

You can drywall over the plaster, but you'll have to do the entire wall and screw through the plaster into the lath/studs. Alternatively, you can fix the plaster itself. The problem is, it's separated from the lath. The fix for this is to drill shallow holes into the affected area JUST DEEP ENOUGH to penetrate the plaster, not the lath. Drill the holes 4"...


11

I like the mesh tape for this sort of thing - because you can get material through it, and it seems less prone to peel. The self-adhesive aspect is not all that significant - it's merely holding it (barely) in place until it's embedded in compound. The compound is what actually sticks things together.


9

Here's my take on drywall vs skim vs full update. Skimcoat Skim coating over the plaster that is already cracking would not be a good idea. Even if you use a harder more durable mud or plaster, it will still most likely crack because of the age of your house, and the fact that your walls are already cracking (and will probably continue to do so). The ...


8

You can use something like this Wall Repair Patch to give some support to the new plaster. Cut out a square in the patch to match the size of the junction box and then put the patch in place (with the face plate off). Then apply joint compound to those gaps; the patch will give the joint compound some support. Finally when everything is dry then put the ...


7

This question is very similar to this question: How Do I Fix a Hole In Drywall There are some good answers posted, so it is worth a read. To build on those answers for this particular case, I would recommend the medium size hole fix. The only difference is since the hole is on the small side, trying to screw the new 3" circular piece may crack or break ...


7

Move the anchors to a stud and attach them with long screws. Use a stud finder (preferably with a deep scan capability since you mentioned plaster) to locate your studs. Or you can drill some small test holes since you already need to patch the wall. Don't use drywall screws, you need something with more shear strength. I wouldn't use anything less than a 2"...


7

Find the lowest point in the ceiling and place a small pencil mark there. Then measure from the floor to that point and record the measurement. Periodically re-measure and if measurement is getting smaller, then the sagging is getting worse.


7

You're already putting lots of holes in your ceiling, which will have to be patched. As long as you don't mind some holes, try this: Use approximately a 1/4" drill bit to drill into a likely spot on your ceiling. If it hits wood all the way through, you've just found a joist. If it goes through the lath and hits a void, get a piece of wire or an old coat ...


7

If you have failing plaster and lathe interior walls, the process is a bit more complicated than just troweling on some new top coat plaster. The scratch coat, or first coat that bonds with "keys" through the lathe. When these keys fail or break off behind the lathe, portions of the plaster will become loose and often fall off the wall. The correct fix is ...


7

Often, people talk about “old-fashioned horse-hair plaster,” but the binding agent in old plaster walls was more commonly cattle hair. -searshomes.org I am reasonably sure it's not asbestos.


6

The two standard ways to strip paint is heat or chemicals. Both are labor intensive and messy, and chemicals are caustic. I assume you are planning to strip the paint only because you are left with an uneven surface after it was already partly removed? Otherwise, just paint over it right? It might be easier to lightly scrape to remove loose paint, then skim ...


6

Short answer: Yes. Long answer: How Use a utility or x-acto knife to cut away enough of the paper that you get a nice clean edge that isn't pulled away from the underlying gypsum. Use a very small amount of joint compound and a 6" putty knife to apply a nice thin coat of joint compound over the damaged area. Don't use too little - a little too much is ...


6

FEMA Earthquake Prep According to the PDF, page 5-3 Figure 2 shows methods to anchor heavy, tall furniture to vertical wall studs, concrete, or masonry with steel angle brackets. Fasten heavy objects to the building structure and not just to a movable wall in your home or office. Even large, heavy objects that appear stable should be ...


6

Your task is to find the studs.. Electronic versions of stud finders abound, plaster is difficult for most of them. I have a 1/2 dozen of them.. I keep hoping. The problem with plaster is the lath used to support it. The lath can be a variety of materials: wood strips, metal mesh and even pasterboard. All of these materials are attached to the studs ...


6

Put a camera on a tripod, have it take a picture at the same time every day, and then overlay the pictures on each other.


5

How old is the house? Looks like that may have slats/plaster rather than drywall. Regardless, if it got wet, it needs to be replaced to prevent mold damage. Remove the trim, cut away the wall till you encounter no moisture.. most likely you'll have to replace the insulation as well, then put up some new drywall. Tape the edges, plaster, sand.. prime, then ...


5

In older structural brick buildings, it was relatively common to plaster directly to the exterior brick walls. Most of this plaster has successfully held for 100+ years, so if you were to simply remove the loose plaster and re-plaster I would imagine that it would hold for quite a long time as well. However it plastering is a bit of a lost art and can be ...


5

Fiberglass Mesh Tape Fiberglass mesh tapes are usually self adhesive and easy to use, so tend to be the tape of choice for many DIYers. Mesh tapes tend to be a bit thicker, and require more compound to cover. Mesh tapes are self adhesive, so once they're stuck they don't tend to bubble or peal later. Paper Tape Paper tapes can be a bit more difficult ...


5

This will be a variation of what may have been mentioned already, but this is how I would handle it. For the tall vertical piece, assemble 2 pieces of 1X material to make an outside corner that will mimic the left side wall where it meets the door. At the top add an additional piece of 1X to fill the void at the wood joist or beam at the top of the door. ...


5

Depending on the thickness of the existing plaster, a drywall patch with suitable support behind it (with "mud" or patching compound over it to merge the edges with existing plaster and achieve a smooth surface) may be a perfectly reasonable solution. Getting it really smooth and level so the patch doesn't "telegraph" through the wallpaper will take some ...


5

Old houses that had interior plaster as a finish had what they called a plaster stop to control depth of the plaster. This was usually a strip of 3/4 wood at bottom of wall and around doors and windows. It looks like this strip was removed but normally it was always left in as a nailing strip for the baseboard. Your application of the foam is good idea.


5

There might also be asbestos in the plaster and contaminating the lath. Did you have the wall tested prior to demolition? (I'm guessing no) You may have to be very careful with this material and possibly apply a complex and detailed cleaning of the site to render it safe, sorry to say. Here's to hoping that it doesn't have asbestos... In USA the use of ...


5

tear it all down, replace with regular sheetrock / drwywall.


5

The best approach is to fix the plaster and paint. Some other ideas: Install oversize device plates. Since you have nice stainless-steel plates now, this will be more expensive, but it would be quick and easy. You may be able to find or make backing plates that fit around the devices, behind the existing plates, and extend outward a small distance. As a ...


4

Are you comfortable with cutting the bolt to a length between 2" and 3"? That would be simplest. Another possibility would be to use another piece of wood between your shelf and the wall to create more thickness for the 3" bolts. If the concrete is actually concrete block, you can drill into that quite easily with a masonry bit from your local hardware ...


4

The answer really depends on what you are trying to do. A full skim coat, patching, or covering lead paint. In general, many GP premixed compounds specifically say not to be used as a skim coat. For the sake of argument, let's assume you are doing a full skim coat. Start with a full bodied joint compound, not a lightweight. Divide the pail in half into ...


4

Go ahead and place the drywall over the top edge of the crown moulding. Sounds like the wall was already re-plastered with it in place. If you tried to remove it, you may end up re-doing the walls as well. Even forgetting that, it's almost impossible to remove moulding without sustaining some loss. Without replacement material available, removal with intents ...


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