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36

Yes, there is a very good reason. If you add water to dry mix in the bottom of the container, you get a nearly impossible to incorporate glob of the dry mix at the bottom. On the other hand, if you add it from the top, it's much easier to get it all incorporated. This works with everything from pancake mix to drywall compound. Try it each way and you'll see ...


16

Here's how you get paint to stick to things. Scuff-sand. Paint cannot bond to a shiny surface; don't take my word on it, try to paint a mirror and see what happens. Paint wants to see a surface that looks like Swiss Alps on a microscopic level - lots of jaggies and crevasses for paint to flow into and bond in shear. To human eyes, that doesn't look ...


14

From Chemistry: "Do like you oughtta: add acid to water" . Besides the "glop" problem mentioned in the answer, there is almost always released heat when dissolving something in water. If you start with lots of reagent and little water, the water may boil, leading to rather undesirable dispersal of hot reagent.


11

I like the mesh tape for this sort of thing - because you can get material through it, and it seems less prone to peel. The self-adhesive aspect is not all that significant - it's merely holding it (barely) in place until it's embedded in compound. The compound is what actually sticks things together.


9

Here's my take on drywall vs skim vs full update. Skimcoat Skim coating over the plaster that is already cracking would not be a good idea. Even if you use a harder more durable mud or plaster, it will still most likely crack because of the age of your house, and the fact that your walls are already cracking (and will probably continue to do so). The ...


8

What you see there is a hybrid gypsum/plaster from the 1950s. It represents a transitional stage between traditional wood lath and plaster to modern drywall techniques. You'll probably find metal lath at inside corners and metal corner bead at outside corners and door openings. The gypsum panels are 18 or 24" high. I owned a home with exactly that in it ...


8

I have fixed paint similar to this in my current house. There were large areas where I could peel it off back to the plaster by hand or with a scraper. Your builder's first coat has failed to adhere to the plaster and now it's peeling off. This could have been caused by: Painting with full strength paint rather than a mist coat Painting before the plaster ...


7

If you have failing plaster and lathe interior walls, the process is a bit more complicated than just troweling on some new top coat plaster. The scratch coat, or first coat that bonds with "keys" through the lathe. When these keys fail or break off behind the lathe, portions of the plaster will become loose and often fall off the wall. The correct fix is ...


7

Often, people talk about “old-fashioned horse-hair plaster,” but the binding agent in old plaster walls was more commonly cattle hair. -searshomes.org I am reasonably sure it's not asbestos.


6

Old houses that had interior plaster as a finish had what they called a plaster stop to control depth of the plaster. This was usually a strip of 3/4 wood at bottom of wall and around doors and windows. It looks like this strip was removed but normally it was always left in as a nailing strip for the baseboard. Your application of the foam is good idea.


6

It looks like there is more damage likely hidden under the plaster and the wood members there would be structural. You should remove the plaster to get to and repair this damage or verify that there is none. I suggest removing all the plaster of the relatively small area that is the ceiling of the bay window and replace with drywall after the repair work is ...


5

Fiberglass Mesh Tape Fiberglass mesh tapes are usually self adhesive and easy to use, so tend to be the tape of choice for many DIYers. Mesh tapes tend to be a bit thicker, and require more compound to cover. Mesh tapes are self adhesive, so once they're stuck they don't tend to bubble or peal later. Paper Tape Paper tapes can be a bit more difficult to ...


5

This will be a variation of what may have been mentioned already, but this is how I would handle it. For the tall vertical piece, assemble 2 pieces of 1X material to make an outside corner that will mimic the left side wall where it meets the door. At the top add an additional piece of 1X to fill the void at the wood joist or beam at the top of the door. ...


5

In my years in the construction trade, here is my synopsis of concrete floats and trowels and their uses. I will start with the screed. A screed can be as simple as a short piece of framing, 1X3 or 2X4, long enough to go from side to side of a concrete form, whether it be for a 12" thick foundation or a 3' wide side walk. For larger poured slabs the screed ...


5

Depending on the thickness of the existing plaster, a drywall patch with suitable support behind it (with "mud" or patching compound over it to merge the edges with existing plaster and achieve a smooth surface) may be a perfectly reasonable solution. Getting it really smooth and level so the patch doesn't "telegraph" through the wallpaper will take some ...


5

There might also be asbestos in the plaster and contaminating the lath. Did you have the wall tested prior to demolition? (I'm guessing no) You may have to be very careful with this material and possibly apply a complex and detailed cleaning of the site to render it safe, sorry to say. Here's to hoping that it doesn't have asbestos... In USA the use of ...


5

Since this got ZERO love, and I have finished the job, figured I would post what I did. Simply bought some wire mesh from the local home goods store, and screwed it directly into the wood lathe after breaking out the hole a bit more. That gave me a good base for my 20 minute hot mud to mushroom through. As for the rounded corner -- it was nothing ...


5

The term for that drywall like product to my knowledge has been called "rock lath". All the demo I have done in remodeling, the sheets are/were 3/8" thick and 16" tall by 4 ft. wide. Before rock lath come along, wood lath was installed on the walls as 4 ft. long by approx 1 1/2" strips. It was nailed up in sections that were 16" wide. This was done over the ...


5

tear it all down, replace with regular sheetrock / drwywall.


5

The best approach is to fix the plaster and paint. Some other ideas: Install oversize device plates. Since you have nice stainless-steel plates now, this will be more expensive, but it would be quick and easy. You may be able to find or make backing plates that fit around the devices, behind the existing plates, and extend outward a small distance. As a ...


5

Looks like brick dust. As for the other two holes, they probably went into the mortar joint between two bricks.


4

I have had a lot of success in the past by using a mixture of PVA Glue and water and then painting the solution over the crumbling area. The glue gets absorbed into the crumbling surface and stabilises it. Then you can refinish with a thin coat of filler or plaster. It saves a lot of work.


4

Typically a contractor will use a brad nailer such as this: Brads (A thin wire nail, glued together like staples) generally are long, and driven at a high speed and won't split the molding. The advantage of brad nailing is that in the future, the molding can be removed without damage to the molding or the wall behind. Note that you will still need to ...


4

I would not add drywall over plaster, as the guy said before. You have to not only look at the depth of electrical outlets, but now your door jambs are the wrong size, and window sills and trim will all have to be redone.


4

Assuming that you have masonry walls, you need masonry drill bits and masonry anchors, which are somewhat different than the molly anchors you find for use with hanging on plaster. Any masonry anchor style should do - as long as you size it appropriately for the item to be hung.


4

16 inches on center. Note that lathe and plaster has a number of advantages over more modern drywall, but studfinding is not among those. A standard stud finder you might buy or rent is likely to give confusing results. However a super powerful magnet, or a magnet based stud finder, will work just dandy. A row of small nails runs up and down each stud ...


4

Channelling chisel on SDS drill. For short runs a brick bolster works reasonably well (and produces much less dust) Deeply scoring the plaster with a knife beforehand to define the edges of the channel may help to prevent large irregular chunks being removed.


4

What I have done on my 1909 house (I am in the U.S.) in the same exact situation is clear a wider area of the lath and plaster and replace it with drywall. To do that, you will need to add some padding over the studs because the lath&plaster is thicker than 1/2" -- what I did was pad it with 3/8" plywood, then drywall over plywood to achieve ...


4

I'd use joint compound, and smooth it in with a putty knife as smoothly as possible. Then, when it's dry, use a damp sponge to smooth it over to a paintably smooth surface.


4

There are huge differences. I am sure a professional tradesman can go over the exact specifics but here is my common man take (even though I have drywalled too many houses to remember): plaster generally sets more quickly plaster is thicker plaster can be applied more thickly (joint compound you get about 1/8") plaster to me is like working with thinset ...


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