The Stack Overflow podcast is back! Listen to an interview with our new CEO.
8

You just need bigger anchors ;-) The largest of these is 60" long with a 7" diameter.


6

You have several issues: 1) Hold your building up, 2) keep your building stable (lateral stability) 3) freeze/thaw, 1) I would be careful to calculate the number of piers required to support such a heavy load as a log cabin. The piers have a small bearing area (perhaps as small as 12”x12”) and your load is tremendous. The benefit of a continuous footing ...


3

I don't think you'll find anyone that recommends mixing concrete in the hole - you can't really be sure of a good even mix this way - but people do it for fences and other posts all the time and it seems to work OK. With 90% urbanite (recycled scrap concrete chunks) I might want to be a little more careful, an unevenly mixed section could weaken the post ...


2

I had the same dilemma. The solution I used has proven to be quite simple and effective. I bought 8 rebar from the local rebar plant (total cost $16). They put a hairpin bend at the top of each bar. I used a maul to hammer these bars along the sides of the shelter, four to a side, evenly spaced. Then over the top of the shelter I passed a rope, in ...


2

I would endeavor to keep the pier but "fix" it. First would be to get the pier block back into its original, ideal position. Probably this can be done DIY with a car jack, a bunch of scrap lumber, shovel, and a helper to muscle the block out of the way, dig/fill appropriately, then replace the block. Then drive some mini-pilings in front to help hold its ...


1

How you approach the problem depends on what you propose to use as a foundation for the shed. Option 1: On-grade paver foundation Step 1: Build a retaining wall to support a flat grade. The simplest would be a gravity wall: bare wall blocks on a packed gravel base, no mortar. The 4" pavers you mention are not suitable but there are many blocks available ...


1

The new support structure with a beam that you are proposing sounds fine. If you are concerned, then overdo it by doubling the materials for the beam, or placing a steel L-rod 3/8" thick around the beam. Using an L-rod will reduce the number of bolts that you need to put through it into the beam, and will add structural support due to the angle. The more ...


1

We use these tents at shows and fairs. We always anchor them with screw in dog spikes just inside the poles, and tied straight down. I was in one during a storm with 60 mph gusts, and the tent only moved over one foot.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible