Hot answers tagged

36

Yes, there is a very good reason. If you add water to dry mix in the bottom of the container, you get a nearly impossible to incorporate glob of the dry mix at the bottom. On the other hand, if you add it from the top, it's much easier to get it all incorporated. This works with everything from pancake mix to drywall compound. Try it each way and you'll see ...


16

Here's how you get paint to stick to things. Scuff-sand. Paint cannot bond to a shiny surface; don't take my word on it, try to paint a mirror and see what happens. Paint wants to see a surface that looks like Swiss Alps on a microscopic level - lots of jaggies and crevasses for paint to flow into and bond in shear. To human eyes, that doesn't look ...


14

From Chemistry: "Do like you oughtta: add acid to water" . Besides the "glop" problem mentioned in the answer, there is almost always released heat when dissolving something in water. If you start with lots of reagent and little water, the water may boil, leading to rather undesirable dispersal of hot reagent.


12

It's all about particle size, which is classified using the Wentworth scale or The Krumbein phi (φ) scale. Sharp Sand Sharp Sand, also known as Concrete Sand is a coarse sand with larger particles. This type of sand is typically used in concrete. φ scale - 1 to 0 Size range - 1/2 to 1 mm (0.020–0.039 in) Builder's Sand Builder's Sand, also known as ...


11

I like the mesh tape for this sort of thing - because you can get material through it, and it seems less prone to peel. The self-adhesive aspect is not all that significant - it's merely holding it (barely) in place until it's embedded in compound. The compound is what actually sticks things together.


9

Here's my take on drywall vs skim vs full update. Skimcoat Skim coating over the plaster that is already cracking would not be a good idea. Even if you use a harder more durable mud or plaster, it will still most likely crack because of the age of your house, and the fact that your walls are already cracking (and will probably continue to do so). The ...


8

You're already putting lots of holes in your ceiling, which will have to be patched. As long as you don't mind some holes, try this: Use approximately a 1/4" drill bit to drill into a likely spot on your ceiling. If it hits wood all the way through, you've just found a joist. If it goes through the lath and hits a void, get a piece of wire or an old coat ...


8

What you see there is a hybrid gypsum/plaster from the 1950s. It represents a transitional stage between traditional wood lath and plaster to modern drywall techniques. You'll probably find metal lath at inside corners and metal corner bead at outside corners and door openings. The gypsum panels are 18 or 24" high. I owned a home with exactly that in it ...


8

I have fixed paint similar to this in my current house. There were large areas where I could peel it off back to the plaster by hand or with a scraper. Your builder's first coat has failed to adhere to the plaster and now it's peeling off. This could have been caused by: Painting with full strength paint rather than a mist coat Painting before the plaster ...


7

Find the lowest point in the ceiling and place a small pencil mark there. Then measure from the floor to that point and record the measurement. Periodically re-measure and if measurement is getting smaller, then the sagging is getting worse.


7

If you have failing plaster and lathe interior walls, the process is a bit more complicated than just troweling on some new top coat plaster. The scratch coat, or first coat that bonds with "keys" through the lathe. When these keys fail or break off behind the lathe, portions of the plaster will become loose and often fall off the wall. The correct fix is ...


7

Often, people talk about “old-fashioned horse-hair plaster,” but the binding agent in old plaster walls was more commonly cattle hair. -searshomes.org I am reasonably sure it's not asbestos.


6

Put a camera on a tripod, have it take a picture at the same time every day, and then overlay the pictures on each other.


6

Your task is to find the studs.. Electronic versions of stud finders abound, plaster is difficult for most of them. I have a 1/2 dozen of them.. I keep hoping. The problem with plaster is the lath used to support it. The lath can be a variety of materials: wood strips, metal mesh and even pasterboard. All of these materials are attached to the studs ...


6

FEMA Earthquake Prep According to the PDF, page 5-3 Figure 2 shows methods to anchor heavy, tall furniture to vertical wall studs, concrete, or masonry with steel angle brackets. Fasten heavy objects to the building structure and not just to a movable wall in your home or office. Even large, heavy objects that appear stable should be ...


6

Short answer: Yes. Long answer: How Use a utility or x-acto knife to cut away enough of the paper that you get a nice clean edge that isn't pulled away from the underlying gypsum. Use a very small amount of joint compound and a 6" putty knife to apply a nice thin coat of joint compound over the damaged area. Don't use too little - a little too much is ...


6

It looks like there is more damage likely hidden under the plaster and the wood members there would be structural. You should remove the plaster to get to and repair this damage or verify that there is none. I suggest removing all the plaster of the relatively small area that is the ceiling of the bay window and replace with drywall after the repair work is ...


5

Fiberglass Mesh Tape Fiberglass mesh tapes are usually self adhesive and easy to use, so tend to be the tape of choice for many DIYers. Mesh tapes tend to be a bit thicker, and require more compound to cover. Mesh tapes are self adhesive, so once they're stuck they don't tend to bubble or peal later. Paper Tape Paper tapes can be a bit more difficult to ...


5

This will be a variation of what may have been mentioned already, but this is how I would handle it. For the tall vertical piece, assemble 2 pieces of 1X material to make an outside corner that will mimic the left side wall where it meets the door. At the top add an additional piece of 1X to fill the void at the wood joist or beam at the top of the door. ...


5

In my years in the construction trade, here is my synopsis of concrete floats and trowels and their uses. I will start with the screed. A screed can be as simple as a short piece of framing, 1X3 or 2X4, long enough to go from side to side of a concrete form, whether it be for a 12" thick foundation or a 3' wide side walk. For larger poured slabs the screed ...


5

Depending on the thickness of the existing plaster, a drywall patch with suitable support behind it (with "mud" or patching compound over it to merge the edges with existing plaster and achieve a smooth surface) may be a perfectly reasonable solution. Getting it really smooth and level so the patch doesn't "telegraph" through the wallpaper will take some ...


5

Old houses that had interior plaster as a finish had what they called a plaster stop to control depth of the plaster. This was usually a strip of 3/4 wood at bottom of wall and around doors and windows. It looks like this strip was removed but normally it was always left in as a nailing strip for the baseboard. Your application of the foam is good idea.


5

There might also be asbestos in the plaster and contaminating the lath. Did you have the wall tested prior to demolition? (I'm guessing no) You may have to be very careful with this material and possibly apply a complex and detailed cleaning of the site to render it safe, sorry to say. Here's to hoping that it doesn't have asbestos... In USA the use of ...


5

Since this got ZERO love, and I have finished the job, figured I would post what I did. Simply bought some wire mesh from the local home goods store, and screwed it directly into the wood lathe after breaking out the hole a bit more. That gave me a good base for my 20 minute hot mud to mushroom through. As for the rounded corner -- it was nothing ...


5

The term for that drywall like product to my knowledge has been called "rock lath". All the demo I have done in remodeling, the sheets are/were 3/8" thick and 16" tall by 4 ft. wide. Before rock lath come along, wood lath was installed on the walls as 4 ft. long by approx 1 1/2" strips. It was nailed up in sections that were 16" wide. This was done over the ...


5

tear it all down, replace with regular sheetrock / drwywall.


5

The best approach is to fix the plaster and paint. Some other ideas: Install oversize device plates. Since you have nice stainless-steel plates now, this will be more expensive, but it would be quick and easy. You may be able to find or make backing plates that fit around the devices, behind the existing plates, and extend outward a small distance. As a ...


5

Looks like brick dust. As for the other two holes, they probably went into the mortar joint between two bricks.


4

I have had a lot of success in the past by using a mixture of PVA Glue and water and then painting the solution over the crumbling area. The glue gets absorbed into the crumbling surface and stabilises it. Then you can refinish with a thin coat of filler or plaster. It saves a lot of work.


4

Go ahead and place the drywall over the top edge of the crown moulding. Sounds like the wall was already re-plastered with it in place. If you tried to remove it, you may end up re-doing the walls as well. Even forgetting that, it's almost impossible to remove moulding without sustaining some loss. Without replacement material available, removal with intents ...


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