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42

It is highly likely that that piping arrangement is made that way to facilitate the installation of a water softener. A water softener will have a need to accept a pipe with incoming hard water and another for the outflow of conditioned water to the rest of the residence. When a water softener is installed the U shaped fittings at the bottom of those two ...


6

Looks to me like a heat trap, intended to keep hot water from flowing back through the cold water inlet. A connection for a water softener would be arranged so that all water to the house (with possible exception of the outdoor faucets and the kitchen cold) could be routed through the softener. Softening just the hot water makes little sense.


4

No, I don't think you're over-complicating it. You don't want to just have a piece of 3/4 inch plywood floating around in there without securing it to the studs. There are a number of ways to do this type of job and your approach seems sound. Be sure to securely attach the 2x (screws or nails) and the 3/4 ply to the 2x. Also, I noticed what appears to be ...


3

Without knowing the rest of the layout, I can't be 100% certain, but there a few possibilities: As others have mentioned, it could have been placed that way because the original owner intended to fit a "softener" or "filter". Since the house is over 20 years old, its possible there was previously some other device fitted that has subsequently been removed. ...


2

I believe that is a coating sprayed on to keep water from penetrating into layers of shower. Middle of those showers is cardboard with fiberglass sprayed over it. As far as the strapping of the valve. Just silicone your plywood to shower use short enough screws as to not hit the tub and maybe use 2 straps instead of just one. I've done it many times over ...


2

@Michael Karas has it right. This website has a DIY that explains things rather well, complete with diagram and YouTube video. They recommend 10ft of pipe between the water softener and water heater to prevent backflow of hot water into the softener, similar to @Hot Licks heat trap, but I personally would use a check valve, which allows flow in only one ...


1

"Water hammer" is the result of any sudden change in pressure or flow in a pipe. Liquids (water) don't compress or expand, so when there is a sudden change in pressure or flow, the kinetic energy of the liquid gets converted to an energy shock wave that travels up and down the pipes looking for a place to dissipate, in this case as mechanical movement of the ...


1

You can control the depth of cut very accurately with a circular saw. However, banging pipes are usually caused by water-hammer, and securing the pipes doesn't completely cure the problem. You (or a plumber) can install a shock arrestor (various types are available) near the valve that is causing the problem.


1

I cannot offer a definite hard and fast rule regarding your situation, but if it helps, I can give advice based on my own experience. I live in South Africa, in Cape Town, on the coast, and recently bought a house of just over 100 years of age. In south Africa, even back then, we were using copper pipes, I've been doing alot of renovating over the last few ...


1

It depends on the water , steel can last a very long time in some waters, so doing nothing unless there is a problem is an option. Find out from neighbors ( with steel pipe) if there have been problems. If any is accessible , a piece of pipe could be removed and examined as an indication of the whole system but opening an old pipe connection can easily make ...


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